Freshman Seminar Schedule - Spring 2013

These seminars are open only to students who will be freshmen in the Spring 2013 semester. For the most current information including location of the class, see UNCGenie on the web: www.uncg.edu. (TBA means To Be Announced) We encourage students not to sign up for a seminar without first reading the course description and not to sign up for more than one seminar. Talk with your advisor about registering for a seminar.  Marker Abbreviations:
WI:  Writing Intensive
SI:   Speaking Intensive
GL: Global Perspectives
GN: Global Non-Western
Perspectives

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REASONING AND DISCOURSE II

GEC category: GRD
Also carries credit equivalent to ENG 102. You may not receive credit for both FMS 116 and ENG 102.
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
116-01

SI

T, R
11:00-12:15 p.m.

Drama, Scandal, and Rhetoric in American LifeBe the star lawyer or key witness in a gripping court battle; use cunning arguments to win the minds of a jury of your peers. Fill the shoes of a community leader who makes decisions that affect thousands; further your own political agenda while protecting your scandalous secrets. In this course, we will use large-scale role-playing activities to explore the ethical challenges that face modern democratic societies. The course will begin with philosophical readings and discussion of concepts in moral and political theory, apply those concepts in a series of role-playing mock legal trials where your character will try to persuade a jury, and conclude with a three-week-long role-playing game where you will fight for your character’s agenda and try to uncover the secrets of your rivals.

Christopher
Metivier

FMS 116-02

SI

M,W
2:00-3:15 p.m.

Believing Whacky things: Ancient Aliens, Hoaxes, Frauds and Conspiracy Theories.  People sometimes hold apparently outlandish views.  Did aliens shape human evolution and build the pyramids?  Did the city of Atlantis vanish into the sea?  Did the Knights Templar carry off the Holy Grail, pursued doggedly by agents of the Catholic Church?  Did the Nazis (or the Freemasons) have a hand in every conspiracy in the 20th century?  This course examines some of these views and what motivates those who hold them by looking at pseudoarchaeology, hoaxes and conspiracy theories, especially as presented in popular culture.  How can you tell good arguments from bad?  You will learn about the use (and misuse) of evidence, to approach issues skeptically and critically, and to examine assertions logically.

Patrick
Beasom

LITERATURE

GEC category: GLT
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
120-01

WI

M,W
2:00-3:15 p.m.

 

Fine Romance: The Evolution of a Literary Genre.  While modern romance novels may not be the first books that come to mind when we think about "literary" works, the romance in English has had a long and varied existence. Our course begins at the origins of the romance tradition in English literature. We will read short medieval English romances to examine the ideas of chivalry and courtly love and identify the narrative rules of romance. Following this, we will read "The Death of Arthur," an Arthurian romance that incorporates and amplifies the elements of earlier romance. Turning to Shakespeare's "The Winter's Tale", we will see how romance motifs cross onto the stage in Elizabethan drama. Our study then takes a domestic turn with Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice." Finally, we will study two (somewhat) recent Hollywood "blockbusters" to think about how the patterns of this age-old way of thinking about human desire remain with us.

Gary
Lim

FMS
120-02

WI

T, R
9:30-10:45 a.m.

Reading Daniel Boone.   Who was Daniel Boone: Patriot or Tory?  Indian killer or Indian lover? Solitary wanderer or family man? And what was it really like to live in the North Carolina and Kentucky backcountries, 250 years ago?  This class considers these questions by asking what fiction can possibly teach us about history. We will read a biography of Daniel Boone and historical documents; we also will consider poem, novels, TV, and films such as The Last of the Mohicans.  Students may write about historical documents or on one historical novel of their own choosing

Hope
Hodgkins

FMS
120-04

WI

T, R
11:00-12:15 p.m.

Modern Drama: Understanding the Theater as a Political Space.   What separates drama from poetry or fiction? How does the element of performance alter the way we read drama? Throughout this writing-intensive freshman seminar course, we will take these questions into consideration and explore the communal nature of drama and how that shared literary experience can create a venue for political and social activism. In order to examine these ideas, we will focus primarily on the development of Ireland’s National Theatre at the beginning of the twentieth century and the Federal Theatre Project that began in the U.S. as a result of the Great Depression. We will then use our understanding of these two national theatre movements to explore how contemporary drama engages in different forms of political rhetoric. 

Megham
McGuire

FMS 120-05

WI

M,W,F
11:00-11:50 a.m.

Contemporary Literature: Creating a Modern Mythos.  Curiosity and desire are your fare and ticket into fiction. In this class we will explore narratives of tweets, stories, novels, poems, of local and national origin.  Through your own discussion, writing, and creativity, we will develop our knowledge in class of how to more deeply read and learn about literature and its relationship to the modern world of technology.

Abigail
Browning

FMS 120-06

WI

M,W,F
12:00-12:50 p.m.

Contemporary Literature: Creating a Modern Mythos.  See FMS 120-05 for course description.

Abigail
Browning

FMS 120-07

WI

T, R
11:00-12:15 p.m.

Reading Daniel Boone.   See FMS 120-02 for course description.

Hope
Hodgkins

FMS 122-01

WI

T,R
2:00-3:15 p.m.

Tokyo: Found in Translation is a Freshman Seminar designed to introduce elements of Japanese literature, film, and culture to incoming students as well as to help develop the important academic skills of close reading/analysis and college-level writing. Students travel virtually across time and space to explore Tokyo’s distinct neighborhoods as they develop from the late Edo period on into the imaginary future Neo-Tokyo. Through film and literature, we will engage the course’s central idea of a city as literary and filmic metaphor. All readings are in English. All films are in Japanese with English subtitles.

Colleen
Laird

FINE ARTS

GEC category: GFA
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
130-01

WI

M,W,F
10:00-10:50 a.m.

Acting Change in America: Human Rights Onstage.   In this course we will look at the rich legacy of American plays that have, at their center, the struggle for equality in a chaotic world. These dramas reflect the nation’s political, social, and moral norms which have been in constant flux in the tumultuous 20th century and they bring into sharp focus the troubling prejudices and conformities that have influenced and sometimes dominated our culture.

Jeff
West

PHILOSOPHICAL, RELIGIOUS, AND ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

GEC category:  GPR
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
142-01

WI

MWF
10:00-10:50 a.m.

Telling Her Story: Women, Autobiography and Islam. Muslim women today are recording their lives in unprecedented numbers. The memoirs that have emerged are often controversial, sometimes irreverent, rarely boring. This class will examine several contemporary autobiographical accounts by women living in the Middle East and North America with the goal of answering the following questions: How do these women portray themselves and their worlds? What role does Islam play in their lives and how did it help to shape the historical circumstances in which they find themselves? How do these narrations contradict or otherwise challenge popular stereotypes about the “oppressed” Muslim woman? A variety of genres will be explored, including film, the graphic novel, poetry, and memoir.

Alyssa
Gabbay

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: Pre-Modern       

GEC/CAR category: GHP/GPM
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS 151-01

 

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45 a.m.

You Don’t Belong! The “Other” in Medieval Western Culture.  Are we “in” or are we “out”?  The historian R.I. Moore has argued that the high middle ages was the period of the “formation of a persecuting society” during which the majority (those who were “in”) willfully prosecuted various minorities (those who were “out.”)  In this course, we will examine sources by and about those on the fringes of medieval society – sources including romances, poems, art, laws, and religious texts – to see if we can find evidence to support or reject Moore’s thesis.

Anne
Barton

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: Modern

GEC/CAR category: GHP/GMO
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS 160-01

WI

T,R
11:00-12:15 p.m.

The Machine That Changed The World: The History of the Computer and Computing Technology.  This course explores the historical evolution of the computer from ancient times through the technological explosion of the 20th century, its impact on society, culture, and politics, and its potential benefit or detriment to humankind in the future.

Mark
Armstrong

FMS 160-02

 

WI

M,W,F
10:00-10:50 a.m. 
Mary Foust 128

Hollywood And History:  Truth, Lies, and Videotape.  The tragic elements of many eras in American history are almost irresistible to script writers and producers who make them into big-budget films that often take huge historical leaps over the real story. Of course, no one expects movie makers to be historians, nor is that their job, technically—their job is to make good films. Yet the visual images of movies last far longer than any lecture; the characterizations and plotlines in films persist even over the protests of frustrated historians. Movies, in reality, represent history for many of us.
This class is cross-listed with Ashby Residential College; 11 spaces are reserved for Residential College

Christine
Flood

FMS 160-03

 

WI

T,R
3:30-4:45 p.m.

 

The Modern South.  For the last half century, the question that guided much of the writing and teaching of Southern History was whether a New South emerged following the Civil War.  In recent years, that question has given way to debate over whether the South should remain a discrete region of study, entitled to close analysis and scrutiny for its unique sense of place and identity.  This course approaches that question by examining a wide array of readings that argue both for and against the idea of a distinctive Modern South.  By looking at the region’s politics, culture, and economics, students will make their own arguments and draw their own conclusions about where the South fits in today’s world. 

Susan
Thomas

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES

GEC category: GSB
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS 170-01

WI

M,W,F
12:00-12:50 p.m.

Fans, Athletes, and Sports in Modern Society.  This course investigates the place of sport in society with a special emphasis on identity. Social identities are clearly an important factor in how a person understands his or her sense of self and place in society—and identities formed in and around the issue of sport are becoming increasingly important in late modern societies. As such we’ll be looking at how these identities are achieved and disengaged for both athletes and fans. Central to this discussion will be issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation

Steven
O’Boyle

FMS 170-02

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45 a.m.

 

War and Conflict.  It has been estimated that there has been a war somewhere in the world 94%  of the time
since the dawn of civilization. Why does mankind periodically organize himself for armed conflict and
warfare? This course will begin by asking these questions and try to answer them through an examination of
the United States’ involvement in war and conflict over the last hundred years.

A. Leigh
Sink

FMS
170-03

WI

M,W,F
11:00-11:50 a.m.

There's an APP for that!:  Experience, Communication, and APPlication.  Do your experiences really help you to learn?  Can communicating about these experiences enable you to apply knowledge to your life? How will your experiences help you and others? Together we will explore the idea that learning does come from experience, communication, and application. Whether you are backpacking across Europe, struggling with the separation from a romantic partner, or waiting tables at a local restaurant, your experience in society is an opportunity to learn. Join us as we explore the many possibilities of experiential learning, critical thinking, and the life-long journey of application.

Jessica
McCall

FMS
170-04

WI
SVL

T,R
3:30-4:45 p.m.

What Makes a Community?  This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical and applied understanding of community from a sociological perspective. The content and assignments of the course are driven by the essential question, “what makes a community?” This question is given applied significance through emphasis on service-learning experiences within the Greensboro nonprofit community, as well as through oral and written reflections. Students will study the structure of communities, why communities matter, and how communities may be formed, changed and/or dissolved. Students will examine the people, relationships, and institutions that create communities. Students will address the attitudes and behaviors of individuals through an exploration of society’s responsiveness to pressing social issues facing our communities.
This course is restricted to residents of the Make a Difference House Program.

Kristin
Moretto

FMS 170-05

WI

M,W,F
1:00-1:50 p.m.

Fans, Athletes, and Sports in Modern Society. 
See FMS 170-01 for course description

Steven
O’Boyle

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