Freshman Seminar Schedule - Spring 2014

These seminars are open only to students who will be freshmen in the Fall 2013 semester. For the most current information including location of the class, see UNCGenie on the web: www.uncg.edu. (TBA means To Be Announced)   We encourage students not to sign up for a seminar without first reading the course description and not to sign up for more than one seminar.  You may not receive credit for more than one seminar under the same course number, even if the contents of the seminar are different.   Talk with your advisor about registering for a seminar. Marker Abbreviations:
WI:  Writing Intensive
SI:   Speaking Intensive
GL: Global Perspectives
GN: Global Non-Western
Perspectives

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REASONING AND DISCOURSE II

GEC category: GRD
Also carries credit equivalent to ENG 102. You may not receive credit for both FMS 116 and ENG 102.
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
115-01

SI

T.R
2:00-3:15 p.m.

Making Writing Your Superpower.  
As a freshman, you have just landed on Planet UNCG, far away from your home world.  Upon arriving, you’ve found that—oh no—writing is like kryptonite!  In FMS 115, our class will learn how to decipher the ancient myths of what makes strong college writing, and how academic discourse is both similar to and different from tweets, blogs, and emails. Join us to find your own writing superpower, and with the tool belt of rhetoric, destroy your fears of writing! Please note: FMS 115 is designed for the creative, the brave, and the determined. Heroes only, please.

Abigail Browning

FMS 115-02

SI

T,R
3:30-4:45 p.m.

Making Writing Your Superpower.  
See FMS 115-02 for course description

Abigail Browning

FMS 116-01

SI

T,R
2:00-3:15

#onlinediscourse. 
“omg lol.” “didn’t see that coming #catfish.” “I always love black and navy! @ProjectRunway @heidiklum @zannarassi @lifetimetv.” “I love my coworkers….” “Cam Newton: Great team win yesterday....but we're constantly reminded that life is much bigger than football. My thoughts and prayers to the family and loved ones..” In FMS 116, we will explore online discourse, particularly on social media, through both spoken and written projects as well as course materials and activities. A foundation of rhetorical principles, such as logical fallacies, types and qualities of evidence (including anecdotal and statistical), and considerations of audience and purpose are covered through a variety of readings and in-class discussions and activities. Application of this knowledge as well as students’ independent research, both individually and in groups, will form the basis for assignments.

Courtney
Wooten

FMS
116-02

SI

T,R
3:30-4:45

#onlinediscourse. 
See FMS 116-01 for course description

Courtney
Wooten

LITERATURE

GEC category: GLT
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
120-01

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45a.m

Prisons of the Body and the Spirit.   
 
In this course we will consider various forms of imprisonment—physical, psychological, spiritual, and to what extent the “prisoners” succeed or fail in liberating themselves.  We will be confronting physical imprisonment under the harshest conditions (Wiesel writing about his experience in a German concentration camp). In other cases the imprisonment is psychological (Emma Bovary trapped in an unhappy marriage, Kafka’s characters who are victims of their obsession).  García-Márquez’s Chronicle of a Death Foretold and Camus’s The Plague represent situations involving the figurative imprisonment of an entire community.  There are those who find themselves trapped in terminal illness (works by Tolstoy and Simone de Beauvoir) and struggle to find meaning in their suffering.  The characters in Sartre’s play, No Exit, find themselves trapped in a Hell of their own making.  A wide literary scope includes works translated from French, Russian, German, and Spanish. 

David Fein

FMS
120-02

WI

M,W,F
9:00-9:50 a.m.

Sex, Drugs, and Growing Up: Coming-of-Age Stories in Literature.   
The difficult, strange transition from childhood to adulthood is a theme that has preoccupied many literary artists, from J.K. Rowling to Steven Spielberg to Shakespeare. Should we be surprised? Growing up means facing some of life’s most dramatic and challenging experiences: love, sex, disillusionment, alienation, and even death. In this course we’ll be reading stories, novels, poems, plays, and a few other kinds of texts, all which examine that uncomfortable, sometimes funny, often fraught, time in our lives when we’re forced to leave childish things behind and to make our murky way into the uncertainty of adulthood. Finally, because this is a literature course, you can expect to learn some reading strategies that will deepen your appreciation for literary texts.

Greg Brown

FMS 120-03

WI

M,W,F
10:00-10:50 a.m.

Sex, Drugs, and Growing Up: Coming-of-Age Stories in Literature.
See FMS 120-02 for course description

Greg Brown

FMS 120-04

WI

M,W
2:00-3:15 p.m.

Scary Stuff. 
One reason diligent readers value narrative literature is that it offers new experiences and, therefore, has the potential to enrich life. The experiences we—as diligent readers—are to have in this course will all be, in a word, scary. (Don’t worry, class itself won’t be scary.) Expect not a semester’s worth of corny horror. Instead, expect to read serious books of varied thematic depth that, despite their differences, are common in their tendency to elicit fear. This commonality will get us even more excited to read than usual. Fear will also serve as the hub around which our discussions of other emotions and ideas will revolve. Finally—with any luck—we’ll end up with enriched appreciation for the relative placidity of everyday life.

Benjamin Klinkner

FMS 120-05

WI

M,W
3:30-4:45 p.m.

Scary Stuff. 
See FMS 120-04 for description

Benjamin Klinkner

FMS 120-06

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45 a.m.

Down and Out.  
We always hear about the homeless, but what about those who are just struggling? In this literature course, we’re going to read, discuss, and write about what it means to struggle. We each are trying to "make it," to get by and pay our way, so what does that mean?  We'll be engaging with music, narrative, poetry, short stories, and a novel as our entry into our own struggles. We'll explore the theme of struggle, hardship, and getting by to develop a deeper understanding of how writers depict issues of financial struggle in their work.  

Aaron Ballance

FINE ARTS

GEC category: GFA
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
130-01

WI

M, W, F
10:00-10:50

Acting Change in America: Human Rights Onstage.  
 In this course we will look at the rich legacy of American plays that have, at their center, the struggle for equality in a chaotic world. These dramas reflect the nation’s political, social, and moral norms which have been in constant flux in the tumultuous 20th century and they bring into sharp focus the troubling prejudices and conformities that have influenced and sometimes dominated our culture.

Jeff
West

FMS
130-02

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45a.m

Looking at Pictures: The Beholder’s Share.   
This course introduces the student to the art of looking, some ways of writing, and to some of the key concepts of art history. The extended contemplation and interpretation of a select number of visual works of art will be a major focus. This course encourages direct engagement with works drawn from a wide spectrum of place, medium, time, style, and social function. The intent here is to present a range of approaches to the interpretation of a limited number of artifacts that may serve as models and inspirations for further encounters with works of visual art. The Weatherspoon Art Museum’s collection and special exhibitions will be a central resource. Writing, both as a scholarly endeavor and life skill, will be emphasized throughout.

George Dimock

PHILOSOPHICAL, RELIGIOUS, AND ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

GEC category:  GPR
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS
142-01

WI

M,W,F
10:00-10:50 a.m.

Telling Her Story: Women, Autobiography and Islam.
Muslim women today are recording their lives in unprecedented numbers. The memoirs that have emerged are often controversial, sometimes irreverent, rarely boring. This class will examine several contemporary autobiographical accounts by women living in the Middle East and North America with the goal of answering the following questions: How do these women portray themselves and their worlds? What role does Islam play in their lives and how did it help to shape the historical circumstances in which they find themselves? How do these narrations contradict or otherwise challenge popular stereotypes about the “oppressed” Muslim woman? A variety of genres will be explored, including film, the graphic novel, poetry, and memoir.

This class is cross-listed with Ashby Residential College; 7 spaces are reserved for Residential College

Alyssa Gabbay

HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: Modern

GEC/CAR category: GHP/GMO
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS 160-01

WI

M,W,F
11:00-11:50 a.m.

God and the Constitution.  
Have you ever heard the adage "one should never discuss religion or politics"?  I have heard it most of my life and I think it's crazy.  Two of the most powerful forces in the history of man are religion and government.  So, we will look at their relationship in America, beginning with the writing of the Constitution in 1787 and moving all the way forward to 2013.

Jeff Colbert

FMS 160-03

WI

M,W,F
10:00-10:50 a.m. 
Mary Foust 128

Hollywood And History:  Truth, Lies, and Videotape. 
The tragic elements of many eras in American history are almost irresistible to script writers and producers who make them into big-budget films that often take huge historical leaps over the real story. Of course, no one expects movie makers to be historians, nor is that their job, technically—their job is to make good films. Yet the visual images of movies last far longer than any lecture; the characterizations and plotlines in films persist even over the protests of frustrated historians. Movies, in reality, represent history for many of us.

This class is cross-listed with Ashby Residential College; 11 spaces are reserved for Residential College

Christine Flood

FMS 160-04

WI

T,R
3:30-4:45 p.m.

The Modern South. 
For the last half century, the question that guided much of the writing and teaching of Southern History was whether a New South emerged following the Civil War.  In recent years, that question has given way to debate over whether the South should remain a discrete region of study, entitled to close analysis and scrutiny for its unique sense of place and identity.  This course approaches that question by examining a wide array of readings that argue both for and against the idea of a distinctive Modern South.  By looking at the region’s politics, culture, and economics, students will make their own arguments and draw their own conclusions about where the South fits in today’s world. 

Susan Thomas

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL STUDIES

GEC category: GSB
Course   Days/Time/Place Course Title/Description Instructor

FMS 170-01

WI

M,W,F
12:00-12:50 p.m.

Fans, Athletes, and Sports in Modern Society. 
This course investigates the place of sport in society with a special emphasis on identity. Social identities are clearly an important factor in how a person understands his or her sense of self and place in society—and identities formed in and around the issue of sport are becoming increasingly important in late modern societies. As such we’ll be looking at how these identities are achieved and disengaged for both athletes and fans. Central to this discussion will be issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation

Steven O’Boyle

FMS
170-02

WI

M,W,F
1:00-1:50 p.m.

Fans, Athletes, and Sports in Modern Society. 
See FMS 170-01 for course description

Steven O’Boyle

FMS 170-03

WI

T,R
9:30-10:45 a.m.

War and Conflict. 
It has been estimated that there has been a war somewhere in the world 94%  of the time since the dawn of civilization. Why does mankind periodically organize himself for armed conflict and warfare? This course will begin by asking these questions and try to answer them through an examination of the United States’ involvement in war and conflict over the last hundred years.

A. Leigh Sink

FMS 170-04

WI

M,W,F
11:00-11:50 a.m.

On Human Nature.   
Human beings and the societies they create, inhabit, maintain, and destroy, are the most complex entities on the planet. Much is assumed, but little is understood about what it means to be human. Perhaps the most fundamental question, which may be asked, is does human nature exist? Social and behavioral scientists from many “grand” disciplines profoundly and doggedly grapple with this question alone. In the age of a fully mapped human genome, humankind is better equipped than ever to comprehend itself. We will explore the myriad of descriptions, explanations, and methods of understanding humanity. The main intellectual “platforms” for this exploration are the landmark books by E. O. Wilson, On Human Nature, and David Sloan Wilson, Evolution for Everyone: how Darwin’s theory can change the way we think about our lives. Assessments will include short essays, exams, a term paper, and presentation.

This class is cross-listed with Ashby Residential College; 11 spaces are reserved for Residential College

Michael Cauthen

FMS 170-05

WI

T,R
2:00-3:15 p.m.

What Makes a Community? 
This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical and applied understanding of community from a sociological perspective. The content and assignments of the course are driven by the essential question, “what makes a community?” This question is given applied significance through emphasis on service-learning experiences within the Greensboro nonprofit community, as well as through oral and written reflections. Students will study the structure of communities, why communities matter, and how communities may be formed, changed and/or dissolved. Students will examine the people, relationships, and institutions that create communities. Students will address the attitudes and behaviors of individuals through an exploration of society’s responsiveness to pressing social issues facing our communities.

This class is restricted to residents of the Make a Difference House Program.

Kristin Moretto

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