Art Department

FACULTY & STAFF

Heather L. Sale Holian

Heather L. Sale Holian

Associate Professor
Art History
MA, Ph. D. Indiana University
BA cum laude, University of Arizona
Email: hlholian@uncg.edu
Office: 229 Cone
Curriculum Vitae


By training Dr. Heather L. Holian is an Italian Renaissance art historian with minors in Medieval and Roman Art. She routinely offers courses in these areas and co-leads a bi-annual, four-week, on site study abroad program to Florence, Italy where she teaches ARH 395: Florence and the Medici and directs independent research for advanced majors. Additionally, Dr. Holian teaches the Art of Disney and Pixar (ARH 210) and is currently working on a book-length project, which investigates the collaborative process and the role of the individual artist at Pixar Animation Studios. She was awarded a Research Assignment for Spring 2014 to write full-time on her manuscript. Dr. Holian’s most recent article, “Art, Animation and Collaboration,” was published June 2013 in the peer-reviewed journal, Animation Studies. (http://journal.animationstudies.org/heather-holian-art-animation-and-the-collaborative-process/) Her forthcoming essay, “Thoughts on (Pixar) Animators as (Professional) Masqueraders,” will appear in Masquerade: A Panorama, edited by Dr. Deborah Bell and published by McFarland and Co. Publishers in 2015.

Dr. Holian also actively presents her animation research at national and international conferences. This academic year she will present papers at the annual meetings of both the Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) in October 2013, and the College Art Association (CAA) in February 2014.

For more on Dr. Holian's Pixar research, check out the article in the Spring 2014 UNCG Research Magazine. Click on this interactive link and forward to page 22. 

Both in her classes and her scholarship, Dr. Holian explores art through social, cultural, formalist, iconographic and feminist methodologies. Her Renaissance interests focus on sixteenth and seventeenth century Italian court portraiture, and particularly that of women and daughters belonging to the Medici family of Florence. Her published articles on the topic explore the function of jewelry as dynastic “marker” within portraits of Medici women and marriageable girls, and the related social issue of women as dynastic commodity during this period, as communicated through these loaded images. Her article, “The Claiming Crown: Politics, Dynasty, and Gender in State Portraits of Medici Women,” published in the peer-reviewed journal, Explorations in Renaissance Culture, won the Albert W. Fields Award for the most distinguished essay published by the journal in 2010.

Syllabi

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