COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES ADVISING

More About General Education Classes

When looking for classes that meet your General Education requirements, search by Course Category rather than by Subject. Why? Not all Art classes are GFA, not all English classes are GLT, not all History classes are GHP/GMO/GPM, etc.

Descriptions for General Education Categories and Markers are from the UNCG General Education Handbook for Faculty, prepared by Lisa Tolbert and David Wharton 8/1/2010, and are periodically reviewed and revised.

Freshman Seminar Classes

If you are a freshman, you might be interested in taking a Freshman Seminar course to satisfy a General Education requirment. These are helpful because the class sizes are limited to 22 students, allowing you greater interaction in the classroom. FMS classes also generally have a WI or SI marker attached to them, so the classes fulfill more than one degree requirement!

See the following link for the latest FMS course listiings.

Honors Classes

If you are participating in the Lloyd International Honors College, you can take honors classes that also satisfy your General Education requirements.

See the following link for a listing of Honors courses

GFA - Fine Arts

Category Description: By focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture, drama, dance, cinema, or music, students gain understanding of the aims and methods of artistic expression and the role of cultural traditions and artistic value in human society.

Departments that include GFA offerings include Art, Dance, Media Studies, Music and Theatre.

GLT - Literature

Category Description: Students read and write about selected works of prose and/or poetry from diverse cultural traditions, analyzing the context, aims, and methods of literary expression.

Literature is not only found in the English department. You might find some really interesting GLT courses in departments like Classical Studies, Russian, German, or Japanese!

GPR - Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Perspectives

Category Description: For two or more significant philosophical, ethical, and/or religious traditions, students examine and compare assumptions, modes of thought, and attendant practices, and analyze their effects on behavior.

As it's name suggests, courses that meet this degree requirement include those in the Philosophy and Religious Studies departments. But Music, Political Science, and Women and Gender Studies also have some GPR offerings!

GHP - Historical Perspectives

Category Description: Students use an historical approach to a specific region and period to explore the context of events (social structure, economics, political systems, culture, or beliefs), evaluate evidence and divergent interpretations, and communicate historical ideas in writing.

GMO - Modern Historical Perspectives
This category includes course topics from the 1500's forward.

GPM - Pre-Modern Historical Perspectives
This category includes course topics before the 1500's.

Look here for the latest on course descriptions in the history department!

GMT - Mathematics

Category Description: Students gain the skills to perform computations on data, to use mathematical principles to solve problems, and to reason with and manipulate concepts within a mathematical system.

Depending on your major, there might be a specific GMT class that you should take. Ask your Academic Advisor for guidance on this.

GNS Natural Science

Category Description: By focusing on the concepts of one physical or biological science, students gain understanding of scientific inquiry as they analyze empirical information, distinguish between primary research and secondary reports, and communicate effectively about scientific issues.

GLS Life Science
Life Sciences include selected courses Biology, Biological Anthropology, Nutrition, and Biological Psychology.

GPS Physical Science
Physcial Sciences include selected courses in Astronomy, Chemistry, Geography, and Physics.

GRD 1 - Reasoning and Discourse

Category Description: Students gain skills in intellectual discourse, including constructing cogent arguments, locating, synthesizing and analyzing documents, and writing and speaking clearly, coherently, and effectively.

This degree requirement is rather specific. You need one of the following three offerings:

  • ENG 101-College Writing. Used to be called English Composition 1, but the class has not changed. Do not re-take if you have taken ENG 101-English Compostion 1. Also, ENG 101N is College Writing for non-native speakers. Only register for ENG 101N if English is NOT your primary language.
  • FMS 115-Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse. This course is only offered Fall semester, so if you didn't sign up for it your first fall semester here, take ENG 101.
  • RCO 101-English Composition 1. This class is restricted to students living in Asby Residential College.

GRD - Reasoning and Discourse

Category Description: Students gain skills in intellectual discourse, including constructing cogent arguments, locating, synthesizing and analyzing documents, and writing and speaking clearly, coherently, and effectively.

Courses that satisfy this degree requirement include: 

  • CST 105-Introduction to Communication Studies
  • ENG 102-College Writing II
  • ENG 103-Essentials of Professional and Business Writing (restricted to specific Learning Communities)
  • ENG 230-Writing/Workplace/Public Audiences¬†
  • FMS 116-Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse II (restricted to freshmen only)
  • PHI 115-Practical Reasoning
  • PHI 310-Introduction to Formal Logic
  • PSY 318- Belief in Wierd Things (prerequisite PSY 121)

GSB - Social/Behavioral Science

Category Description: By focusing on a particular discipline which studies the behavior of individuals, groups, or organizations, students learn to use its methodology and theoretical framework to interpret, analyze, and evaluate the broader social contexts of individual events or situations.

This category has a wide variety of options in the following departments: African American Studies, Anthropology, Business, Economics, Geography, Human Development and Family Studies, Public Health, Media Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Special Education Services, Sociology, Social Work, and Women and Gender Studies.

GFL - Foreign Language

If you are starting at the beginning, you will need to take four semesters of foreign language. The course progression is typically 101, 102, 203, 204.

If you already have some foreign language proficiency, you can take a language placement test to start at a higher level course or even waive the course requirement. We have ten languages from which you can choose!

  • American Sign Language
  • Chinese¬†
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Japanese
  • Latin
  • Russian
  • Spanish

Markers (GL, GN, SI, WI)

Marker Descriptions:

Global (GL)
In a course in any subject, students focus on the interconnections among regions of the world, interpret and evaluate information on diverse ecologies, human societies, artistic achievements, or political systems, and gain sensitivity to cultural differences on a global scale.

Global Non-Western (GN)
In a course in any subject, students focus on the interconnections among regions of the world other than North America, Great Britain, and continental Europe, interpret and evaluate information on diverse ecologies, human societies, artiste achievements, or political systems, and gain sensitivity to cultural differences on a global scale.

Speaking Intensive (SI)
In a course in any subject, students receive instruction in an appropriate mode of oral communication (interpersonal or small group communication, or presentational speaking), and enhanced opportunities to practice improvement of oral communication skills.

Writing Intensive (WI)
In a course in any subject, students demonstrate their understanding of its concepts and materials through writing, using constructive criticism from readers to revise drafts and produce one or more clear, coherent, and effective written assignments appropriate to the field.

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