Human Development and Family Studies

Cheryl Buehler, Ph.D.

Professor

Human Development and Family Studies
School of Health and Human Sciences
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
PO Box 26170
Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

cheryl

Phone: (336) 256-0133
Fax: (336) 334-5076

Please take a look at my vita (doc), papers in press and recent publications, and/or e-mail me regarding areas of common interest. 

  * Click on the links below to learn more about my research *

 

       
 

 

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    Ethnicity
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       Research

         Topics

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   Adolescent 

    Problems

 
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Parenting/

 Co-Parenting

Family Life Project

The Family Life Project (FLP) is a 6-year study of the transition from childhood into and through adolescence. The primary focus of the project is to examine how family processes (parenting and marital functioning) influence adolescents’ psychological, social, and academic functioning. The study began in 2001 and data collection was completed in 2008. The last two years of the project focused on teen’s close friendships and dating relationships. 416 two-parent families living in Knox County, Tennessee participated in the project, completing questionnaires each year and discussing relationship patterns among family members in a series of videotaped, semi-structured discussion tasks in their home. We are extremely grateful to these families for their dedication to the project. This project was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH59248).

Mothers’ Part-time Employment Project

The Mother’s Part-time Employment Project (MPEP) is a study of the unique circumstances surrounding mother’s part-time employment. The purpose of the study is to identify conditions under which part-time employment helps mothers’ psychological well-being and parenting and the conditions under which part-time employment has deleterious effects on mothers’ functioning. We are addressing these issues using the NICHD SECCYD national data set. This project currently is funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R03 HD055968). Dr. Marion O’Brien also is an investigator on this project.