HEA 466 COMMUNITY HEALTH INTERVENTIONS II

Course Syllabus, Spring 2005

 

Instructor: Vincent T Francisco, PhD

Department of Public Health Education

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

437 HHP Building, P.O. Box 26170

Greensboro, NC 27402-6170

Voice: 336.334.5520

Fax: 336.334.3238

Email: Vincent_Francisco@uncg.edu

 

Meeting Time: Tuesdays, 8:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Meeting Place: Room 319, HHP Building

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesday, 230pm to 430pm

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

"If you are going to work with small groups and your aim is to change society, and you know that you need masses of people to accomplish that, you have to work with those people who can multiply what you do. It's a matter of having a concept of education that is yeasty, one that will multiply itself."

 

            --Myles Horton

              Founder of the Highlander Folk School

­­­­­_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

This course will provide student participants with a solid background in theory and practice in selecting, developing and implementing community-level interventions to improve the health of individuals and communities.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of the course are to:

1)      Enhance competence among those doing the work of community health and development (e.g., preventing substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, academic failure, child abuse and neglect, violence; promoting child development, youth development, improved housing, healthy lifestyles, economic self-sufficiency, independent living of older adults);

2)      Promote exchange among those doing (and learning about) the work;

3)      Support and improve the effectiveness of local and statewide initiatives for building healthy communities.

 

COURSE LEARNING STRATEGIES AND COMMUNICATION METHODS:

1)      Provide information and "how-to tools" for building healthy communities using the internet-based Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/). The Tool Box provides a free and flexible "textbook". It ensures access to resources for building healthy communities both during and after the course.

2)      Use group problem solving and dialogue about lessons learned to capture and share participants' experience with the work of building healthy communities.

3)      Use the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forums" in BlackBoard to connect participants with each other between course sessions.

 

ACCESS TO COURSE MATERIALS AND REQUIRED READINGS:

There are two required course materials for this class.

  • The primary readings will be from the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/) and will be supplemented with chapters from the required book. While the book chapters do not always follow the themes of each week, they are intended (over the course of the semester) to provoke consideration of broader issues related to action research and community interventions.
  • The book from which supplemental readings will be drawn is: Minkler, M., & Wallerstein, N. (2002). Community-based participatory research for health. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • All other course materials will be available on BlackBoard for the Course (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/). This includes the course syllabus, handouts, and assignments. They may be printed directly from the BlackBoard page or from the Community Tool Box (as appropriate).

 

PREPARATION AND FORMAT FOR CLASS SESSIONS:

Preparation for class sessions:

· Participants complete reading assignments before each session on a featured discussion topic (e.g., community assessment; strategic planning; advocacy; community documentation and evaluation). All primary readings are available using the free, on-line Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/). Each section or module contains information on what, why, when, how-to's, examples, and other resources related to the topic. "Hard" or printed copies can be printed directly from the Tool Box.

· Guidance and Problem-Solving Forum (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/): Participants prepare 4 entries before each session (i.e., one original subject line or "thread" and 3 responses to others' messages). These should relate to the topics for that session.

· On-line take-home quiz: Before the start of each session, students should take a quiz over the reading assignments for that session. To do so, they should connect to the appropriate class session on Blackboard (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) and follow the instructions to take the quiz.

 

During class sessions:

·  Mini-lectures, guided discussion and cooperative learning exercises: Used to build core ideas and skills featured that week (e.g., community leadership; strategic planning).

·  In-class application exercises: Used to practice and connect the skills to local work (e.g., preparing a strategic plan for a local initiative). [Participants will work in teams organized by a shared place (e.g., east Greensboro, Winston-Salem) and/or interest (e.g., neighborhood development, substance abuse; youth violence). Each week's product (e.g., part of a strategic plan) will be integrated into a final group product for the course (i.e., a grant application for a community partnership).]

·  Guidance and Problem-Solving Forum: Based on entries in the online "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum", a group dialogue about problems or issues currently being faced in the work, our experience with the problem, and ideas for dealing with it.

·  Lessons learned: An ongoing dialogue about what we are learning about the work of building healthy communities.

 

Between class sessions:

·         Guidance and Problem Solving Forum (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/): Use the Forum to provide and receive support and guidance in this mutual "learning community." If access to personal computers is a problem, work with other students to get local access.

·         Personal assistance: E-mail or telephone the instructor to get help with questions or issues related to the course. Although e-mail is usually more efficient, give me a call whenever needed at (336) 334-5520.

 

PRODUCT RESULTING FROM PARTICIPATION IN THE COURSE:

·  Grant Application: Each local community team (of about 3-6 people) works together throughout the course to apply the skills to a local issue or concern. [Some possible issues include preventing substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, academic failure, child abuse and neglect, violence; or promoting child development, youth development, healthy lifestyles, economic self-sufficiency, independent living of older adults.] The final product of each team's effort is a "Grant Application for a Community Partnership" to address an issue that matters to the local community. Support will be provided, including relevant reading and practice through application exercises, to prepare draft sections for the teams' grant applications. With adaptation, the grant application can be submitted to a funding agency interested in supporting local partnerships for community health and development.

 

 

THE COURSE OUTLINE FOLLOWS (16 SESSIONS):


 

Session

 Date

Topic

1

1/11

An Introduction to Community Health and Development

 

Content and Learning Objectives

An introduction to the course:

1) Meet the instructor for the course [Self-introduction by the instructor: name, affiliation, hopes for the course]

2) Understand the vision, mission, objectives, and learning strategies for the course

3) Understand the Course Syllabus or road map [Hand out and review the syllabus]

An introduction to participants:

4)      Meet the class members [Self-introductions by participants: name, affiliation, hopes for the course]

An introduction to the topic of building healthy communities

5) Understand the idea of community health and development (e.g., what is it?, why is it important?, some principles, assumptions and values that guide the work)

6) Understand a model for building healthy communities (i.e., an overview of the KU Work Group's model or framework for building healthy communities; its relation to other models; some examples of its application)

7) Review core competencies in the work of building healthy communities

An introduction to the Community Tool Box and related Course Resources

8) Be able to connect to the Course homepage (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/), navigate to sections, and print Course Materials

9) Be able to connect to the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), navigate in the Tool Box, and print Course Reading Assignments from the Tool Box or Course home page

10)   Be able to navigate and contribute to the Guidance and Problem Solving Forum (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/)

11)   Be able to connect by way of phone or e-mail to a course instructor and local resource person for assistance with the course

 

Assignments and Products Due This Session

            1) Participant Form (from each participant)

            2) Problem-Solving Report (from each group)

            3) Lessons Learned (from each group)

 

Want to Know More?

·         Fawcett, S. B., Francisco, V. T., Hyra, D. S., Paine-Andrews, A., Schultz, J. A., Russos, S., Fisher, J. L., & Evensen, P. (1998). Building Healthy Communities. A. Tarlov and R. St. Peter (Eds.) (2000). Society and Population Health. New York: New Press. (adapted and available at http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/EN/section_1002.htm)

·         Fawcett, S.B., Paine-Andrews, A., Francisco, V.T., Schultz, J., Richter, K.P., Lewis, R.K., Williams, E. L., Harris, K., Berkley, J., Fisher, J., and Lopez, C. (1995). Using empowerment theory to support community initiatives for health and development. American Journal of Community Psychology, 23, 667-697.

·         Green, L. W., & Kreuter, M. W. (1991). Health promotion planning: An educational and environmental approach, (2nd ed.), Chapters 4 and 5. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

·         Hawkins, J. D., Catalano, R. F. Jr., & associates. (1992). Communities that care: Action for drug abuse prevention. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.


 

Session

 Date

Topic

2

1/18

Building Community Leadership

 

Content and Learning Objective

         An introduction to community leadership

1) Enhance what we know about community leadership and its core tasks (i.e., envisioning goals, affirming values, motivating, managing, achieving workable unity, explaining, serving as a symbol, representing the group, renewing)

         Assessing and improving your personal effectiveness as a leader

         Applying ideas of leadership to your community initiative

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (2-1)     Chapter 1, Section 3 -- Building Capacity for Community Change

            (2-2)     Chapter 13, Section 1--Developing a Plan for Building Leadership

            (2-3)     Chapter 14, Section 7--Building and Sustaining Relationships

            (2-4)     Chapter 14, Section 1--Learning How to Be a Community Leader

(2-5)     CTB, Toolkit 6, Build Leadership (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(2-6)    Chapter 8: pp. 155-178. Fawcett, S. B., Schultz, J. A., Carson, V. L., Renault, V. A., & Francisco, V. T. (2002). Using Internet-based tools to build capacity for the work of community health and development.

(2-7)    Chapter 12: pp. 242-262. Fadem, P., Minkler, M., Perry, M., Blum, K., Moore, L., & Rogers, J. (2002). Ethical Challenges in Community Based Participatory Research: A Case Study from the San Francisco Bay Area Disability Community.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) Group Product: Grant Application, Part I. D. 4 and G., and Part IV. E. 2. (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

3) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Gardner, J. (1990). On leadership. New York: The Free Press. [See especially: the chapter on "The tasks of leadership" (pp. 11-22)].

·         Heifetz, R. A. (1994). Leadership without easy answers. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 14 Core Functions of Leadership


 

Session

 Date

Topic

3

1/25

Group Facilitation

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to facilitating the work of people in groups

1) Understand important skill areas related to group leadership: facilitating group meetings and recording products of meetings

         An orientation to the grant application (due from each team at the end of the course)

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (3-1)     Chapter 16, Section 2--Developing Facilitation Skills

            (3-2)     Chapter 16, Section 3--Capturing What People Say: Tips for Recording a Meeting

            (3-3)     Chapter 16, Section 1--Conducting Effective Meetings

            (3-4)     Chapter 42, Section 4--Applying for a Grant: The General Approach

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(3-5)    Chapter 6: pp. 113-130. Sullivan, M., Chao, S. S., Allen, C. A., Kone, A., Pierre-Louis, M., & Krieger, J. Community-Researcher Partnerships: Perspectives from the Field.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercises: "Facilitating Group Activities" (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

3) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Auvine, B., Dinsmore, B., Extrom, M., Poole, S., Shanklin, M. (1978). A manual for group facilitators. Madison, WI: The Center for Conflict Resolution.

·         Bobo, K., Kendall, J., Max, S., (1991). A manual for activists in the 1990s. Cabin John, MD: Seven Locks Press.

·         Nelson-Jones, R. (1992). Group leadership: A training approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

·         Quinlivan-Hall, D., & Renner, P. (1994). In search of solutions: 60 ways to guide your problem-solving group. San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer.

·         Schwarz, R.M. (1994). The skilled facilitator: practical wisdom for developing effective groups. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 14—Core Functions of Leadership, Chapter 42: Getting Grants and Financial Resources

 


 

Session

 Date

Topic

4

2/1

Community Assessment, Information Gathering, and Listening: Part I

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to community assessment

         Identifying issues that matter to local people

         Determining the level of the problem

         Describing your community

         Applying community assessment techniques to your community initiative

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (4-1)     Chapter 3, Section 3--Conducting Public Forums and Listening Sessions

            (4-2)     Chapter 3, Section 4--Collecting Information about the Problem

(4-3)          Chapter 3, Section 2--Understanding and Describing the Community

(4-4)        Chapter 3, Section 12--Conducting Interviews

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(4-5)    Part Three: pp. 131-133. Identifying Strengths and Selecting Issues with Communities.

(4-6)    Chapter 7: pp. 135-154. Minkler, M., & Hancock, T. Community-Driven Asset Identification and Issue Selection.

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) Prepare before class: Find health data (e.g., information on incidence and prevalence of youth violence or child abuse) in your local library, health department, or the Internet. [We will use these data for the in-class exercise.]

Useful URL's:

Guilford County Health Department: http://www.co.guilford.nc.us/government/publichealth/index.asp

North Carolina Child Advocacy Institute data: http://www.ncchild.org/data.htm

North Carolina Public Health: http://www.ncpublichealth.com/

3) In-class application exercises: "Conduct a Listening Session" and "Assessing the Incidence and Prevalence of the Problem"

4) Group Product: Grant Application, Part I. B. and C., Part II. A. 1-3, 5; Part II. B. 1-2 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            5) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

Want to Know More?

·         Berkowitz, W. R. (1982). Community impact. Cambridge, MA: Schenkman Publishing Company, Inc.

·         Durch, J. S., Bailey, L. A., & Stoto, M. A. (1997). Improving Health in the Community: A Role for Performance Monitoring. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

·         Morgan, David L. (Ed.). (1993). Successful focus groups: Advancing the state of the art. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

·         Spradley, J.S. (1979). The ethnographic interview. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 3--Assessing Community Needs and Resources


 

Session

 Date

Topic

5

2/8

Community Assessment, Information Gathering, and Listening: Part II

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to assessing community needs, assets and resources

         Identifying community assets and resources through Assets Mapping

         Using Assets Mapping with community initiatives

         Determining the level of the problem

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (5-1)     Chapter 3, Section 1--Developing a Plan for Identifying Local Needs and Resources

            (5-2)     Chapter 3, Section 7--Conducting Needs Assessment Surveys

(5-3)          Chapter 3, Section 8--Identifying Community Assets

(5-4)          Chapter 14, Section 4--Understanding People's Needs

(5-5)          CTB, Toolkit 2, Assessing Needs and Resources (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(5-6)    Chapter 9: pp. 179-196. Wang, C. Using Photovoice as a Participatory Assessment and Issue Selection Tool: A Case Study with the Homeless in Ann Arbor.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session    

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Planning a Needs Assessment" and "Developing a Community Assets Map"

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Part I. D. 2 and 6, Part II. A. 1-5, Part IV. C. 1-3 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Feldman, J.G. (1981). Indices of community health. In D.W. Clark & B. MacMahon, (Eds.), Preventative and community medicine. (pp.37-57). Boston, MA: Little Brown and Co.

·         Kretzmann, J. P. & McKnight, J. (1993). Building communities from the inside out: A path toward finding and mobilizing a community's assets. Evanston, IL: Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research.

·         Soriano, F. (1995). Conducting needs assessments. Thousands Oaks, CA: Sage

·         Witkin, B.R. and Altschuld, J.W. (1995). Planning and conducting needs assessment: A practical guide. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

·         KDHE, Bureau of Health Promotion. (1999). Health Risk Behaviors of Kansans, 1997. Topeka, KS.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 3--Assessing Community Needs and Resource

 


 

Session

 Date

Topic

6

2/15

Analyzing the Issue or Problem

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to problem solving

         Analyzing and identifying "root" causes of the problem

         Naming and framing selected issues and problems

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (6-1)     Chapter 17, Section 3--Defining and Analyzing the Problem

            (6-2)     Chapter 17, Section 6--Generating and Choosing Solutions

            (6-3)     Chapter 17, Section 7--Putting Your Solutions into Practice

            (6-4)     Chapter 17, Section 4—The “But Why?” Technique

            (6-5)     Chapter 32, Section 5--Reframing the Debate

(6-6)     CTB, Toolkit 3, Analyzing Problems and Goals (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(6-7)    Chapter 11: pp. 221-241. Farquhar, S. A., & Wing, S. Methodological and Ethical Considerations in Community-Driven Environmental Justice Research: Two Case Studies from Rural North Carolina.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: the "But Why" method

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Part I, B and D. 2, Part II. A. 1, 4, 5; Part II. C. 1 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

 

Want to Know More?

·         Quinlivan-Hall, D., & Renner, P. (1994). In search of solutions: 60 ways to guide your problem-solving group, Chapter 6. San Diego, CA: Pfeiffer.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 18--Deciding Where to Start, Chapter 19—Choosing and Adapting Community Interventions

 


 

Session

 Date

Topic

7

2/22

Strategic Planning I: Outlining a Vision, Mission, and Objectives

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Developing a vision statement

         Developing a mission statement

         Creating objectives

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(7-1)     Chapter 8, Section 1—VMOSA (Vision, Mission, Objectives, Strategies, Action Plan): An Overview

            (7-2)     Chapter 8, Section 2--Proclaiming Your Dream: Developing Vision and Mission Statements

            (7-3)     Chapter 8, Section 3--Creating Objectives

(7-4)     CTB, Toolkit 5, Developing Strategic and Action Plans (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(7-5)    Chapter 14: pp. 293-315. Schulz, A. J., Israel, B. A., Parker, E. A., Lockett, M., Hill, Y. R., & Wills, R. Engaging Women in Community Based Participatory Research for Health: The East Side Village Health Worker Partnership.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session    

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) Group Products: Grant application, Part I. A and D. 1, Part III. A. 1-2 and B. 1-2 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

3) On-line take-home quiz. (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Bryson, J. M. (1988). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: A guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

·         Fawcett, S. B., Paine-Andrews, A., et al. (1993). Preventing adolescent pregnancy: An action planning guide for community- based initiatives. Lawrence, KS: KU Work Group on Health Promotion and Community Development, University of Kansas. [Other guides are available on adolescent substance abuse, child abuse, youth violence, chronic disease, and health of older adults.]

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 8--Developing a Strategic Plan

 


 

Session

 Date

Topic

8

3/1

Strategic Planning II: Identifying Targets, Developing Strategies and an Action Plan

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Identifying targets of change (those experiencing the problem) and agents of change (those who can do something about it)

         Developing strategies

         Developing an action plan

 

Reading Assignments  

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

            (8-1)     Chapter 18, Section 3--Identifying Targets and Agents of Change: Who Can Benefit and Who Can Help

            (8-2)     Chapter 8, Section 4--Developing Successful Strategies: Planning to Win

            (8-3)     Chapter 8, Section 5--Developing an Action Plan

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(8-4)    Chapter 15: pp. 316-331. Cheatham, A., & Shen, E. Community Based Participatory Research with Cambodian Girls in Long Beach, California: A Case Study.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session    

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) Group Products: Grant application, Part IV. A. 1-4, D. 1, and E. 1 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            3) On-line take-home quiz. (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Bryson, J. M. (1988). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: A guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 8--Developing a Strategic Plan, Chapter 18--Deciding Where to Start

 

 

 

------------SPRING BREAK 3/5 to 14-------------

 


 


Session

 Date

Topic

9

3/15

Collaboration, Negotiation, and Cultural Competence

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Introduction to collaboration, negotiation and cultural competence

1) Understand collaboration (and related aspects such as networking, coordination, cooperation, and negotiation) as one of several strategies for working together to address community issues

         Assessing and enhancing collaboration

         Building cultural competence

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(9-1)     Chapter 24, Section 3—Relationships Among Organizations: Promoting Networking, Coordination, Cooperative Agreements, and Collaborative Arrangements

            (9-2)     Chapter 24, Section 4--Developing Multi-sector Collaborations

(9-3)          Chapter 18, Section 1—Designing an Intervention

(9-4)        Chapter 27, Section 1--Understanding Culture and Diversity in Building Communities

(9-5)        CTB, Toolkit 9, Enhancing Cultural Competence (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(9-6)    Chapter 4: pp. 81-97. Chavez, V., Duran, B., Baker, Q. E., Avila, M. M., & Wallerstein, N. The Dance of Race and Privilege in Community Based Participatory Research.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercises: "Collaborating with Local Agencies or Organizations" and "Building Cultural Competence"

3) Group Products: Grant application, Part I. F., Part IV. B. 1-2, C. 1-3 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Alter, C., and Hage, J. (1993). Organizations working together. Newbury Park, CA: Sage

·         Bennis, W., and Biederman, P.W. (1997). Organizing genius: The secrets of creative collaboration. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing.

·         Gonzalez, V.M. (1991). Health promotion in diverse cultural communities. Palo Alto, CA Health Promotion Resource Center, Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention.

·         Rivera, F. (1992). Community organizing in a diverse society. Needham Heights, MA. Allyn & Bacon.

·         US Department of Health and Human Services. (1994). Communications: Technical assistance bulletins: You can use communications principles to create culturally sensitive and effective prevention materials.

·         US Department of Health and Human Services. (1993). Cultural competence guidelines: following specific guidelines will help you assess cultural competence in program design, application, and management. Rockville, MD: CSAP Communications Team.

·         Community Tool Box, Chapter 27--Cultural Competence in a Multi-Cultural World

 


Session

 Date

Topic

10

3/22

Intervention, Program Development, and Implementation

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Identifying personal and environmental factors that contribute to risks or protection

         Identifying components and elements of the intervention (e.g., information and skill building, modifying barriers and access, modifying incentives and disincentives)

         Delivering the intervention through collaborating community sectors (e.g., schools, health organizations, religious organizations)

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(10-1)   Chapter 19, Section 2--Understanding Risk and Protective Factors: A Tool for Selecting Ingredients for Community Health and Development Issues

(10-2)      Chapter 19, Section 3--Identifying Strategies and Tactics for Reducing Risks

(10-3)      Chapter 18, Section 1--Designing an Intervention

(10-4)      CTB, Toolkit 7. Develop an Intervention (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Identifying Program Components and Elements." This will produce a table of program components and elements that outline the intervention, targets and agents of change, and the context under which the program will be implemented.

            3) Group Products: Grant application, Part II. C. 2; Part IV. D. 1 and E. 1-2 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Green, L. W., & Kreuter, M. W. (1991). Health promotion planning: An educational and environmental approach, (2nd ed.), Chapters 4 and 5. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

·         Hawkins, J. D., Catalano, R. F. Jr., & associates. (1992). Communities that care: Action for drug abuse prevention. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

·         Paine-Andrews, A., Vincent, M. C., Fawcett, S.B., Campuzano, M. K., Harris, K. J., Lewis, R. K., Williams, E. L., and Fisher, J. L. (1996). Replicating a community initiative for preventing adolescent pregnancy: From South Carolina to Kansas. Family and Community Health, 19, 14-30.

·         Price, R. H. & Lorion, R. P. (1989). Prevention programming as organizational reinvention: From research to implementation. In D. Shaffer, I. Philips, & N.B. Enzer (Eds.), Prevention of mental disorders, alcohol and other drug use in children and adolescents. (pp. 97-123). Office of Substance Abuse Prevention and American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Prevention Monograph #2, (DHHS Publication No. ADM 89-1646). Rockville, MD.

·         Committee on Prevention and Mental Disorders, Institute of Medicine. (1995). Designing, conducting, and analyzing programs within the preventive intervention research cycle. In P. J. Mrazek, and R. J. Haggerty (Eds.), Reducing risk for mental disorders. (pp 359-414). Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 19—Choosing and Adapting Community Interventions


 

Session

 Date

Topic

 

11

3/29

Community Organization and Advocacy

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Community organizing

         Advocating for community change

         Assessing (and improving) your personal effectiveness as a leader

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(11-1)   Chapter 1, Section 7--Some Lessons on Community Organization and Change

(11-2)   Chapter 30, Section 1--Overview: Getting an Advocacy Campaign Off the Ground           

(11-3)   Chapter 30, Section 5--Survival Skills for Community Advocates

(11-4)   Chapter 35, Section 1—Overview of Opposition Tactics: Recognizing the 10 D’s

(11-5)   Chapter 30, Section 7--Developing a Plan for Advocacy

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(11-6)  Chapter 17: pp. 349-370. Themba, M. N., & Minkler, M. Influencing Policy Through Community Based Participatory Research.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) Group Products: Use this to adjust the Grant Application, Part IV. A 1-2, B 1-2, D 1, and E 1 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            3) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

4) Product: Plan for enhancing your personal effectiveness as a community leader [Course handout based on Stephen Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.] (Due by session time)

 

Want to Know More?

·         CTB, Toolkit 10. Advocate for Change. (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

·         Rothman, J. & Tropman, J. E. (1987). Models of community organization and macro practice perspectives: Their mixing and phasing. In F. E. Cox et al., (Eds.), Strategies of community organization: Macro practice. (pp. 3-26). Itasca, IL: F. E. Peacock Publishers.

·         Altman, D. G., Balcazar, F. E., Fawcett, S. B., Seekins, T., and Young, J. Q. (1994). Public health advocacy : Creating community change to improve health. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention.

·         Wallack, L., Dorfman, L., Jernigan, D., and Themba, M. (1993). Media advocacy and public health. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 30—Principles of Advocacy; Chapter 33--Conducting a Direct Action Campaign; Chapter 34--Media Advocacy; and Chapter 35--Responding to Counterattacks


 

Session

 Date

Topic

12

4/5

Evaluating and Documenting Community Initiatives: Part I

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to evaluating community initiatives

         Examining process through surveys and interviews

         Documenting and reporting intermediate outcomes

          Understanding and improving an intervention or program through evaluation of process, intermediate outcomes, and more distant outcomes

Reading Assignments:

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(12-1)      Chapter 36, Section 6—Developing an Evaluation Plan

(12-2)      Chapter 1, Section 4--Evaluating Comprehensive Community Initiatives

(12-2)   Chapter 38, Section 1--Measuring Success: Evaluating Community Health Initiatives

(12-3)   Chapter 38, Section 2--Gathering Information: Monitoring Your Progress

(12-4)   Chapter 38, Section 4--Rating Member Satisfaction

(12-5)   Chapter 38, Section 8--Interviews with Key Participants: Analysis of Critical Events

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(12-6)  Part Four: pp. 197-200. Methodological and Ethical Considerations in Planning and Conducting Community Based Participatory Research.

(12-7)  Chapter 10: pp. 201-220. Bradbury, H., & Reason, P. Issues and Choice Points for Improving the Quality of Action Research.

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Developing and Assessing an Evaluation of a Community Intervention (Part 1)"

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Part V. A. 1-3, B. 1-4, and C. 3 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

Want to Know More?

·         CTB, Toolkit 12, Evaluate the Initiative. (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

·         Fawcett, S. B., Paine-Andrews, A., Francisco, V. T., Schultz, J. A., Richter, K. P., Berkley Patton, J., Fisher, J. L., Lewis, R. K., Lopez, C. M., Russos, S. Williams, E. L., Harris, K. J., & Evensen, P. (in press). Evaluating community health initiatives. In I. Rootman, D. McQueen, et al. (Eds.), Evaluating health promotion approaches. Copenhagen, Denmark: World Health Organization-Europe.

·         Green, L.W., & Kreuter, M.W. (1991). Evaluation and the accountable practitioner. Health promotion planning, (2nd Ed.), (pp. 215-260). Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company.

·         Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation. (1994). The program evaluation standards. Evaluation Practice, 15, 334-336.

·         Fawcett, S.B., Paine-Andrews, A. L., Francisco, V. T., Schultz, J. A., Richter, K. P., Lewis, R. K., Harris, K. J., Williams, E. L., Berkley, J. Y., Lopez, C. M., and Fisher, J. L. (1995). Empowering community health initiatives through evaluation. In D. M. Fetterman, S. J. Kaftarian, and A. Wandersman (Eds.), Empowerment evaluation: Knowledge and tools for self-assessment and accountability. (pp. 161-187). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.


 

Session

 Date

Topic

13

4/12

Evaluating and Documenting Community Initiatives: Part II

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Identifying, measuring, and reporting community-level indicators and more distant outcomes

         Using data to answer evaluation questions, improve program functioning, communicate accomplishments, and make overall sense of an initiative

 

Reading Assignments

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(13-1)   Chapter 36, Section 1--A Framework for Program Evaluation

(13-2)   Chapter 38, Section 7--Behavioral Surveys

(13-2)   Chapter 38, Section 9—Gathering and Using Community-Level Indicators

(13-3)   Chapter 39, Section 1--Using the Evaluation System to Answer Key Questions About the Initiative

(13-4)   Chapter 39, Section 2--Providing Feedback to Improve the Initiative

(13-5)   Chapter 39, Section 4--Communicating Information About the Initiative to Gain Support From Key Audiences

 

Other Assignments and Products Due This Session

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Developing and Assessing an Evaluation of a Community Intervention (Part 2)"

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Part V. C. 1-2, 4-5 (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

 

Want to Know More?

·         Fawcett, Lewis, et al. (in press). Evaluating coalitions to prevent substance abuse: The case of Project Freedom. Health Education and Behavior.

·         Berkowitz, William. (1982). Community impact: Creating grassroots change in hard times. Cambridge, MA: Schenkman Publishing Company, Inc.

·         Cox, Fred, et al. (Eds.) (1984). Tactics and techniques of community practice. Itasca, IL: F.E. Peacock Publishers, Inc.

·         Fawcett, S.B., Paine-Andrews, A., Francisco, V.T., Schultz, J.A., Richter, K.P., Lewis, R.K., Williams, E.L., Harris, K.J., Berkley, J.Y., Fisher, J.L., & Lopez, C.M. (1994). Work Group evaluation handbook: Evaluating and supporting community initiatives for health and development. Lawrence, KS: Work Group on Health Promotion and Community Development, University of Kansas.


 

Session

 Date

Topic

14

4/19

Social Marketing

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         An introduction to social marketing

         Marketing the overall initiative

 

Reading Assignment:

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(14-1)   Chapter 45, Section 1--Understanding Social Marketing: Learning to Change People's Behaviors

(14-2)   Chapter 45, Section 4--Managing a Social Marketing Effort

(14-3)   Toolkit 13, Implement a Social Marketing Effort (http://ctb.ku.edu/tools/corecompetencies.jsp)

From Minkler & Wallerstein, 2002:

(14-4)  Chapter 3: pp. 53-76. Israel, B. A., Schulz, A. J., Parker, E. A., Becker, A. B., Allen A. J., & Guzman, J. R. Critical Issues in Developing and Following Community Based Participatory Research Principles.

 

Other Assignments and Products Due for this Session:          

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Social Marketing"

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Part IV. A. through E. revised and completed to include social marketing principles (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

            4) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

           

Want to Know More?

·         Andreason, A. (1995). Marketing social change: Changing behavior to promote health, social development, and the environment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

·         Endres, J. (1991). Institutionalization: Giving programs a permanent base. How to guides for community health promotion. Palo Alto, CA: Health Promotion Resource Center, Stanford University.

·         Lefebvre, R.C. (1990). Strategies to maintain and institutionalize successful programs: A marketing framework. In N. Bracht (Ed.), Health promotion at the community level. (pp. 209-228). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

·         Steckler, A. & Goodman, R.M. (1989). How to institutionalize health promotion programs. American Journal of Health Promotion, 3(4), 34-44.

·         Rogers, E.M. (1983). The change agent. In E.M. Rogers, Diffusion of innovations (3rd ed.), (pp. 312-346). New York: The Free Press.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 45—Social Marketing of Successful Components of the Intervention, Chapter 46--Planning for Long-term Institutionalization

 


 

Session

 Date

Topic

15

4/26

Institutionalization

 

Content and Learning Objectives

         Institutionalizing the initiative

 

Reading Assignment:

From the Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/):

(15-1) Chapter 46, Section 1--Developing a Plan for Institutionalization of the Initiative

(15-2) Chapter 46, Section 3--Promoting Adoption of the Initiatives Mission and Objectives

(15-3) Chapter 46, Section 2--Strategies for Maintaining Financial Sustainability

(15-4) Chapter 1, Section 6--Working Together for Healthier Communities

 

Other Assignments and Products Due for this Session:

1) For this session, prepare four entries into the "Guidance and Problem Solving Forum" (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) -- one new original thread and three responses. (Due by the start of this session).

2) In-class application exercise: "Planning for Institutionalization"

3) Group Products: Grant Application, Budget Form, Part VI. A. and B., Part VII. (Due to Instructor by 3:00pm the next day).

4) (For graduate students enrolled in HDFL 710) White paper on building healthy communities

            5) On-line take-home quiz (Due before the start of the session).

           

Want to Know More?

·         Andreason, A. (1995). Marketing social change: Changing behavior to promote health, social development, and the environment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

·         Endres, J. (1991). Institutionalization: Giving programs a permanent base. How to guides for community health promotion. Palo Alto, CA: Health Promotion Resource Center, Stanford University.

·         Lefebvre, R.C. (1990). Strategies to maintain and institutionalize successful programs: A marketing framework. In N. Bracht (Ed.), Health promotion at the community level. (pp. 209-228). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.

·         Steckler, A. & Goodman, R.M. (1989). How to institutionalize health promotion programs. American Journal of Health Promotion, 3(4), 34-44.

·         Rogers, E.M. (1983). The change agent. In E.M. Rogers, Diffusion of innovations (3rd ed.), (pp. 312-346). New York: The Free Press.

·         Community Tool Box (http://ctb.ku.edu/), Chapter 45—Social Marketing of Successful Components of the Intervention, Chapter 46--Planning for Long-term Institutionalization


 

Session

 Date

Topic

16

5/3

Lessons, Closing Insights, and Next Steps

 

Assignments due today:

 

1) Course insights (4-page report based on highlights from the semester's Guidance and Problem Solving Forum)

2) Final draft of the Grant Application for a Community Partnership (group)

3) Ratings of individual contribution to group Grant Application

 


Course Requirements and Policies

 

            Course requirements include reading and in-class discussion, keeping a weekly journal, in-class application exercises, exploring personal attributes that enhance effectiveness as a community leader, and a team (group) project on preparing a grant application for a community partnership.

 

            All written assignments should be sent by FAX or preferably as an email or email attachment to Instructor.

 

A description of each type of assignment follows:

 

(1)    Class participation. All course participants are expected to be knowledgeable and active members of each learning site. Regular attendance and the quantity and quality of participation will be used to assign a grade for participants.

 

(2)    Guidance and Problem Solving Forum. To prepare for each session, each participant writes 4 entries for his or her submission to the forum (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/). For each session, entries are prepared before the session (1-2 paragraphs per entry). Forum entries are due by the start of each session. Forum entries will be reviewed and graded with selective comments by the instructors. Of the entries each session, at least one message should pose an original subject line (or thread) based on the questions provided and readings for that session, and the other 3 should provide responses to subject lines (or "threads") introduced by others in the class.

 

(3)    Group product(s) for each session. During each session, participants will work in small groups and use the session's ideas to prepare a group product related to the Community Grant Application (e.g., part of a strategic plan). Each member receives the group's collective grade for the product. A copy of all products should be given to (e. g., FAXED, or handed) to Instructor, by 3 p.m. the day after the session they were produced.

 

(4)    On-line (take-home) quiz. Before the start of each session, participants should take a quiz over the reading assignments for that session. To do so, they should connect to the appropriate class session on the Course home page (http://blackboard.uncg.edu/) and follow the instructions to take a quiz. Students should complete this individually (and without help from others). This is a take-home quiz in which students may use their readings and notes to find or check their answers.

 

(5)    Exploration of personal effectiveness. Each participant will reflect on attributes that enable people to be effective contributors to community health and development efforts (as well as other areas of work and life). This reflection is guided by a set of questions (based on Stephen Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People). The questions invite you to explore a variety of issues related to personal vision, communication, cooperation, and renewal. The assignment should be approximately 4 single-spaced typewritten pages.

 

(6)    Grant application for a community partnership (team). Working as a team, participants will complete a grant application to address an issue or concern of importance to a local community.

 

(7)    Rating of individual contribution to the Grant Application. At mid-term and at the end of the semester, all participants provide a rating (10 point scale; 10 being the highest) for each member of the grant application team.

 

(8)    Lessons Learned. Throughout the semester, we ask that students contribute Lessons Learned that includes insights gained from the readings, class discussions, and group projects. A two-page summary of highlights from these insights is due on the last session. The course will conclude with a discussion of these insights.

 

COURSE GRADE: The course assignments and point values follow:

 

(1) Class attendance and participation

 

(16 points)

(2) Guidance and Problem Solving Forum

 

(14 weeks X 4 points each set = 56 points)

(3) Group products and application exercises

 

(14 weeks X 4 points each set = 56 points)

(4) On-line take home quizzes

 

(14 weeks X 4 points each set = 56 points)

(5) Exploration of personal effectiveness

 

(30 points) Due 4/3

(6) Grant application (group)

 

(50 points) Due 5/1

(7) Rating of individual contribution to group Grant Application

 

(10 points) Due 3/15 and 5/3

(8) Course insights

 

(10 points) Due 5/3

 

Total

294 points

 

Late Assignments: Late assignments will result in an automatic 10% reduction in possible points. Assignments will not be accepted more than one week after the due date, except for extreme circumstances which need to be discussed with me individually. Final grades will be computed using standard percentages (i.e., A = 90-100% of the maximum number of points; B = 80-89%; and so on), as follows:

A

274 to 294 cumulative points

A-

265 to 273 cumulative points

B+

256 to 264 cumulative points

B

248 to 255 cumulative points

B-

235 to 247 cumulative points

C+

229 to 234 cumulative points

C

216 to 228 cumulative points

C-

206 to 215 cumulative points

D+

227 to 205 cumulative points

D

189 to 226 cumulative points

D-

176 to 188 cumulative points

F

Anything below 176 points

 

Collaboration Between Class Members: Class members are encouraged to collaborate with each other to discuss and reflect on class assignments. We urge you to form partnerships or study groups for this purpose.

 

A Note on Academic Misconduct: Except for the collaboratively produced grant proposal and weekly assignments, all individual written assignments must be the student's original work. The collaboratively produced grant proposal and weekly assignments must be the original work of the group itself. I do not anticipate any problems of academic misconduct.

 

Academic misconduct by a student shall include, but not be limited to, disruption of classes, giving or receiving of unauthorized aid on examinations, reports or other assignments, knowingly misrepresenting the source of any academic work, falsification of research results, plagiarizing of another's work, violation of regulations or ethical codes for the treatment of human subjects, or otherwise acting dishonestly in research.

 

Should I suspect an instance of academic misconduct; the student will be informed of the infraction and the penalty to be imposed. If appropriate, the matter will be forwarded to the departmental chairperson and Dean of the School for mediation. Potential sanctions include a warning, an admonition, and censure, reduction of grade (including a grade of F for the course), disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion.

 

UNCG Academic Integrity Policy. Academic integrity is important to success at UNCG and in later life.  Academic integrity is based on five values: honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility.  If you are to fully benefit from this class and be properly evaluated for your contributions, we must work together in an environment that affirms these values.  Work that violates these values is incompatible with the goals of this class and will not be tolerated.  Every member of the class is expected to foster the spirit of academic honesty at all times and to encourage that spirit among others.

 

Members of this class are encouraged to review the University’s Academic Integrity Policy on-line at http://studentconduct.uncg.edu/policy/academicintegrity/ or in the UNCG Student Calendar/Handbook. I encourage you to discuss the meaning of academic integrity with one another and with me. If any work or assignment appears unclear or presents questions related to academic integrity, I urge you to talk with me to obtain further clarification.

 

I invite you, as a student in this class to join me in supporting the Academic Integrity Policy.  Including and signing the Academic Integrity Pledge below for all major work submitted in this class will signal a clear indication of your support.

 

Academic Integrity Pledge: I have abided by the Academic Integrity Policy on this assignment.

 

_______________________________________________  ______________

Signature                                                                                  Date