Department of Psychology

Elizabeth Duffy Awards

The Elizabeth Duffy Graduate Scholarship was established to be awarded annually to a female doing graduate work in the Department of Psychology. It was named in honor of Dr. Elizabeth Duffy, an alum of UNCG (then, the Women’s College of UNC), who earned her MA from Columbia University and her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University (at age 24). Dr. Duffy served with distinction on the Psychology faculty at UNCG for 30 years, as well as President of Division I of APA, and is best known for her theoretical writings on motivation and emotion as viewed in terms of energy mobilization, arousal, and activation.

 

2010-2011

Jessie Moore

Jessica Kaczorowski

Beatrice Kuhlmann

Irina Babik

 

2011-2012

Madelynn Druhen Shell is a rising fifth year student in the doctoral program in developmental psychology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Ms. Shell received her undergraduate degree in psychology with great distinction from McGill University in Montreal, Canada.  The results of her undergraduate thesis on infants’ understanding of the correspondence between speech and human faces were published in a peer reviewed journal and presented in a conference symposium.  After college, she worked for a year as a research assistant at UNCG on Dr. Heidi Gazelle’s NIMH-funded longitudinal project, the Youth Wellness Project. Following this year, Ms. Shell enrolled in the developmental psychology graduate program at UNCG in 2007. She completed her master’s degree in August 2009 and her preliminary examination in May 2010. She successfully defended her dissertation proposal in May of 2011, and is currently analyzing her doctoral dissertation data. She received a prestigious UNCG Hayes Fellowship in 2008 as well as summer stipend awards in 2008 and 2010. Ms. Shell’s program of research examines the interactions between child behavioral characteristics and environmental factors in predicting socially withdrawn (anxious solitary) children’s peer relationships. Her master’s thesis involved sequential analyses of observations of child and peer behavior in anxious solitary and non-anxious solitary third grad children. These analyses aimed to establish whether anxious solitary children’s poor peer relationships result from child- or peer-driven mechanisms. Results suggested that anxious solitary children responded more sensitively to negative peer treatments, although they also respond very positively when peers treat them positively. In addition, results suggest that anxious solitary children may receive more negative peer treatments, in part because they engage in more solitary behaviors, which lead to peer exclusion for both shy and non-shy children. In her doctoral dissertation, Ms. Shell will be analyzing how environmental transitions affect anxious solitary children’s peer relationships. Children were assessed longitudinally from third to seventh grade, with a transition from elementary to middle school in the fall of sixth grade. Growth curve analyses will be used to assess whether anxious solitary children experience more dramatic increases in negative peer treatments, compared to their non-anxious solitary peers, as a result of the transition to middle school. These findings may have implications for peer- and school-level interventions that could improve shy children’s social relationships. Since her arrival at UNCG, Ms. Shell has published two articles in peer-reviewed journals, has been invited to resubmit the article based on her thesis, has one manuscript under review, has presented at premier research conferences, and has submitted an external grant application to fund her research.

 

Molly Armistead Walsh is a rising 5th year student in the doctoral program in clinical psychology at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Ms. Walsh received her undergraduate degree in psychology with high distinction from the University of Michigan. After college, she worked for two years as a study coordinator on a federally funded research project at the Harvard University/ Massachusetts General Hospital Bipolar Research Program.  Ms. Walsh enrolled in the clinical psychology graduate program at UNCG in 2007. She completed her master’s degree in May 2010 and her preliminary examination in March 2011, and is currently beginning work on her doctoral dissertation.  She received a prestigious UNCG Hayes Fellowship in 2008 and her master’s thesis was awarded the UNCG Outstanding Thesis Award in 2011. Ms. Walsh’s program of research examines the development, expression, and classification of bipolar spectrum psychopathology.  Her thesis was a sophisticated assessment of bipolar psychopathology that involved interview and questionnaire assessments, as well as the use of experience sampling methodology to assess participants’ experiences in daily life. Experience sampling is a daily assessment procedure in which participants were given palm pilots for one week that randomly signaled them eight times daily to complete brief questionnaires regarding their current thoughts, affect, and behaviors.  Her study represented a truly novel integration of measurement methods and the results provided construct validation in the laboratory and in daily life for a broader spectrum of bipolar psychopathology that extends beyond the clinical boundaries of our current diagnostic systems. These findings have important basic and applied implications. Specifically, the identification of subclinical bipolar psychopathology should enhance our understanding of the etiology of such disorders, provide the basis for identifying risk and protective factors, and ultimately facilitate the development of prophylactic treatment interventions. Ms. Walsh’s doctoral dissertation is a three-year longitudinal study of the development of bipolar disorders using the sample that was assessed in her thesis. Since her arrival at UNCG, Ms. Walsh has published one article in a peer-reviewed journal, has three other manuscripts under review, has presented at premier research conferences, and has submitted an external grant application to fund her research.