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Biology Courses (BIO)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Courses for Undergraduates

105 Major Concepts of Biology (3:3)

GE Core: GNS

CAR: GLS

For students not planning to take additional biology courses.

Students who have prior credit for BIO 111, 112 may not take BIO 105 for credit.

Introduction to major concepts in biology. Topic sections emphasize specific areas including conservation biology, biotechnology, and current issues. Survey sections emphasize basic aspects of biology, including genetics, physiology and ecology. (Fall & Spring)

105L Major Concepts of Biology Laboratory (1:0:2)

GE Core: GNS

CAR: GLS

Pr. or Coreq. concurrent enrollment in BIO 105 or previous credit for 105

For students not planning to take additional biology courses

Students who have prior credit for BIO 111, 112 may not take BIO 105L for credit.

Designed to acquaint non-science majors with basic laboratory practices and major ideas in biology, including function of cells, the human body, mechanisms of heredity, ecology, and evolution. (Fall & Spring)

111 Principles of Biology I (4:3:3)

GE Core: GNS

CAR: GLS

Coreq. BIO 111L

Prerequisite for most other biology courses. Lecture and laboratory cover the fundamental principles of biology including the molecular and cellular basis of life, genetics, and biotechnology. A passing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion of this course. (Fall & Spring)

112 Principles of Biology II (4:3:3)

GE Core: GNS

CAR: GLS

Pr. grade of C- or better in 111

Coreq. BIO 112L

Prerequisite for 300-level courses and above. Continuation of 111 and includes laboratory. Fundamental principles of biology including botany, zoology, evolution, and ecology. A passing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion of this course. (Fall & Spring)

271 Human Anatomy (4:3:3)

Pr. a grade of C- or better in BIO 111

Human anatomy with study of skeletons, models, and anatomical preparations. Includes dissection of cat.

277 Human Physiology (4:3:3)

Pr. a grade of C- or better in BIO 111 and high school chemistry with grade of C or better

Human physiology with emphasis on homeostatic mechanisms.

280 Fundamentals of Microbiology (4:3:4)

Pr. a grade of C- or better in BIO 111, and successful completion of either 271 or 277

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 481.

General survey of microscopic life and its impact on medicine, public health, and the environment. Includes laboratory work with bacteria, emphasizing aseptic technique.

301 Principles of Ecology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Introduction to fundamentals of ecology. Principles relating to populations, communities and ecosystems. Particular emphasis placed on the many dimensions of interdependence within ecosystems. (Fall & Spring)

302 Introductory Ecology Laboratory (1:0:4)

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 301

Laboratory course to accompany BIO 301. Several field trips. (Fall & Spring)

322 Plant Diversity (4:3:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Coreq. BIO 322L

Lecture and laboratory are introduction to the plant, fungi, and protista kingdoms. Emphasis is on structure, reproduction, and life cycles of the organisms. A passing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion of this course. (Fall)

341 Invertebrate Zoology (4:3:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Major invertebrate groups with emphasis on ecology, physiology, evolution, and structural adaptations of representative types. Weekend coastal field trip required. (Spring)

354 Plant Systematics (4:3:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Coreq. BIO 354L

Lecture and laboratory are introduction to the classification and evolution of vascular plants. The principles of classification and characteristics of selected plant families are emphasized. A passing grade in lecture must be achieved for successful completion of this course. (Spring)

355 Cell Biology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112, and CHE 114 or equivalent

Study of cellular organization and function. Fundamental biochemical properties, including cellular components, enzyme function, energetics, and metabolism studied in relation to cellular structure, membrane function, cell movement, and cytoplasmic compartments. (Fall & Spring)

356 Cell Biology Laboratory (1:0:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 355

Laboratory exercises to complement lecture material of 355. (Fall & Spring)

361 Biology and Conservation of Sea Turtles (3:1:6)

Pr. BIO 112 or permission of instructor

Travel fees involved, see instructor for details.

Students spend 2 weeks in July/August in Tortuguero, Costa Rica assisting with tagging and collecting data on nesting turtles. Seminar and NC field trip in spring. (Odd)

364 Experimental Course: Patterns in Life's Diversity (2:2)

Pr. BIO 112

Historical and contemporary patterns of life's diversity on earth and how these patterns have been generated, through time and space, by biotic and abiotic processes. (Offered spring '06)

370 Vertebrate Zoology (3:2:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Classification, identification, and phylogeny of all classes of vertebrates, with field work. (Fall)

392 Genetics (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112

Mendelism and modern trends in genetics. (Fall & Spring)

393 Genetics Laboratory (1:0:4)

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 392

Laboratory course to complement BIO 392. Exercises employ both classic genetic approaches and modern recombinant DNA technology. (Fall & Spring)

420 Marine Biology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112, and one of 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392

An introduction to marine organisms and their habitats; special attention given to adaptations necessary for marine life, physical oceanography, and basic ecological principles; one weekend coastal field trip is required. (Even Spring)

424 Plant Physiology and Biotechnology (3:2:3)

Pr. BIO 355

Physiological processes involved in plant growth spanning effects from the molecular to the environmental level. Laboratories will utilize biotechnological manipulations of the model plant Arabidopsis. (Spring)

425 Biological Clocks (3:3)

Pr. one of 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392

Descriptive survey of behavioral and physiological rhythms in humans and other animals, including circadian, tidal, lunar, seasonal and circannual cycles, with ecological considerations and implications for human health.

430 Biological Evolution (3:3)

Pr. BIO 301 and 392, and one of 322, 341, 354, 370

Survey of modern systematics and the biological mechanisms responsible for diversity among living forms. (Spring)

431 The Biosphere (3:3)

Pr. BIO 301

A study of environmental issues in biology, specifically ecosystems, population dynamics, biodiversity and extinction.

438 Animal Behavior (3:3)

Pr. PSY 121 and 230, or BIO 112

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 439 or PSY 438 or 438L.

Application of theory of evolution to the explanation of animal behavior. Surveys a variety of species, addressing several behavioral categories as well as issues in sociobiology and human evolution. (Same as PSY 438)

439 Animal Behavior with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. PSY 230 and 311, or BIO 112

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 438 or PSY 438 or 438L.

Application of theory of evolution to animal behavior. Includes laboratory and field techniques for assessing behavioral adaptations. Surveys several behavioral categories in a variety of species. (Alt Spring) (Same as PSY 438L)

453 Vertebrate Morphogenesis (4:3:3)

Pr. BIO 355

Vertebrate development focussed on cellular and molecular mechanisms of induction, differentiation, and morphogenetic processes that give rise to the adult body plan. Laboratory includes study of vertebrate embryos and adult specimens. (Fall)

464 Developmental Biology (4:3:3)

Pr. C (2.0) or better in BIO 355 and 392

A survey of developmental processes in plants and animals. Topics will include fertilization, achievement of multicellularity, cell determination and differentiation, pattern development, and the genetic regulation of such processes. (Spring)

472 Histology (4:3:4)

Pr. BIO 355

Microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues. Emphasis on correlation of cell and tissue functions with structures visible under the light and electron microscopes. (Odd Spring)

477 Animal Physiology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 355, and one of BIO 277, 341, or 370

Physiology of invertebrates and vertebrates including metabolism, temperature regulation, respiration, blood, circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, and the nervous, sensory, endocrine, and muscular systems. (Even Fall)

479 Neurobiology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 355

PHY 212 or 292 recommended.

Survey of major integrative mechanisms used by nervous systems from invertebrates to humans. Synaptic transmission, sensory processing and activity of neural circuitry controlling behavior will be analyzed. (Odd Fall)

479L Neurobiology Laboratory (1:0:2)

Pr. or Coreq. BIO 479

PHY 212 recommended

Computer-based laboratory exercises to complement BIO 479 lecture material, including intracellular and extracellular recording simulations. (Alt Fall)

481 General Microbiology (4:3:4)

Pr. BIO 301, 355, 392, or permission of instructor

Introductory survey of microbiology, emphasizing the role of microorganisms in everyday life. (Fall)

490 Medical Technology Clinical Year (30)

Enrollment restricted to majors in the Medical Technology program who have been accepted to a clinical program and are completing requirements for the B.S.M.T.

Registration and credit are structured as follows: BIO 490A (fall semester—12 s.h.), BIO 490B (spring semester—12 s.h.) and BIO 490C (summer session—7 s.h.).

491 Experimental Course: Introduction to Mathematical Models in Biology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112; MAT 191 or STA 271; or instructor's permission

Exploration of research and methodology at the interface of mathematics and biology, with an overview of relevant fields and in-depth case studies. Focus will be on mathematical models in biology. (Offered spring '08) (Same as MAT 491)

493 Honors Work (3–6)

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major

May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes*

*Only 3 hours credit allowed in combination with BIO 497 or 499

 

494 Introduction to Biotechnology (4:3:4)

Pr. BIO 392 and 393

Introduction to the principles and techniques of biotechnology. Includes molecular cloning, DNA sequencing, and gene expression. Explores topics such as gene amplification, gene therapy, and DNA fingerprinting. (Spring)

497 Internship in Biology (1–3:0:3–9)

Pr. minimum overall GPA of 2.80; two of BIO 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392 with a grade of C or better; and permission of instructor

May be repeated for up to 6* s.h. credit with departmental
permission.

*Only 3 s.h. credit allowed in combination with BIO 493 or 499

Students work at site outside University for a minimum of 45–135 hours under direction of faculty and on-site supervisor. Times vary. Prior approval required.

498 Biology Seminar (1:1)

Oral reports and discussions of topics from current literature of biology by students, faculty and guest lecturers.

499 Undergraduate Research (1–3)

Pr. two from BIO 301, 322, 341, 354, 355, 370, 392 and permission of instructor

May be repeated for up to 6* s.h. credit with departmental permission.

*Only 3 s.h. credit allowed in combination with BIO 493 or 497

Biological research under the direction of a faculty member, culminating in a written report. Research will include laboratory and/or field work and/or directed readings of the literature. Times by arrangement.

See Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate Students.