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Classical Civilization Courses (CCI)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Courses in English Translation;
no knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

Courses for Undergraduates

102 The Classical Art of Persuasion (3:3)

GE Core: GRD

GE Marker: GL

Introduction to Greek and Roman rhetoric. Study of selected speeches in their ancient contexts (law courts, funerals, politics) and early views on the art and power of persuasion.

111 Introduction to Linguistics (3:3)

Introductory study of the science of language: principles of sound, meaning, structure, use, and the interactions of language and society. (Fall) (Same as ENG 111 and LIN 111)

201 Introduction to Greek Civilization (3:3)

GE Core: GHP

GE Marker: GL

CAR: GPM

Introduction to Greek civilization from its beginnings to the Hellenistic age. Lectures and discussion will focus on the development of Greek literature, thought, and art in the context of society.

202 Introduction to Roman Civilization (3:3)

GE Core: GHP

GE Marker: GL

CAR: GPM

Introduction to Roman civilization from its beginnings to the Roman Empire. Lectures and discussion will focus on the development of Roman literature, thought, and art in the context of society.

205 Mythology (3:3)

GE Core: GPR

GE Marker: GL

Great myths of the world with emphasis on Greek and Roman mythology. Discussion of literary and artistic representations, religious, philosophical and ethical traditions, and different theories of myth.

206 Classical Origins of the English Language (3:3)

GE Marker: GL

Analysis of Greek and Latin prefixes, stems, and suffixes used in English. Emphasis on the history of beliefs, institutions, and traditions reflected in the Greek and Latin elements.

207 Ancient Sports and Society (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

GE Marker: GL

Survey of the ancient Olympics and local games of Greece and the gladiatorial sports of the Roman world, with special attention to sociopolitical, economic, and religious impact of sporting behaviors. (Spring)

211 Introduction to Greek Archaeology (3:3)

GE Core: GHP

GE Marker: GL

CAR: GPM

Archaeological consideration of the Mycenaean, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods of Greek civilization.

212 Introduction to Roman Archaeology (3:3)

GE Core: GHP

GE Marker: GL

CAR: GPM

Introduction to the archaeology of the Roman world, with particular emphasis on Rome and the monumental remains of its vast empire.

227 Comparative Studies in World Epics (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Major world epics in translation including the following works in whole or in part: Gilgamesh, Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Chanson de Roland, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, Joyce’s Ulysses.

228 Comparative Studies in World Drama (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Greek, Latin, and modern plays in translation: representative plays from Aeschylus through Euripides, Seneca, Terence, Racine, O’Neill, Cocteau, Anouilh, et al.

240 Ancient Warfare (3:3)

GE Core: GHP

CAR: GPM

Survey of ancient warfare covering major battles, generals, strategy, tactics, weapons, and technology from the ancient Near East through the Roman Empire. (Alt Fall)

305 Classical Tragedy (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Study of Greek tragedians of Athens in the fifth century and their subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca.

306 Classical Comedy (3:3)

GE Core: GFA

GE Marker: GL

Study of Greek comedy in the fifth and fourth centuries and its subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus.

312 The Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3:3)

GE Core: GFA

GE Marker: GN

Pr. CCI 211 or CCI 212 or ATY 258

Introduction to the archaeology of Egypt, emphasizing the relations between Egypt and the Aegean in the Bronze Age.

313 Archaeology of the Aegean (3:3)

Introduction to the Minoans and Mycenaeans. The archaeology of the Aegean Islands, Crete, the coast of Asia Minor, including Troy, and the mainland of Greece in the Bronze Age.

314 Ancient Cities (3:3)

Introduction to the great cities of the past, emphasizing the physical design of those cities, especially as it reflects changing political and social structures.

321 The Archaic Age (3:3)

GE Core: GPR

GE Marker: GL

Study of the Greek Archaic period, from the end of the Homeric Age to the dawn of the Classical era. Focus on literature, art, and religion within their social context.

323 The World of Alexander the Great (3:3)

Pr. CCI 201 or CCI 211 or permission of instructor

An introduction to the Hellenistic period of Greek civilization, emphasizing its art and architecture, its religion and literature in their historical context.

324 The Age of Cicero (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Introduction to Roman literature and society in the first century b.c. Focus on the development of the genres of Latin literature and the relationship between politics and literature.

325 The Age of Augustus (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Introduction to Roman literature and society during the reign of Augustus. Focus on the development of Latin epic poetry, historical writing, and elegy, and the relationship between authors and Emperor.

326 The Age of Nero (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Introduction to Roman literature and society during the reign of Nero and his successors. Focus on readings that reflect changes in the Roman Empire of the first and second centuries.

330 Women in Antiquity (3:3)

GE Marker: GL

Pr. CCI 201, 202, or 205

Public and private lives of Greek and Roman women of the Classical Period, focusing on women’s political, religious, and domestic roles, their general social status, health and welfare.

336 Language Change (3:3)

Pr. LIN 111, ENG 111, or ATY 387, or permission of instructor

What makes languages change and how does language change affect individuals and societies? Survey of the empirical study of language change, with insights drawn from linguistics, sociolinguistics, and anthropology. (Same as LIN 336)

340 Ancient Cosmology (3:3)

GE Core: GPR

GE Marker: GL

Survey of ancient theories of the origins and configuration of the universe. Focus on Greek and Roman philosophical accounts, with some attention to Old Testament and Babylonian creation narratives.

350 Roman Law and Society (3:3)

GE Core: GPR

GE Marker: GL

Pr. CCI 202 or CCI 324 or permission of instructor

Exploration of major concepts and principles of Roman law and the society in which they developed, primarily through the study of cases from the writings by Roman jurists.

351 History of Greece, 2000 b.c.– 31 b.c. (3:3)

Mycenaean society, Greek “dark ages,” colonization and tyranny, Athens and Sparta, flowering in the fifth and fourth centuries, conquests of Alexander, Hellenistic empires, and the diffusion of Greek civilization. (Same as HIS 351)

353 Athens in the Fifth Century b.c. (3:3)

Pr. CCI 220 or 351 or permission of instructor

Study of the social and political history of Athens in the fifth century b.c. (Same as HIS 353)

354 The Roman Republic, 754 b.c.–44 b.c. (3:3)

Study of the social and political forces that led to Rome’s conquest of the Mediterranean World and of the transformation which world conquest wrought on Rome itself. Topics covered include: the Roman Constitution and politics, the Roman conquest of Italy and then of the whole Mediterranean, and the decline of the Republic. (Same as HIS 354)

355 The Roman Empire, 44 b.c.a.d. 337 (3:3)

GE Marker: GL

Survey of politics and society at Rome under the Empire, when Rome dominated Western Civilization. Topics covered include: Augustus and the rise of one-man rule at Rome, the long “Roman Peace” and the civilizing of Europe under the Emperors, the rise of Christianity, and the transformed Empire of Constantine the Great. (Same as HIS 355)

360 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Britain and Gaul (3:3)

Pr. CCI 212 or permission of instructor

Archaeological study of provinces of Gaul and Britain. Following in the footsteps of Julius Caesar to look at how incorporation into the empire changed the lives of the Celtic "barbarians." (Occ)

365 Archaeology of the Roman Provinces: Asia Minor and Syria (3:3)

Pr. CCI 212 or permission of instructor

Archaeological study of Asia Minor and Syria, a region at the crossroads between East and West. Focus on the impact of the Roman Empire on Eastern culture and society. (Occ)

370 Classical Rhetoric and Culture (3:3)

Pr. CCI 102 or 201 or 202 or permission of instructor

Exploration and analysis of the role and importance of rhetoric and oratory in the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Authors studied include Homer, Plato, Cicero, and Augustine. (Occ)

389 Experimental Course: Women in Classical Drama (3:3)

Examination of several Greek and Roman plays (tragedies and comedies) and performance techniques to understand women's presentation on the public stage as models and countermodels of conventional social mores. (Offered spring '05)

393, 394 Classical Studies Abroad (3:3), (3:3)

Pr. permission of department

Extensive reading in Greek and Latin literature in translation, ancient history and archaeology, selected in accordance with student needs. For students participating in foreign study programs.

401 Archaeological Practicum (1–3)

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 s.h.

Participation in pre-approved archaeological work and opportunity to learn the field methods of classical archaeology firsthand.

405 Advanced Studies in Mythology (3:3)

Pr. CCI 205 or permission of the instructor

Study of selected myths from Greece, Rome, and comparative cultures. Focus on original literature, supplemented by ancient and modern critical works. Topics will vary; see description for each term.

407 Roman Myth and Legend (3:3)

GE Marker: GL

Pr. CCI 205

Examination of the myths and legends of ancient Rome and their connection to the history of Roman political and religious life. (Occ)

450 Internship in Classical Studies (1–6)

Pr. permission of department head

May be repeated once, for a maximum of 6 s.h. credit

Supervised field experience in museums or institutes devoted to the study of Ancient Greece or Rome and/or visitation of classical sites.

475 Archaeology of Death in the Classical World (3:3)

Pr. CCI 211 or 212 or ATY 258 or 360

Survey of archaeological evidence for funerary customs and beliefs in the Bronze Age Aegean, Classical Greece, and Rome, with a study of comparative evidence from other ancient and modern cultures. (Alt)

490 Seminar in Classical Studies (3:3)

Pr. permission of instructor

May be repeated once for credit when topic changes

Seminar on the history and methodologies of scholarship in Classical Studies. Topics will vary. (Alt)

493 Honors Work (3–6)

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major

May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate Students

501 Independent Study (1–3)

Pr. permission of instructor

May be repeated for credit for up to 6 s.h.

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruction in Classical Studies.

502 History of Latin Literature (3:3)

Pr. permission of instructor

A survey of Latin literature in English translation from the third century b.c. to the beginnings of the Middle Ages.

512 The Archaeology of Roman Daily Life (3:3)

Study of Roman daily life and the evidence from archaeology and ancient literature for daily life.

541 Ancient World: Selected Topics (3:3)

May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

Varying topics in ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman history, including politics and public rituals, patterns of social organization, ancient slavery, and cross-cultural interactions. (Same as HIS 541)

550 Selected Topics in Classical Studies (3:3)

May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

Varying topics in Greek and/or Roman literature, archaeology, or culture, chosen according to the needs of the students. All readings in English translation. (Fall or Spring or Summer)

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin
for additional graduate-level courses.