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English Courses (ENG)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Courses for Undergraduates

100 Basic Writing (3:3)

Does not fulfill the University writing requirement.

Credit does not apply toward graduation nor count in the student’s GPA.

Instruction and practice in basic writing skills, in preparation for 101. Admission to the course is by advice of the Director of Composition on the basis of SAT scores and placement testing.

101 English Composition I (3:3)

GE Core: GRD

Equivalent credit to FMS 115/RCO 101. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 101 and either FMS 115 or RCO 101.

Students read and write in varied forms, styles, and lengths. Goals include developing ideas and revising writing, experimenting with aims and approaches in producing writing, and understanding appeals to various audiences. (Fall & Spring)

102 English Composition II (3:3)

GE Core: GRD

Pr. ENG 101, or FMS 115 or RCO 101

Equivalent credit to FMS 116/RCO 102; students may not receive credit for ENG 102 and either FMS 116 or RCO 102.

Emphasizes developing ideas and supporting varied writing tasks. Goals include effective uses of evidence, control in style and voice, understanding varied forms and perspectives. (Fall & Spring)

103 Essentials of Professional and Business Writing (3:3)

Pr. ENG 101

Focus: written skills needed for workplace success. Emphasizes process strategies for clear, concise, and accurate messages. Develops skills in producing professional documents, analyzing the writing of others, and collaborating on written assignments. (Fall & Spring)

104 Approach to Literature (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Critical reading and analysis of fiction, poetry and drama with an emphasis on a variety of major themes and their relevance to contemporary life. (Fall & Spring)

105 Introduction to Narrative (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Critical reading and analysis of American and British novels, short stories, and narrative poems. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds as appropriate. (Fall & Spring)

106 Introduction to Poetry (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Critical reading and analysis of British and American lyric, dramatic, and narrative poetry. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds as appropriate. (Fall & Spring)

107 Introduction to Drama (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Critical reading and analysis of British and American drama. Attention to historical, cultural, and literary backgrounds, especially the Continental dramatic background, as appropriate. (Fall & Spring)

108 Topics in British and American Literature (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Variable topics. Offerings may include Southern Writers, The Mystery Novel, Women Writers, The Imperial Imagination, and Grail Literature. (Alt Years)

109 Introduction to Shakespeare (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Intensive study of a limited number of plays (and perhaps some sonnets) using such approaches as textual analysis, historical material, filmed versions, attendance at productions, discussion, writing, and performance study. (Fall & Spring)

110 World Literature in English (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Introductory survey of literature written in English by authors from regions outside the United States and the British Isles—the West Indies, India, Canada, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. (Alt Years)

111 Introduction to Linguistics (3:3)

Introductory study of the science of language: principles of sound, meaning, structure, use, and the interactions of language and society. (Fall) (Same as CCI 111 and LIN 111)

201 European Literary Classics: Ancient to Renaissance (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Critical reading and analysis of works in translation: Homer, Dante, Cervantes, and others. (Fall & Spring)

202 European Literary Classics: Enlightenment to Modern (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Critical reading and analysis of works in translation: Molière, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Kafka, and others. (Fall & Spring)

203 Academic English for Speakers of Other Languages (3:3)

Restricted to students whose first language is not English.

Does not satisfy the University composition requirement.

Emphasis on the active use of language skills: speaking, listening, reading, writing. (Fall & Spring)

204 Non-Western Literary Classics (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GN

Reading and analysis of the most influential literary texts of Non-Western cultures, ancient through modern; readings include translations of prose and poetry from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.

208 Topics in Global Literature (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. Offerings may include Europe at War, World Women Writers, Literature and Revolution, and Holocaust Literature. (Alt Years)

209 Topics in Non-Western Literature (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GN

Variable topics, with emphasis on regional interconnections. Offerings may include South Asian Diaspora, Postcolonial Childhood, Afro-Caribbean Writers, and Australasian Writers. (Alt Years)

210 Literature and the Arts (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Exploration of the relationships between literary and extraliterary arts such as music, visual arts, cinema, and architecture. Extraliterary focus will vary. (Alt Years)

211 Major British Authors: Medieval to Neoclassical (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of instructor

Major poets, dramatists, satirists read within the context of their times: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, and others. (Fall & Spring)

212 Major British Authors: Romantic to Modern (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of instructor

Major authors of the Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods studied in relation to their times and traditions: Wordsworth, Tennyson, Yeats, Joyce, and others. (Fall & Spring)

219 Journalism I: Fundamentals of Newswriting (3:3)

Introduction to newspaper journalism. Emphasis on basic newswriting and reporting. Combines writing workshop and lecture. (Fall & Spring)

221 Writing of Poetry: Introductory (3:3)

Pr. satisfaction of GLT requirement

Introductory workshop in writing poetry for students beyond the freshman year.

223 Writing of Essays (3:3)

Pr. ENG 101 or exemption

Course in reading and writing the essay, with particular attention to style and voice. (Fall & Spring)

225 Writing of Fiction: Introductory (3:3)

Pr. satisfaction of GLT requirement

Introductory workshop in writing fiction for students beyond the freshman year.

235 Science Fiction (3:3)

Historical and critical study of science fiction in the twentieth century.

236 Genre Fiction (3:3)

Selected writers from a popular kind (genre) of fiction, such as horror, spy, crime, fantasy, sports. Topic to vary.

251 Major American Authors: Colonial to Romantic (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Pr. sophomore standing, or English major, or permission of instructor

Classic authors and their contributions to the intellectual life of America: Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Poe, Whitman, Dickinson, and others. (Fall & Spring)

252 Major American Authors: Realist to Modern (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Pr. sophomore standing, English major, or permission of instructor

Late nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors and their contributions to the development of modern thought: Dickinson, Twain, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and others. (Fall & Spring)

260 Introduction to the English Language (3:3)

Relationship between the English language as a system and individual uses of language. Techniques for describing language, theories about language, and introduction to the structure and history of English. (Fall)

261 Dialects of American English (3:3)

Consideration of the historical, geographical, and social factors which have influenced the varieties of modern American English, the methodology of dialect study, and the representation of dialects in American literature.

262 Sociolinguistics (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

Introduction to language in its sociocultural context. Topics include geographical and social dialects, language and identity, domains of language use, language attitudes, and the nature of multilingual societies. (Alt) (Same as LIN 262)

302 Second Language Acquisition (3:3)

Survey of language acquisition theories, including first and second language development issues; theoretical and pedagogical approaches to working with linguistically and culturally diverse learners. (Alt) (Same as LIN 302)

303 Critical Approaches to the Study of Literature (3:3)

Introduction to critical approaches to literature. Guidelines for and practice in writing about literature. (Fall & Spring)

311, 312 Literary Studies Abroad (3:3), (3:3)

Selected literary topics—themes, authors, genres, periods—with emphasis on their relationships to physical and cultural settings associated with the literature. Residence abroad. (Summer)

315 Postcolonial Literatures (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Pr. sophomore standing or higher

Literature from South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, and Canada marked by the experience of European colonialism. Topics include non-European literary forms, colonization, political resistance, nationalism, gender, postcolonial predicaments.

316 Studies in Human Rights and Literature (3:3)

May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Exploration of how literature treats human rights violations and how human rights norms shape stories. Topics will vary and may include such subjects as genocide, hunger, child soldiers, censorship, torture.

318 Journalism IV: Advanced Reporting and Writing (3:3)

Pr. ENG 219

This course focuses on developing advanced skills in print and online journalism. Students will pursue projects in investigative and feature writing, as well as computer-assisted reporting. (Fall or Spring)

319 Journalism II: Editing the Newspaper (3:3)

Pr. ENG 219 or permission of instructor

Values and practices in newspaper editing. Emphasis on ethics, editing skills, newspaper design, and writing editorials. (Spring)

320 Journalism III: Feature Writing and Reviewing (3:3)

Pr. ENG 219 or permission of instructor

Writing workshop: values and journalistic practices in writing feature articles and reviews; includes book reviewing and critical writing on other arts.

321 Linguistics for Teachers (3:3)

Introduction to formal study of the English language, including intensive review of structural and transformational grammars. Other topics of interest to teachers of English, including geographical and social dialects and teaching composition. Course satisfies a State requirement for prospective English teachers. (Fall & Spring)

322 The Teaching of Writing (3:3)

Pr. University Reasoning and Discourse requirements must already have been met. For students seeking licensure in English, it is recommended that 321 be taken first.

Principles of written discourse with a survey of techniques of teaching composition. Instruction in composing, editing, and criticizing written discourse. (Fall & Spring)

323 Literary Nonfiction (3:3)

Pr. completion of Reasoning and Discourse requirement

Workshop in writing essays and other types of nonfiction with emphasis on audience and style.

325 Writing of Fiction: Intermediate (3:3)

Pr. ENG 225 or permission of instructor

Continuation of introductory workshop in writing fiction for students beyond the freshman year.

326 Writing of Poetry: Intermediate (3:3)

Pr. ENG 221 or permission of instructor

Continuation of introductory workshop in writing poetry for students beyond the freshman year.

327 Writing in the Professions (3:3)

Pr. University Reasoning and Discourse requirement must already have been met.

Principles of clarity, precision, audience analysis, document design, collaboration, and usability applied to a variety of professional writing tasks. May include elements of visual design, Web site design, or grant writing. (Fall & Spring)

329 Literature and Film (3:3)

Selected short stories, novels, plays, film scripts and their film versions, with emphasis on rendering literary values into film.

331 Women in Literature (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

Study of women as readers, writers, and characters in literature. Attention to questions of literary canon and to women’s position in drama, the novel, and poetry. (Fall & Spring)

332 English Women Writers before 1800 (3:3)

Pr. ENG 211

Study of the literary and social significance of texts written in various genres by English women prior to 1800.

333 Southern Writers (3:3)

Fiction, poetry, drama of the modern and contemporary South. Emphasis on Southern perspectives, values, traditions. Faulkner, Welty, Wright, Tate, O’Connor, Percy, and others.

336 Introduction to Chaucer (3:3)

Pr. for advanced undergraduates

Chaucer’s major poetry examined within the context of medieval cultural traditions. Readings in the early dream visions, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected Canterbury Tales. Attention given to language and pronunciation.

337 English Literature to 1500 (3:3)

Culture of the Middle Ages. Selected reading in English literature from Beowulf to Malory. Works in Anglo-Saxon and some in Middle English in translation.

338 The Sixteenth Century 1500–1610 (3:3)

Earlier English Renaissance lyric, romance, prose, and drama; study of humanist backgrounds and contexts; emphasis on development of thought and style.

339 Shakespeare: Early Plays and Sonnets (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

A selection of representative plays including Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 1 Henry IV, Much Ado about Nothing, Henry V, and Hamlet. (Fall & Spring)

340 Shakespeare: Later Plays (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

A selection of representative plays, including Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. (Fall & Spring)

341 Themes in Literature (3:3)

May be repeated for credit when theme varies.

Study of a major theme in literature of general interest. Through a variety of sources, mainly literature, but including art, film, history, and music, the class will explore the dimensions and complexities of the theme.

342 The Seventeenth Century (3:3)

Main lines of thought and style noted in major writers of the later Renaissance from Donne and Jonson through Milton. Emphasis on lyric and metaphysical poetry.

344 Romantic Poetry and Poetics (3:3)

Intensive study of works by Wordsworth, Coleridge, the Shelleys, Keats, and Byron, with attention to development of Romantic movement.

345 Victorian Literature (3:3)

Major Victorian writings: poems by the Brownings, Tennyson, the Rossettis, and others; prose works by Carlyle, Arnold, Mill, and others.

346 English Literature from Victorian to Modern (3:3)

Critical study of English literature from the end of Victorian period to beginning of the modern era. Features such writers as Pater, Wilde, Yeats, Shaw, Hardy, Conrad, Ford, and Wells.

348 Contemporary British Literature and Culture (3:3)

Post-1945 British literature in cultural, political/historical context. Topics include history, social class, sexuality, gender, race, immigration, post-imperial nostalgia, realism, the legacy of modernism, postmodernism, and cultural studies.

349 English Novel from Defoe to Hardy (3:3)

Introduction to the great tradition of the English novel. Selected novels by Fielding, Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, and others.

350 The Twentieth-Century English Novel (3:3)

Development of the English novel from Conrad through end of World War II, featuring such writers as Forster, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, and Greene.

351 The American Novel through World War I (3:3)

Historical and critical study of Hawthorne, Stowe, Twain, Alcott, Chesnutt, James, Johnson, and others.

352 The Twentieth-Century American Novel (3:3)

Historical and critical study of Wharton, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Wright, Welty, and others. (Fall & Spring)

353 The Contemporary Novel (3:3)

Historical and critical study of Updike, McCarthy, Gaddis, Morrison, Tan, Pynchon, and others.

358 Modern Poetry (3:3)

Poets and schools of poetry, British and American, from 1915 to 1945, with emphasis on the great variety of styles and subjects.

359 Contemporary Poetry (3:3)

British and American poetry 1945 to present. Emphasis on themes and styles, with particular attention given to classical sources, world history, and modern innovations in technique. (Spring)

360 The Eighteenth Century (3:3)

Major writers of the Restoration and eighteenth century in a historical, literary, and cultural context: Dryden, Behn, Pope, Swift, Johnson, and others.

371 Literary Study of the Bible (3:3)

GE Core: GLT

GE Marker: GL

The Bible as part of the world’s great literature. Designed to give students a better comprehension of the Bible through study of its origins, history, structure, and literary qualities.

372 Early American Literature (3:3)

Literature in the New World to 1820. Topics include exploration and contact, Puritanism, the Great Awakening, the Revolution, and the rise of captivity and travel narratives and the novel. (Alt)

373 American Romanticism (3:3)

Survey of selected major romantic writers, c. 1800–1900: Irving, Bryant, Cooper, Prescott, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and authors from the Brahmin and Transcendentalist groups. Authors and topics will vary. (Alt)

374 Early African American Writers (3:3)

Critical survey of the traditions, ideas, techniques, and directions of African American writing from its beginnings to the early Harlem Renaissance.

375 Topics in Native American Writing (3:3)

May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Exploration of the writings and cultural production, in any period, of Indigenous peoples on lands claimed by the United States.

376 African American Writers after the 1920s (3:3)

Critical survey of the traditions, thought, and directions of African American writing from the late Harlem Renaissance to the present.

377 American Realism and Naturalism (3:3)

Survey of major realistic and naturalistic writers, c. 1860–1920: Stowe, Twain, Howells, James, Chopin, Dreiser, Chesnutt, Wharton, Glasgow, and others. Authors and topics will vary. (Alt)

378 American Life-Writing (3:3)

Survey of various forms of American life-writing, such as autobiographies, diaries, letters, journals, tribal history, narrative poetry, and travel writing; and affiliated critical work.

379 American Women’s Writing (3:3)

Survey of a particular area, period, theme, or genre of American women’s writing and affiliated critical work.

380 Literature and the Environment (3:3)

Exploration of some important post-1800 literary texts about "nature," of ecocritical theories, and of affiliated social movements, with particular attention to place-based differences. (Spring)

381 English Drama to 1800 (3:3)

Critical, cultural, and historical study of the English drama— excluding Shakespeare—from medieval plays to eighteenth-century comedy: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Dryden, Congreve, Sheridan, and others.

382 Modern British and American Drama (3:3)

Historical and critical survey of British and American drama 1890 to the present: Shaw, O’Neill, Yeats, Synge, Pinter, Miller, Williams, and others.

383 Topics in Queer Studies (3:3)

May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Exploration of the writings and cultural production, in any period, through the lens of queer studies. (Alt)

390 Studies in Writing Center Theory and Practice (3:2:3)

Principles of writing center theory, including writing center history, philosophy, and pedagogy; training of writing center consultants and experience in teaching writing in individualized or small-group tutorial sessions. (Fall & Spring)

401 Internship in Journalism and Editing (3:0:8)

Pr. English major; junior standing or higher; 3.0 cumulative GPA; recommendation of UNCG journalism instructor and permission of the Internship Coordinator

Field experience for senior English majors with a newspaper or magazine publisher. Academic supervision provided by Internship Coordinator and direction in field provided by job supervisor. (Fall & Spring & Summer)

402 Internship in English Studies (3:0:8)

Pr. English major; junior standing or higher; 3.0 cumulative GPA; recommendation of UNCG English faculty member and permission of the Internship Coordinator

Field experience for advanced English majors in jobs related to English studies. Academic supervision provided by Internship Coordinator and direction in field provided by job supervisor. (Fall & Spring & Summer)

425 Writing of Fiction: Advanced (3:3)

Pr. ENG 325 or permission of instructor

Advanced workshop in writing fiction. Discussion of student fiction supplemented by readings of fiction and essays about fiction by historical and contemporary masters of the genre.

426 Writing of Poetry: Advanced (3:3)

Pr. ENG 326 or permission of instructor

Advanced workshop in writing poetry. Discussion of student poetry supplemented by readings of poetry and essays about poetry by historical and contemporary masters of the genre.

450 Pre-1800 Literature Senior Seminar (3:3)

Pr. senior standing and English major, or permission of instructor

Variable topic seminar course intended for senior English majors.

451 Post-1800 Literature Senior Seminar (3:3)

Pr. senior standing and English major, or permission of instructor

Variable topic seminar course intended for senior English majors.

493 Honors Work (3–6)

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major

May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

494 Honors Seminar (3:3)

Pr. English major with upperclass standing, and either enrollment in the Honors Programs or a minimum 3.30 overall GPA

Study of an important topic in Literature, Criticism, Theory, or Rhetoric. (Fall)

499 Experimental Course: Advanced Composition, Rhetorical Power (3:3)

Pr. ENG 101 or equivalent

Designed to engage writers in developing writing skill and interpretive understanding by studying the uses and abuses of rhetoric in the world of texts and images that surround us. (Offered fall '08)