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Exercise and Sport Science Courses (ESS)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Any University student may take up to eight (8) hours of elective credit in physical education activity courses to apply toward graduation.

Courses for Undergraduates

101 Beginning Volleyball (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of volleyball with opportunity for team play.

102 Team Handball (1:0:3)

Olympic sport activity which uses basketball playing skills in a soccer format.

103 Softball (1:0:3)

Introduction to basic techniques, knowledge, and strategies of slow pitch softball.

104 Beginning Basketball (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategical elements, and knowledge of basketball.

106 Beginning Soccer (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skill, strategies, and knowledge of soccer.

107 Field Hockey (1:0:3)

Course offers opportunity to develop the necessary skills and knowledge to participate in the team game of field hockey. Topics include skills, field layout, rules, tactics, goalkeeping, and officiating. (Fall)

119 Physical Activity for Individuals with Special Needs (1:0:3)

Pr. permission of a faculty supervisor and medical approval

May be repeated for credit.

Designed to provide one-to-one or small group instruction in physical activity for those students who, because of their disabling conditions, are unable to participate in scheduled physical education activity courses as usually structured.

120 Conditioning (1:0:3)

May be repeated for credit once.

Students may not take both ESS 299 and 120.

Principles of conditioning. Physical fitness assessment and development of a personal fitness program. Emphasis on maintenance or improvement of cardio-respiratory fitness.

122 Bicycling (1:0:3)

Introduction to basic cycling techniques, safety, bicycle maintenance, planning and participating in various trips. Must have own bike.

123 Beginning Snow Skiing (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $200.

Introduction to basic techniques, safety, and equipment of snow skiing. Fee: approximately $200, includes equipment rental, slope and lift fee, accident insurance, at French-Swiss Ski School, Blowing Rock, North Carolina.

124 Backpacking (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $20 for food and travel.

Introduction to backpacking including 20 hours of class sessions plus 1 overnight weekend trip to relatively secluded area.

125 Hiking/Camping (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $20 for food, travel, and campground fees.

Basic hiking/camping skills, compass, and topographical map use. Includes 20 hours of class sessions plus 1 overnight weekend camping trip.

126 Modern Rhythmical Gymnastics (1:0:3)

Manipulation of hand apparatus (balls, hoops, ropes) to musical accompaniment.

127 Beginning Golf (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $30.

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of golf. Opportunity to practice at both on and off campus facilities.

128 Beginning Bowling (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $30 for use of off-campus facility.

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of bowling with opportunity for match play.

130 Weight Training (1:0:3)

May be repeated once for credit.

Weight training with emphasis on principles, techniques, and development of individualized programs.

131 Jogging (1:0:3)

May be repeated once for credit.

Designed for the developing jogger, including information on basic skills and knowledge, graduated jogging programs, and self-testing procedures.

132 Ice Skating (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $40, includes skate rental and rink fee.

Fundamental skills of ice skating forward and backward with opportunity to learn spins, jumps, and free skating skills.

142 Social Dance (1:0:3)

Development of basic dance fundamentals, emphasizing the fox-trot, swing or jitterbug, cha-cha, waltz, tango, polka, rumba, samba, and current popular dances.

147 Square Dance (1:0:3)

Exploration of steps, patterns, formations, and cultural/historical background of American square dance.

150 Swimming for Non-Swimmers (1:0:3)

Designed for students with a fear of the water who cannot swim.

151 Beginning Swimming (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental swimming and safety skills; designed for students with little or no knowledge of strokes and limited deep water experience.

170 Beginning Fencing (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, tactics, and knowledge of foil fencing with opportunity for competitive bouting.

171 Beginning Badminton (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of badminton with opportunity for match play.

172 Beginning Self-Defense (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of non-weapon defense, including techniques from karate and judo.

173 Beginning Racquetball (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of racquetball with opportunity for match play.

174 Wrestling (1:0:3)

Combative sport offering participant a physically demanding experience and opportunity to develop wrestling skill and fitness.

175 Beginning Tennis (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements, and knowledge of tennis with opportunity for match play in singles and doubles.

201 Intermediate Volleyball (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies, and knowledge of volleyball. Emphasis on tactical elements of team play.

202 Water Aerobics (1:0:3)

Various methods of water exercise for conditioning are presented with focus on proper alignment and technique, principles of conditioning, and assessment. Emphasis on improvement and maintenance of personal fitness.

203 Fitness Swim (1:0:3)

Emphasis on stroke efficiency and lap swimming for conditioning. Principles of conditioning, assessment and periodization are applied to swimming. Emphasis on improvement and maintenance of personal fitness.

204 Intermediate Basketball (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies and knowledge of basketball. Emphasis on tactical elements of team play.

205 Rhythmic Aerobics (1:0:3)

May be repeated once for credit.

Conditioning course in which participants exercise to musical accompaniment for purpose of developing cardiovascular efficiency, strength, and flexibility.

206 Intermediate Soccer (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies and knowledge of soccer. Emphasis on tactical elements of team play.

207 Selected Physical Activities I—Core Program (2:1:2)

Pr. ESS majors only.

Survey of selected physical activities with special emphasis on personal performance experience and movement analysis. (Fall)

208 Selected Physical Activities II—Core Program (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS majors only.

Continued experience in selected physical activities, with special emphasis on personal performance. (Spring)

209 Advanced Rhythmic Aerobics (1:0:3)

Conditioning course designed for students who have foundational knowledge and experience in rhythmic aerobics. Beginning level experience extended through use of complex choreography patterns and advanced training methods. (Fall & Spring)

210 Rhythmic Aerobics Instructor (2:2:1)

Pr. ESS 209 or permission of instructor

Examination and application of principles from exercise science, music structure and group management for teaching rhythmic aerobics. Assists in preparation for ACSM Exercise Leader, AFAA and ACE Aerobics Instructor certifications. (Fall & Spring)

213 Sports Performance & Analysis I (1:3)

Skill development and analysis of soccer and basketball skills. Learning and application of physical education content in a developmental model. (Spring)

214 Sports Performance & Analysis II (1:3)

Skill development and analysis of tennis and volleyball skills. Learning and application of physical education content in a developmental model. (Fall)

217 Introduction to the Teaching of Physical Education (2:3)

Nature of teaching physical education; emphasis on its relationship to total educational experience. First-hand experience working with learners of diverse backgrounds and ability, grades K through 12, in varied settings. (Fall)

220 Physical Fitness for Life (3:3)

Lecture course with selected activity experiences regarding principles and methods for developing and maintaining fitness. Development and implementation of a personal physical fitness program designed for continuing participation throughout life.

223 Intermediate Snow Skiing (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $200, includes equipment rental, fees, and accident insurance for 5 days at French-Swiss Ski School, Blowing Rock, North Carolina.

Intermediate techniques of skiing including parallel turns, mogul skiing, wedging, and introduction to free-style skiing.

227 Intermediate Golf (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $30.

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies and knowledge of golf. Opportunity to practice at both on and off campus facilities.

228 Intermediate Bowling (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $30 for use of off campus facility.

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies and knowledge of bowling with opportunity for match play.

230 Psychological Skills for Optimal Performance (3:2:2)

Overview of sport psychology principles applied to sport and exercise activities. Includes experience in psychological skills training.

240 Introduction to World Folk Dance (1:0:3)

Basic experiences in folk dance designed to acquaint the beginning student with the steps, patterns, formations, national characteristics, and cultural settings of dances from all parts of the world.

242 Clogging (1:0:3)

Basic steps of clogging, historical and cultural concepts pertaining to clogging, and use of these steps in precision routines, freestyle clogging, and Appalachian Big Circle Mountain Dancing.

243 Intermediate Folk Dance (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS 240 or permission of instructor

Refinement of beginning folk dance skills and stylistic factors; advanced dance steps, patterns, and formations.

250 Introduction to Exercise and Sport Science (3:3)

Survey of the discipline of exercise and sport science. Analysis of the nature and importance of physical activity, knowledge base of the discipline, and careers in physical activity professions.

252 Low Intermediate Swimming (1:0:3)

Extension of basic swimming and safety skills; must be comfortable in deep water.

254 High Intermediate Swimming (1:0:3)

Refinement of swimming and safety skills; development of swimming endurance.

255 Water Safety Education (1:0:3)

Designed for students who do not wish to become lifeguards but who have responsibility for others in aquatic situations. Topics include personal and group water safety, and prevention and response to water accidents.

256 Advanced Swimming (1:0:3)

Continued refinement of swimming strokes and stroke variation; focus on distance swimming and competitive skills.

257 Synchronized Swimming (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills in synchronized swimming, and individual and group routines. Must be comfortable in deep water.

258 Lifeguard Training (3:2:2)

Pr. CPR/First Aid certification; successful performance on swimming entrance tests

Lab fee for supplies required.

Skills, knowledge and techniques for lifeguarding with possibility of certification in CPR for the Professional Rescuer, First Aid and Pool Lifeguarding. (Fall & Spring)

260 Water Polo (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, strategic elements and knowledge of water polo. Must be comfortable in deep water and have a minimum of intermediate swimming skills.

261 Springboard Diving (1:0:3)

Development of fundamental skills, understanding of mechanical principles, and overall knowledge for judging and coaching for 1 meter springboard diving.

262 Safety Training for Swim Coaches (1:0:3)

Development of knowledge about safety issues in competitive swimming, including aquatic facility hazards, training techniques, and medical conditions. Must have background in competitive swimming or coaching.

263 Basic SCUBA (1:0:3)

Additional fees for equipment rental and certification; must provide own mask, fins, snorkel and booties.

Development of fundamental skills, knowledge, and techniques of skin and SCUBA diving. Opportunity provided for open water training and final certification.

264 Advanced SCUBA (2:1:2)

Pr. ESS 263 or equivalent and permission of instructor

Additional fees for equipment rental, quarry use and certification; must provide own mask, fins, snorkel, and booties.

Extension of skills and knowledge beyond level of basic SCUBA diver, including familiarity with operation and maintenance of SCUBA equipment. Opportunities provided for speciality certifications.

268 Canoeing (1:0:3)

Additional fees for equipment and field trips.

Development of fundamental canoeing skills; day and overnight camping/canoeing trips possible. Must have ability to swim in deep water for 15 minutes without aid.

270 Intermediate Fencing (1:0:3)

Refinement of beginning skills, high- and low-line attacks and defenses; advanced footwork; and electrical foil fencing.

271 Intermediate Badminton (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies, and knowledge of badminton. Emphasis on tactical elements of match play.

272 Tae Kwon Do (1:0:3)

Acquisition and development of the basic techniques and knowledge of Tae Kwon Do. Presented in the culturally correct form.

273 Intermediate Racquetball (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies, and knowledge of racquetball. Emphasis on tactical elements of match play.

275 Intermediate Tennis (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of beginning level skills, strategies, and knowledge of tennis. Emphasis on tactical elements of match play in singles and doubles.

276 Advanced Tennis (1:0:3)

Extension and refinement of intermediate level skills, strategic elements and knowledge of tennis. Emphasis on optimizing performance through mental preparation and structured practice.

277 Advanced Golf (1:0:3)

Fee: approximately $20.00.

Advanced physical and mental skills will be learned, practiced, and implemented. Approximately one-third of the course will include playing at a local golf course.

280 Research and Evaluation in Exercise and Sport Science (3:3)

Pr. sophomore standing; STA 108 or 271

Overview of measurement, evaluation, and research methods in exercise and sport science; emphasis on applications to professional practice.

285 Motor Development (3:3)

Lifespan analysis of motor skill development as a function of chronological age.

290 Aesthetics of Sport (2:2:1)

Theoretical and laboratory experiences to analyze and synthesize sport theory and aesthetic theory in order to explore the nature of a sport aesthetic.

299 Physical Conditioning for Children (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS majors only.

Principles and components of health-related and performance-related conditioning. Emphasis on the design, implementation, and evaluation of conditioning programs for children.

301 Advanced Sport Technique (1:0:3)

Pr. permission of Activity Instructor Program Coordinator

May be taken once for each sport studied.

Advanced tutorial in individual sports. Meets concurrently with intermediate-level class. May not be taken in lieu of existing advanced course.

315 Children’s Educational Games (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS majors; open to elementary education majors with permission of instructor.

Performance and analysis of game skills and offensive/defensive strategies appropriate for children. (Fall)

316 Children’s Educational Gymnastics (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS majors; open to elementary education majors with permission of instructor.

Performance and analysis of gymnastic skills appropriate for children. (Fall)

330 Sociocultural Analyses of Sport and Exercise (3:3:1)

GE Core: GSB

Analyses of sports and exercise in sociocultural contexts, including professional, intercollegiate, youth sport, character, aggression, gender, race, class, and media. Field experience in local community agency required.

341 Teaching Elementary School Physical Education I (3:3)

Pr. junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor

Introduction to teaching physical education in grades K–6. Designed especially for the preservice classroom teacher. May include some field experiences.

342 Teaching Motor Skills to Preschool Children (3:2:3)

Pr. junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor

Strategies and techniques to enhance motor skill development of children ages 2–5 in the home, on the playground, and in the classroom. Field work with children emphasized.

350 History of American Sport (3:3)

Examination of the development and significance of sport in American society.

351 History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education (3:3)

Study of significant people, events, and institutions affecting the development of sport and exercise in North America. Analysis of major philosophic issues relating to sport and exercise.

352 Philosophy of Sport (3:3)

Overview of philosophical concerns related to study of sport and sport experiences, examined with use of current sport philosophy literature.

353 Injuries and Illnesses in Physical Activity (3:3)

Pr. BIO 271

Instruction in the prevention, recognition, and basic care of common injuries and illnesses that occur in a sport and exercise setting. (Fall & Spring)

354 Curriculum and Teaching: Children’s Physical Education (3:1:6)

Pr. ESS 315, 316, or permission of instructor

Admission to Teacher Education is required.

Planning and organizing for teaching and observation of movement in children’s physical education. Special emphasis will be on philosophy, curriculum development, and selection of appropriate content for elementary students. (Fall)

355 Instructional Strategies in Physical Activity Settings (3:3)

Pr. admission to Physical Education Teacher Education or Community Youth Sport Development Concentration, or permission of instructor

Planning and organizing for teaching and observation of movement in physical activity settings with special emphasis on lesson planning, management, assessment, task presentation, and content development. (Spring)

359 Water Safety Instructor (3:2:2)

Development of knowledge and skill to teach others in the American Red Cross programs of swimming and elementary rescue. Certification as a WSI is possible.

360 SCUBA Rescue (2:1:2)

Pr. or Coreq. ESS 264 or equivalent with permission of instructor

Additional fees for equipment rental, quarry use, and certifications.

Students must provide own mask, fins, snorkel, and booties.

Develop fundamental skills and knowledge needed to evaluate and take action in SCUBA rescue situations. Certification in CPR, First Aid, and administration of O2 possible.

365 SCUBA Divemaster (2:1:2)

Pr. permission of instructor

Additional fees for equipment rental, quarry use, and certifications.

Students must provide own mask, fins, snorkel, and booties.

Entry level course to become a diving professional. Development of comprehensive knowledge of diving theory as well as the abilities to organize, conduct, and supervise recreational diving activities.

375 Physiology of Sport and Physical Activity (4:3:3)

Pr. BIO 271 and 277, or permission of the instructor

Provides students with understanding of factors affecting the physiological function of the body related to exercise and physical performance. Laboratory provides experiences in evaluating these physiological factors. (Fall or Spring or Summer)

376 Biomechanics of Sport and Physical Activity (3:2:3)

Pr. BIO 271 or permission of instructor; one course in calculus or algebra recommended.

Anatomical and mechanical bases of physical activity with emphasis on the analysis of sport and exercise skills.

379 Exercise Instruction (3:3)

Pr. ESS 120, 130, and 220, or permission of instructor

ESS majors only.

Designing and implementing exercise instruction techniques for individuals and groups. (Fall & Spring)

381 Physical Education for Individuals with Special Needs (3:3)

Survey of all aspects of developmental, adapted, and corrective physical education for populations of children and adults with disabilities. Field experiences may be required.

385 Motor Learning and Control (3:3)

Pr. PSY 121

Analysis of mechanisms and environmental variables influencing the acquisition and control of skilled motor behavior at all ages. Introductory research techniques and experiences collecting data on human motor performance.

386 Motor Development and Learning (4:3:2)

Life span analysis of motor skill development and learning. (Fall & Spring)

388 Psychology of Sport and Exercise (4:4)

Pr. PSY 121

Examination of the psychological theories and research related to physical activity with emphasis on application in sport and exercise settings. (Fall & Spring)

389 Exercise Adherence (3:3)

Pr. ESS 388

An examination of the determinants, theories, and research related to exercise adherence; emphasis on application in health-related physical activity and exercise settings. (Fall)

390 Prevention and Emergency Care of Athletic Injuries (2:2)

Coreq. ESS 391

Supplies cost approximately $12.

Introduction to the field of athletic training emphasizing principles of prevention of athletic injuries and management of life-threatening and catastrophic injuries.

391 Athletic Training Clinical Education I (1:0:5)

Coreq. ESS 390 or permission of instructor

Lab fee for supplies required.

Laboratory sessions and supervised field experience. Introduction to athletic training with focus on development of skills in prevention of athletic injuries and management of catastrophic and life-threatening injuries. (Fall)

395 Experimental Course: Strength and Conditioning (3:3)

Pr. ESS 375, 376, and 379

How to design sport-specific strength and conditioning programs that will aid in injury prevention as well as performance enhancement. (Offered spring '08)

410 Process of Skill Acquisition (1:0:3)

Pr. ESS Majors only. ESS 288, 385, and 388; 375 and 376 are approved corequisites.

Focus on integration of theoretical knowledge across core courses with applied experience in skill acquisition.

425 Assistant Instructor of SCUBA (3:1:4)

Pr. permission of instructor

Additional fees for equipment rental, quarry use, and certifications.

Students must provide own mask, fins, snorkel, and booties.

Refine skills and theoretical knowledge to instructor level; develop instructional skills, understand administration and certification procedures.

441 Athletic Training Clinical Education II (3:0:12)

Pr. BIO 271, ESS 390, 391, acceptance in the ESSS Sports Medicine Program, or permission of instructor

Lab fee for supplies required.

Laboratory sessions and supervised field experience to develop clinical skills in selected athletic training tasks as required by the National Athletic Trainers Association. (Spring)

454 Curriculum and Teaching: Secondary School Physical Education (3:1:6)

Pr. ESS 213, 214, or permission of instructor

Admission to Teacher Education is required.

Planning and organizing for teaching and observation of movement in secondary school physical education. Emphasis on the analysis of the teaching process, curriculum development, and selection of appropriate content. (Spring)

455 Teaching Practicum I: Physical Fitness for Children and Adolescents (2:1:2)

Pr. ESS 355 and admission to Physical Education Teacher Education or Community Youth Sport Development concentration

Practicum experiences in children’s and adolescents’ physical activity settings with special emphasis on designing, planning, and integrating health-related physical fitness. (Fall)

456 Teaching Practicum II: Children’s Physical Activity (2:1:2)

Pr. ESS 355 and admission to Physical Education Teacher Education or Community Youth Sport Development concentration

Practicum experiences in teaching physical activity to children with special emphasis on lesson planning, management, assessment, task presentation, and content development. (Spring)

457 Teaching Practicum III: Adolescents’ Physical Activity (2:1:2)

Pr. ESS 355 and admission to Physical Education Teacher Education or Community Youth Sport Development concentration

Practicum experiences in teaching physical activity to adolescents with special emphasis on lesson planning, management, assessment, task presentation, and content development. (Fall)

458 Aquatic Facilities Management (3:3)

Develop fundamental knowledge and skills required to manage an aquatic facility, including risk management, operating procedures, maintenance, and record keeping. Certification as National Swimming Pool Foundation Certified Pool Operator possible.

459 Aquatics Instruction for Individuals with Special Needs (3:2:2)

Liability insurance required (available in class).

Develop knowledge and skills to teach aquatic skills to persons with special needs; activities include practice teaching, discussion of disabling conditions, and inclusion. Certification as a Teacher of Adapted Aquatics possible.

461, 462 Student Teaching and Seminar in Physical Education (6), (6)

Pr. program requirements leading to student teaching. Methods courses (ESS 354 and 454) must be taken at UNCG. Admission by application only.

Admission to Teacher Education is required.

ARC FA and CPR must be current.

Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP).

Block courses in professional semester for teacher education majors. Techniques of teaching physical education under supervision. Full-time teaching in schools. Weekly seminars. (Spring)

464 Administration of Physical Education and Athletics (3:3)

Pr. senior standing, and admission to Teacher Education or CYSD concentration, or permission of instructor

Administration of physical education and sport programs with special emphasis on long-range planning, organizing programs, public relations, financial management, legal issues, and risk management.

467 Techniques in Exercise and Fitness Testing (3:3)

Pr. grade of C or better in ESS 375; grades of C or better in all required ESS courses; GPA of 2.50 or better and admission to the fitness leadership concentration; or permission of instructor

Coreq. ESS 468

Laboratory and field techniques in exercise and fitness testing. (Fall & Spring)

468 Exercise and Fitness Testing (3:3)

Pr. ESS 375 with a grade of C or higher, GPA of 2.50 and admission to the fitness leadership concentration, or permission of instructor; grades of C (2.0) or better in all required ESS courses

Coreq. ESS 376, 467, or permission of instructor

Emphasizes safe and effective testing of elements of health-related physical fitness as outlined by the American College of Sports Medicine. Includes basics of electrocardiogram interpretation and clinical exercise testing. (Fall & Spring)

469 Exercise Prescription (3:3)

Pr. ESS 379, 389, 468, GPA of 2.50 and admission to the fitness leadership concentration, or permission of instructor; grades of C (2.0) or better in all required ESS courses

Scientific principles of exercise prescription for healthy individuals of all ages, individuals at risk for disease, and those with known chronic disease. (Fall & Spring)

471 Internship Preparation in Fitness Leadership (1:1)

Pr. admission to fitness leadership concentration; ESS 375 or permission of instructor

Coreq. ESS 468 or 469 or permission of the instructor

Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP).

Professional preparation, planning, and placement for supervised internship experience (ESS 595). (Fall or Spring)

475 Independent Study (1–3)

Pr. demonstrated competency for independent work and permission of academic adviser, instructor, and undergraduate program coordinator.

Intensive work in area of special interest in physical education. Available to qualified students on recommendation of academic advisor, instructor, and undergraduate program coordinator.

476 Problems Seminar (2:2)

Current problems in field of physical education. Opportunity for student to specialize in a problem of his choice. Emphasis of the problem shall be approved by instructor.

477 Coaching Practicum in a Selected Sport (3:6)

Pr. current First Aid/Sports Safety Certification; upper division students seeking minor in sport coaching, or permission of instructor

Opportunity for prospective coach to assume various responsibilities in coaching a selected sport under the guidance of a qualified coach.

493 Honors Work (3–6)

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major

May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

494 Internship in Aquatic Leadership (3:1:10 or 6:1:20)

Pr. permission of instructor required, in addition to the following: cumulative GPA of 2.50 or better; completion of all ESS core courses; grades of C (2.0) or better in all required ESS courses

An application process must be completed prior to registration.

May be repeated for credit if taken for 3 s.h.; maximum credits may not exceed 6 s.h.

Grade: letter grade.

A supervised field experience in aquatic leadership in qualified agencies. Requirements include specific assignments, supervision, seminars on campus, and evaluation of student’s performance. (Formerly ESS 594)

495 Senior Project (3:3)

Pr. ESS 475; 3.0 GPA; and permission of department

Independent scholarly work in an area of exercise and sport science completed under the supervision of a faculty member, culminating in a scientific report or other appropriate scholarly presentation. (Fall & Spring & Summer)