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Mathematics Courses (MAT)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Courses for Undergraduates

100 Intermediate Algebra (3:3)

Credit does not apply toward graduation nor count in the student’s GPA.

Real numbers and their properties, linear equations, systems of equations, polynomials and functions, fractional expressions, exponents and roots, quadratic equations, graphing, inequalities. (Summer)

112 Contemporary Topics in Mathematics (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Practical mathematical topics including set theory, properties and operations of number systems, algebra, geometry and consumer mathematics. Additional topics may be selected from logic, systems of numeration, and mathematical systems. (Fall & Spring)

115 College Algebra (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Credit can be earned for only one of MAT 115, 119, or 150.

Algebraic expressions, exponents, radicals, factoring, solving equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomial and rational functions. (Fall & Spring)

120 Calculus for Business and the Social Sciences (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Pr. an acceptable score on the mathematics placement test or a grade of at least C in 115 or 119 or 150

Credit cannot be earned for both this course and MAT 191.

NOTE: this course does not serve as a prerequisite for 292 (Calculus II).

Limits and introductory differential calculus of the algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions of one variable. (Fall & Spring)

150 Precalculus I (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Credit can be earned for only one of MAT 115, 119, or 150.

Review of elementary algebra, equations, inequalities, relations, functions, transformations, graphing, complex numbers, polynomial and rational functions. (Fall & Spring) (Formerly MAT 119)

151 Precalculus II (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Pr. an acceptable score on the mathematics placement test or a grade of at least C in 119 or 150

Review of relations, trigonometric (circular) functions and identities, exponential and logarithmic functions, solutions of triangles, equations of second degree and their graphs. (Fall & Spring)

191 Calculus I (3:3)

GE Core: GMT

Pr. an acceptable score on the mathematics placement test, or a grade of at least C in 121 or 151

Credit cannot be received for both this course and MAT 120.

Limits and introductory differential calculus of the algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable. (Fall & Spring)

220 Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 121 or 151 or equivalent

Hours count toward teacher licensure but do not count toward degree requirements for a mathematics major.

Study of conic sections (including rotation of axes), graphing with polar coordinates, quadric surfaces, and vectors. (Spring)

253 Discrete Mathematics I (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 121 or 151, or permission of instructor

Only one of MAT 253 or MAT 295 can count toward degree requirements for a mathematics major.

Mathematical reasoning techniques and concepts in computer science. Topics include sets, functions, sequences, relations, induction and recursion, Boolean algebra, and elementary propositional and predicate logic, including proof techniques. (Fall & Spring)

292 Calculus II (3:3)

Pr. a grade of at least C in 191 or permission of the instructor

Continuation of the study of differential calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, introductory integral calculus of the algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable, techniques of integration. (Fall & Spring)

293 Calculus III (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 292

Indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, Taylor’s formula, numerical methods, conic sections, polar coordinates. (Fall & Spring)

295 Proofs and Mathematical Structures (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 292

At most one of MAT 253 or MAT 295 can count toward degree requirements for a mathematics major.

An introduction to basic mathematical concepts needed for most upper level mathematics courses. The language and logic of proofs, basic set theory, relations, functions, numbers, counting, cardinalities, introduction to algebra.

303 Topics in Mathematics (3:3)

Hours count toward teacher licensure but do not count toward degree requirements for a mathematics major.

Primarily for students seeking grades 6–9 certification. Extensive study of rational, irrational, and real numbers; selected topics from number theory; clock and modular arithmetic. Concrete models used to illustrate many of the mathematical concepts studied.

304 Introduction to the Foundations of Geometry (3:3)

Hours do not count toward degree requirements for Mathematics majors.

Introductory course primarily for students seeking grade 6–9 certification. Designed to develop an understanding of the fundamental ideas of geometry. Includes both an intuitive and deductive study of points, lines, planes, curves, surfaces, congruences, parallelism, similarity and linear, angular, area, and volume measures.

310 Matrix Theory (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 292

Matrices, equivalence relations for square matrices, determinants, finite dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, eigen-vectors. (Fall & Spring)

311 Modern Algebra (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 310

Introduction to theory of groups, rings, integral domains and fields, including basic properties of polynomials. (Fall & Spring)

322 Linear Programming (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in MAT 310

Covers simplex computational procedure, minimum feasible solutions, artificial-basis technique, slack variables, perturbation techniques, cycling, parametric objective and dual problems, sensitivity analysis, and decomposition algorithms.

330 Axiomatic Foundations of Geometry (3:3)

Pr. grade of C (2.0) or better in MAT 292

Required for students seeking secondary licensure in mathematics.

Axiomatic systems, logic and proof, incidence geometries, absolute geometries, Euclidean geometry, and an introduction to non-Euclidean geometries and transformational geometry.

345 Vector and Tensor Analysis (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 293 and 390

Vectors, scalar fields, vector fields. Dot and cross product. Vector differentiation and integration. Gradient, divergence and curl. Green’s theorem, divergence theorem, Stokes’ theorem. Curvilinear coordinates. Tensor Analysis: Physical laws. Coordinate transformations. Contravariant and covariant vectors. Contravariant, covariant, and mixed tensors. Tensor fields. Symmetric and skew-symmetric tensors. Conjugate or reciprocal tensors. Associated tensors. Transformation laws of Christoffel’s symbols. Tensor form of gradient, divergence, and curl.

353 Discrete Mathematics II (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 253 or permission of instructor

Problem-solving and modeling using techniques and concepts of Discrete Mathematics with applications to algorithms. Topics include elementary graph theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, difference equations, and linear algebra. (Fall & Spring)

390 Ordinary Differential Equations (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 292.

First order differential equations and linear equations of finite order, Laplace transforms, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, power series solutions near ordinary or regular singular points, applications, numerical methods. (Spring)

394 Calculus IV (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 293

Vectors, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, vector calculus. (Fall & Spring)

395 Introduction to Mathematical Analysis (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C in 293, 310

Introduction to fundamental concepts of single variable calculus, including properties of real numbers, notion of limit, continuity, differentiation, integration, and infinite series. (Fall)

490 Senior Seminar in Mathematics (1:1)

Pr. senior standing and mathematics major, or permission of instructor

Oral presentations on topics in mathematics, including current mathematics literature. (Fall & Spring)

491 Experimental Course: Introduction to Mathematical Models in Biology (3:3)

Pr. BIO 112; MAT 191 or STA 271; or instructor's permission

Exploration of research and methodology at the interface of mathematics and biology, with an overview of relevant fields and in-depth case studies. Focus will be on mathematical models in biology. (Offered spring '08) (Same as BIO 491)

493 Honors Work (3–6)

Pr. permission of instructor; 3.30 GPA in the major, 12 s.h. in the major

May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.