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Undergraduate Programs

UNCG offers six undergraduate degrees:

BA Bachelor of Arts
BFA Bachelor of Fine Arts .
BM Bachelor of Music
BS Bachelor of Science
BSMT Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology
BSN Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Requirements for A Bachelor's Degree

A bachelor's degree from UNCG is awarded to a student who has met the following requirements:

1. Successful completion of a minimum of 122 semester hours, distributed as follows:
a. Liberal education 45 semester hours (minimum)
b. Major subject and related areas - (as required in program)
c. Electives - (as required in program)
122
2. A grade point average on the hours attempted of not less than 2.0
3. At least 36 semester hours of courses at the 300 level or above
4. Residence at UNCG for the last 31 semester hours

The College of Arts and Sciences and each of the six professional schools - Joseph M. Bryan School of Business and Economics; Education; Health and Human Performance; Human Environmental Sciences; Music; Nursing - have structured their individual degree programs to comply with this all-University degree framework.

Students who are undecided about their major are considered to be enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences and should follow the College requirements (see pp. 70-73). Satisfying these requirements permits a student to pursue a major either in Arts and Sciences or in one of the professional schools.

Studies leading to the baccalaureate degree are offered in the programs listed on the following pages.

Average Time to Graduation

Many factors affect both the length of time and the number of credit hours an individual student will require to complete the baccalaureate degree. At UNCG the median number of months to graduation for full time students is 46. The median number of credit hours completed is 125.

Full time undergraduate students are expected to complete at least 15 credit hours per semester and failure to do so may lengthen the studentís time to graduation. Some majors do require formal admission beyond that required for admission to the University in general.

Students should meet with their academic advisors regularly to plan their academic schedules. To graduate, students must complete specific University requirements as well as requirements within the major. Students who change majors may find that additional requirements must be fulfilled. Changing majors excessively, or after the third or fourth semester of study, may also lengthen the time to graduation. Also see Tuition Surcharge, pp. 27-28.

Criteria for admission to a specific major (outlined in this Bulletin) and continuation in that major may include a University grade point average exceeding that required for continuation within the University as a whole. Students considering such majors should become familiar with the guidelines, and work with an academic advisor as soon as possible to ensure that they meet the criteria.

Changes in Degree Requirements and Other Regulations

The University reserves the right to make changes as required in course offerings, curricula, academic policies and other rules and regulations affecting students, to be effective whenever determined by the University. These changes will govern current and formerly enrolled students. Enrollment of all students is subject to these conditions.

Undergraduate Areas of Study

The following are currently offered undergraduate areas of study. See departmental listings for specific program and degree requirements. The term "Licensure" in the Area of Study description refers to a program that grants teacher licensure. See Chapter 7 for complete details about Teacher Education programs.

The College of Arts and Sciences

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Anthropology
BA
Anthropology
122
Anthropology
Anthropology (Social Studies Licensure)
Art
BA
Art
122
Art History
Studio Art
Museum Studies
BFA
Art
128
Design
Painting
Sculpture
BFA
Art
128
Art Education I (general) (Special Subject Area
Licensure)
Art Education II (studio) (Special Subject Area
Licensure)
Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Biology
BA
Biology
122
Biology
Biology (Secondary Licensure)
Biotechnology
Environmental Biology
BS
Biology
122
Biology
Biotechnology
Environmental Biology
Biopsychology
Biopsychology; taken as second major only
BSMT
Medical Technology
124
Medical Technology
Broadcasting/Cinema
BA
Drama
122
Drama & Theatre Theatre Arts (Special Subject Area Licensure)
BFA
Drama
124
Acting
Design & Technical Theatre
BA
Media Studies
122
Media Studies
Chemistry
BA
Chemistry
122
Chemistry
Chemistry (Secondary Licensure)
BS
Chemistry
122
Chemistry
Chemistry (Secondary Licensure)
Classical Studies
BA
Classical Studies
122
Latin Language & Literature
Latin (Secondary Licensure)
Greek Language & Literature
Classical Civilization
Classical Archaeology
Communication
BA
Speech Communication
122
Communication Studies
Organizational Communication & Public
Relations
BS
Speech Pathology
122
Speech Pathology & Audiology
BS
Education of
128-129
Teacher Preparation (Special Subject Area
the DeafLicensure)
Educational Interpreter
English
BA
English
122
English
English (Secondary Licensure)
Geography
BA
Geography
122
Geography
Geography (Social Studies Licensure)
Earth Science/Environmental Studies
Urban Planning
German & Russian
BA
German
122
German
German (Special Subject Area Licensure)
History
BA
History
122
History
History (Social Studies Licensure)
Mathematical Sciences
BS
Computer Science
122
Computer Science
BA
Mathematics
122
Mathematics
Mathematics (Secondary Licensure)
Computer Science
Statistics
BS
Mathematics
122
Mathematics
Computer Science
Statistics
Philosophy
BA
Philosophy
122
Philosophy
Pre-law
Physics & Astronomy
BA
Physics
122
Physics
Physics (Secondary Licensure)
BS
Physics
122
Physics
Physics (Secondary Licensure)
Political Science
BA
Political Science
122
Political Science
Political Science (Social Studies Licensure)
Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Psychology
BA
Psychology
122
Psychology
Psychology (Social Studies Licensure)
Biopsychology
Biopsychology; taken as second major only
Religious Studies
BA
Religious Studies
122
Religious Studies
Romance Languages
BA
French
122
French (Special Subject Area Licensure)
BA
Spanish
122
Spanish
Spanish (Special Subject Area Licensure)
Sociology
BA
Sociology
122
Sociology (Social Studies Licensure)

Special Programs in Liberal Studies (sponsored by College of Arts & Sciences)

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Interdepartmental
African American Studies; taken as minor only
Interdepartmental
BA
Special Programs
122
Archaeology
Interdepartmental
BS
Special Programs
127
International Business*
Interdepartmental
BA
Special Programs
122
International Studies, with the following options:
Global Affairs & International Development
Inter-Cultural Studies
Regional Studies with emphases in:
Russian Studies
European Studies; taken as second major/minor
Asian Studies; taken as minor only
African Studies; taken as minor only
Interdepartmental
BA
Special Programs
122
Linguistics
Interdepartmental
BA
Special Programs
122
Women's Studies

*

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Bryan School of Business and Economics jointly sponsor the International Business program.

Joseph M. Bryan School of Business and Economics

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Accounting
BS
Accounting
122
Accounting
Business Administration
BS
Business Administration
122
Business Administration
BS
Finance, Insurance,
128
Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate
& Real Estate
BS
Management/Marketing
122
Human Resources
Management
Marketing
Merchandising Management
Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship
BS
Business Education
122
Business Education (Vocational Education Licensure)
BS
Marketing Education
122
Marketing Education (Vocational Education Licensure)
Economics
BA
Economics
122
Economics
Economics (Social Studies Licensure)
Financial Economics
BS
Economics
122
Economics
Economics (Social Studies Licensure)
Financial Economics
Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Information Systems
BS
Information Systems
122
Information Systems
& Operations Management
& Operations Mgt
Office Systems Administration
Operations Management

School of Education

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Curriculum & Instruction
BS
Elementary Education
127
Elementary Education (K-6 Licensure)
BS
Middle Grades Education
128
MIddles Grades Education (6-9 Licensure)

School of Health and Human Performance

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Dance
BA
Dance
122
Dance
BFA
Dance
128
Dance
BS
Dance Education
128
Dance Education (Special Subject Area Licensure)
Exercise & Sport Science
BS
Exercise & Sport Sci
122
Aquatics Leadership
BS
Exercise & Sport Sci
122
Exercise & Sport Studies
BS
Exercise & Sport Sci
125-128
Physical Education Teacher Education (Special Subject Area Licensure)
Leisure Studies
BS
Leisure Studies
122
Leisure Servcies Management
Therapeutic Recreation
Travel, Tourism, and Commercial Recreation
Public Health Education
BS
Health Education
124
Community Health Education
125-128
School Health Education (Special Subject Area Licensure)

School of Human Environmental Sciences

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Clothing & Textiles
BS
Clothing & Textiles
122
Textile Products Marketing Textile Products Design
Food, Nutrition, &
BS
Food & Nutrition
122
Restaurant & Institution Management
Food Service Management Nutrition Science
Dietetics Area
Housing & Interior Design
BS
Interior Design
142
Interior Design. This is a five-year program.
Human Development
BS
Human Development
122
Developmental Foundations in Preschool
& Family Studies
& Family Studies Education (non-licensure option)
Developmental Foundations in Preschool
Education (Birth-Kindergarten Licensure)
Child & Adolescent Development in the Family
Adult Development & Aging in the Family
Business & Community Services for Individuals
& Families
Social Work
BS
Social Work
122
Social Work
School Social Work (Licensure)

School of Music

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
BA
Music
122
General Music
Music History
BM
Performance
128
Voice, Keyboard, Strings, Brass, Woodwinds,
Percussion
BM
Performance: Jazz
128
Jazz
BM
Composition
128
Composition
BM
Choral/General Music
128
Keyboard, Voice, Guitar (Special Subject Area
Education Licensure)
BM
Instrumental Music
128
Keyboard, Strings, Brass, Woodwinds, Education Percussion
(Special Subject Area Licensure)

School of Nursing

Dept Degree Majors Hrs Req Areas of Study

BSN Nursing 122 Nursing

Accelerated Masters Programs for Undergraduates*

Dept
Degree
Majors
Hrs Req
Areas of Study
Anthropology/Economics
BA/MA
Anthropology/Economics
122/30-33
Same as majors
Anthropology/Business Administration
BA/MBA
Anthropology/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Biology/Chemistry
BA/MS
Biology/Chemistry
122/30
Same as majors
Business-Marketing Educ/Bus Educ
BS/MSBE
Business-Mrk Edu/Bus Educ
122/33
Same as majors
Chemistry/Chemistry
BS/MS
Chemistry/Chemistry
122/30
Same as majors
Chemistry/Business Administration
BS/MBA
Chemistry/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Economics/Economics
BA/MA
Economics/Economics
122/30-33
Same as majors
Economics/Political Science
BA/MPA
Economics/Public Affairs
122/42
Same as majors
French/Business Administration
BA/MBA
French/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
German/Business Administration
BA/MBA
German/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Special Programs in Liberal
BA/MA
Spec Prgms-Linguistics/English
122/36
Same as majors
Studies-Linguistics/English
Mathematics/Mathematics
BA, BS/
Mathematics/Mathematics
122/30,33
Same as majors
MA,MEd
Music/Business Administration
BA/MBA
Music/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Physics/Business Administration
BA/MBA
Physics/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Political Science/Economics
BA/MA
Political Science/Economics
122/30-33
Same as majors
Political Science/Business Administration
BA/MBA
Political Science/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors
Political Science/Political Science
BA/MPA
Political Science/Public Affairs
122/42
Same as majors
Spanish/Business Administration
BA/MBA
Spanish/Business Adm
122/43.5
Same as majors

*Accelerated Masters Programs are intended primarily for new freshmen who qualify for Advanced Placlement Credit. All require early and careful planning with the major department beginning in the freshman year. Please see an advisor for further details.

Other Special Academic Programs

See Chapter 6 for complete details and descriptions.

Freshman Seminars
Honors Program
Plan II
Residential College
Study Abroad
Preprofessional Programs in
Dentistry
Engineering
Law
Medicine
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
Veterinary Medicine

All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER)

Undergraduates who initiated college-level course work from regionally accredited post-secondary institutions Fall 1991 and later must meet All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). Undergraduates who initiated college-level course work from regionally accredited post-secondary institutions prior to Fall 1991 may be entitled to complete pre-1991 liberal education requirements. These students should consult with the Office of Academic Advising and Support Services to determine their options and to obtain a list of courses approved to meet pre-AULER requirements.

Forty-five semester hours of course work comprise a minimal core of fundamental knowledge and intellectual skills which the faculty at UNCG believe all university-educated persons should possess. These hours are organized into the areas described on the following page. Courses satisfying these requirements have been approved by the appropriate University Instructional Area committee, the College Council of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. Each committee has reviewed from a different perspective the courses proposed. Guidelines followed in the selection process included: selecting only those courses considered to be fundamental, basic, and central to the instructional category; keeping the number of courses in each category as small as possible, emphasizing breadth of coverage rather than depth of examination; and, preferring courses open to freshmen and sophomores that have no prerequisites.

All undergraduate degree programs have AULER requirements. With few exceptions, the full 45 semester hours are required. Certain professional programs have been permitted to reduce slightly the number of AULER credits required in order to meet accreditation or licensing standards. Such exceptions are clearly shown in the descriptions of these special professional programs. In addition, programs in the College of Arts and Sciences may exceed the requirements in several categories. These differences are noted in the appropriate description of College/School requirements for a particular program.

The list of courses which satisfy AULER may be modified from time to time. The student's advisor is an additional source of information on the status of courses which currently meet the requirements.

The table on the following page provides a brief description of each Liberal Education Requirement Area as well as indicating the number of semester hours which are required in that area. A complete list of currently approved AULER courses follows the table.

* Students are reminded that they will be eligible for election to the UNCG chapter of Phi Beta Kappa only if they have completed the equivalent of six semester hours of foreign language study at the intermediate college level.

All-University Liberal Education Requirements by Areas

Semester Hours

1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies A study of abstract systems of thought and evaluative concepts fundamental to intellectual inquiry and values: includes ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, historiography, religious thought and traditions, and cultural anthropology.
2. British or American Literature A study of selected major works of prose and poetry written in Britain or the United States.
3. Fine Arts A study of how ideas and feelings are shaped into artistic form in the visual arts, theatre, cinema, dance, or music.
4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture A study from an historical point of view of formative periods in Western culture, looking at fundamental ideas, institutions, philosophical traditions, or literary and artistic masterpieces.
5. Mathematics A study of major concepts, theories, methods, and applications of the mathematical sciences.
6. Natural Science A study of basic physical or biological sciences with attention to the methods of scientific investigation.
7. Non-Western Studies A study of fundamental cultural forms, expression, socio-political structures, and habits of mind that are distinctly different from Western cultural traditions.
8. Reasoning and Discourse Training in reasoning well, reading critically, writing cogently, or speaking persuasively.
9. Social and Behavioral Sciences A study of individuals, society, and human institutions and systems with an emphasis on the effect of social and environmental factors on individual experiences and behavior, and on the structures and mechanisms of societies.
10. World Literature A study of selected major works of prose and poetry written outside of Britain and the United States.
11. Electives Six additional hours in a foreign language* at any level or from any of the areas specified above.
Total Semester Hours Required by AULER

AP Indicates that AP credit is available in these categories; see pp. 20-21 for AP course listings

Approved AULER Courses

As of the date of this publication, the following courses have been selected to satisfy the requirement in the areas designated. The appropriate distribution designation (AE, BL, FA, HP, MT, NS, NW, RD, SB, WL) also appears after the description of courses in the respective departments.

Approved AULER Courses by Area


Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE)
3 Semester Hours Required

Anthropology 213, 360

Freshman Seminar in Analytic and Evaluative Studies 106

History 311, 360, 366

Honors 208

Philosophy 111, 119, 121, 220, 231, 259

Political Science 105

Religion 104, 107, 109, 110, 207, 226, 228, 309, 365

Residential College 210-219

Women's Studies 350

British or American Literature (BL)
3 Semester Hours Required

Communication Studies 320

English 104, 105, 106, 107, 211, 212, 251, 252, 331, 339, 340, 341

Freshman Seminar in British or American Literature 110

Honors 205a

Residential College 220-229

Fine Arts (FA)

3 Semester Hours Required

Art 100, 101, 323

Broadcasting/Cinema and Theatre 121, 171, 221, 250, 323, 582

Dance 100, 200, 201, 202, 323

Freshman Seminar in Fine Arts 105

Honors 205c

Music 214, 241, 323

Residential College 230-239

Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (HP)

3 Semester Hours Required

African American Studies 100

Classical Civilization 201, 202, 211, 212, 220, 323

Communication Studies 205

Freshman Seminar in Historical Perspectives on Western Culture 101, 102

Geography 102

History 211, 212, 220, 221, 222, 223, 251, 252, 301, 302, 327, 335, 336, 357, 368, 369, 373, 374, 397

Philosophy 251, 252

Religion 131, 202, 204, 210, 212

Residential College 240-249

Western Civilization 101, 102

Mathematics (MT)

3 Semester Hours Required

Mathematics 112, 119, 120, 121, 191

Residential College 110-119

Statistics 108

Natural Science (NS)

6 Semester Hours Required

Anthropology 253, 331

Biology 105, 111, 112

Chemistry 103, 104, 106, 110, 111, 112, 114, 115

Clothing and Textiles 211

Food and Nutrition 213

Freshman Seminar in Natural Science 104, 104L

Geography 103, 111, 111L, 311, 311L, 314, 314L

Honors 207a, 207b

Physics 203, 205, 205L, 209, 211, 212, 235, 291, 292

Psychology 230

Residential College 250-259

Non-Western Studies (NW)
3 Semester Hours Required

Anthropology 100, 325, 330, 333, 335, 337, 345

Broadcasting/Cinema and Theatre 586

Clothing and Textiles 121

Freshman Seminar in Non-Western Studies 109

Geography 104, 114, 303

History 203, 204, 215, 216, 239, 240, 361, 377, 381, 383, 384, 385, 386, 389

International Studies 233A

Music 343

Political Science 290, 391

Religion 111, 211, 218, 220, 221, 225, 351

Residential College 260-269

Sociology 242, 300

Women's Studies 333

Reasoning and Discourse (RD)
6 Semester Hours Required

English 101 or Freshman Seminar in Reasoning and Discourse 103 or Residential College 101 and one of the following courses:

Communication Studies 105, 231, 341

English 102, 223, 301

Philosophy 115, 211

Residential College 102

Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB)

6 Semester Hours Required

African American Studies 210

Anthropology 201, 212, 258

Communication Studies 106

Economics 101, 201, 202

Education of Deaf Children 240

Exercise and Sport Science 330

Freshman Seminar in Social and Behavioral Science 108

Geography 105, 202, 301, 344

Health 201, 260

Honors 206

Human Development and Family Studies 211, 212, 302

Political Science 200, 210, 240, 260

Psychology 121

Residential College 270-279

Sociology 201, 211, 222, 232

Social Work 311

World Literature (WL)

3 Semester Hours Required

Classical Civilization 205, 305, 306, 321, 324, 325

English 201, 202, 315, 371

Freshman Seminar in World Literature 107

French 222, 303, 307, 308

German 217, 218, 221

Honors 205b

Italian 222

Residential College 280-289

Russian 201, 202, 313, 315, 316

Spanish 222, 305, 306

Electives

6 Semester Hours Required

Six additional hours from any of the areas specified above or in a foreign language at any level.

Total Semester Hours Required 45

In addition to the above listed courses, students may receive AULER credit for courses taken in three overseas programs offered by the University's Office of International Programs:

Fall Semester in Britain

Language and Literature of Twentieth Century Criticism (FA)

European Nations and States (HP)

Sociology: European Social Structures (SB)

Political Science: British Institutions and Politics (SB)

Human Geography: The Making of Europe (HP)

Environmental Principles (NS)

Fall Semester in Finland

Cultures and Societies of Scandinavia (SB)

Indigenous Cultures of the Polar Region (NW)

Arts of Scandinavia (FA)

Finnish and Scandinavian Literature in Translation (WL)

Nordic Nature and Environment (NS)

Spring Semester in Poland

Arts in Contemporary Poland (FA)

Culture and Society in Contemporary Poland (SB)

Evolution of Political Systems in Eastern Europe (SB)

History of Poland (HP)

Transition of Central European Countries to Market Economies (SB)

For information about these courses contact the Office of International Programs, 112 Foust Building, UNCG, 910/334-5404.



Additional degree requirements have been established by the College of Arts and Sciences. Students who are undecided as to a major as well as those majoring in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, communication and theatre, English, French, geography, German, Greek, history, interdepartmental studies, Latin, mathematics, medical technology, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and Spanish are affected by these requirements. For these students the liberal education requirements total 54-55 hours, and are described in detail on p. 71. Students who satisfy the College requirements will also satisfy the All-University requirements.


Major Requirements

Each school or department establishes the course requirements for each major program, concentrations within a major, and related-area requirements.

Special Curriculum Option (Plan II)

For students whose needs are not met by the formal majors and degrees offered at UNCG, a special curriculum option-called Plan II-allows students to design their own course of study in consultation with appropriate faculty.

Students desiring to pursue Plan II should be advised that there is no guarantee that their proposed program will lead to graduation until it has been fully approved. Developing a program is a time consuming process, often taking one year from initial intent to final approval. Students must file a statement of intent to pursue Plan II in the Office of Academic Advising and Support Services prior to registering for their last 45 hours. Required steps have been adopted by the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for approving Plan II programs. The following is an abbreviated description of the procedures that must be followed:

1. Consult with the Director of Academic Advising and Support Services regarding general requirements and procedures. All general University requirements and minimum admission requirements for the desired departmental programs must be met by any Plan II program.
2. Select a faculty advisor with expertise in the interdisciplinary major.
3. Select another member of the faculty to serve on an advisory committee.
4. Develop a formal proposal with the committee.
5. Send proposal to Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.

Minor modifications to an approved Plan II program may be made if approved by both the faculty advisor and the Director of Academic Advising and Support Services. Other modifications require the full process outlined.

Guide to Course Descriptions

In the following pages, the academic programs and course offerings of the University are set forth.

Regularly scheduled undergraduate classes for which fewer than ten students enroll (or graduate classes for which fewer than five students enroll) will be offered only with special approval of the Provost. If enrollment does not justify continuation of a class, the class may not be offered.

Each course description is represented by a three-letter symbol (indicating the department or program within which the course is taken) and a three-digit number. After each course title are two (or three) numbers separated by colons which indicate semester hours credit, lecture, and laboratory hours. Following the credit indicator any course prerequisites will be listed. The course description itself may be followed by special area credit indicators (AULER, CLER) and frequency of offering symbols. Special course information is highlighted.

Program and Course Schedule Symbols

ACC Accounting
AFS African American Studies
ATY Anthropology
ART Art
BCT Broadcasting/Cinema & Theatre
BIO Biology
BME Business & Marketing Education
BUS Business Administration
CHE Chemistry
CCI Classical Civilization
CTX Clothing & Textiles
CED Counseling & Educational Development
CSC Computer Science
CSD Communication Sciences & Disorders
CST Communication Studies
CUI Curriculum and Instruction
DCE Dance
ECO Economics
EDC Education of Deaf Children
ELC Educational Leadership and Cultural Foundations
ENG English
ERM Educational Research Methodology
ESS Exercise and Sport Science
FIN Finance
FMS Freshman Seminars Program
FNS Food, Nutrition, & Food Service Management
FRE French
GEO Geography
GER German
GRK Greek
HEA Health
HIS History
HSS Honors Program
HID Housing & Interior Design
HDF Human Development & Family Studies
ISM Information Systems & Operations Management
INS International Studies
ITA Italian
JNS Japanese Studies
LAT Latin
LES Leisure Studies
LIS Library & Information Studies
MGT Management
MKT Marketing
MAT Mathematics
MBA Master's in Business Administration
MLS Master's in Liberal Studies
MUS Music
NUR Nursing
PHI Philosophy
PHY Physics and Astronomy
PSC Political Science
PSY Psychology
REL Religious Studies
RCO Residential College
RUS Russian
SWK Social Work
SOC Sociology
SPA Spanish
STA Statistics
UNS University Studies
WCV Western Civilization
WMS Women's Studies

Course Numbers and Levels

Course level numbers are structured as follows:

100-199-intended primarily for freshmen

200-299-intended primarily for sophomores

300-399-intended primarily for juniors

400-499-intended primarily for seniors

500-599-intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students; these courses are not open to freshmen and sophomores

600-749-restricted to students who are classified as graduate students

750-799-restricted to students admitted to doctoral programs

Course descriptions for graduate-level courses are printed in the Graduate School Catalog.

Course Credit Hours

The first of the figures enclosed in parentheses immediately following the course title indicates the number of semester hour credits given for the course. The second and third figures indicate the number of lecture and laboratory hours, respectively, normally scheduled each week for one semester in the course. For example, (3:2:3) means the course carries three semester hour credits and meets for two lecture hours and three laboratory hours each week. A class period is 50 minutes. Graduate courses and certain other courses may have only one figure enclosed in parentheses. For such courses the figure indicates the number of semester hours credit given. When only one or two figures appear in the parentheses, there are no laboratory or studio hour requirements.

Two course numbers separated by a comma indicate a sequence of two courses with closely related content.

Course Prerequisites/Corequisites

Prerequisites or corequisites for a course are indicated in the course description by "Pr." or "Coreq." followed by appropriate requirements which must be met before that course may be taken. A student may not enroll in a course without the proper prerequisites unless these prerequisites have been waived by the head of the department in which the course is offered.

Grading Method

All courses are graded by letter grade (A-F) unless otherwise noted in the course description. The following undergraduate/advanced undergraduate courses are graded P/NP (Pass/Not Pass) and are so noted in their descriptions: CSC 312; CSD 219, 571; CUI 299A & B, 399 A, B, C & D, 461, 462, 499A; DCE 250, 461, 462; ESS 461, 462, 594, 595; GRK 150; HEA 428, 461, 462; LES 315, 417; MUS 090, 091; RUS 150.

Repeat-for-Credit Notation

Some courses may be repeated for credit under special circumstances. Such information is highlighted in the course description.

Frequency of Course Offering

Many courses listed in this Bulletin reflect the semester(s) in which they are offered. This information is indicated in parentheses at the end of the course description as follows:

(FA,SP) course usually offered in both Fall and Spring semester
(FA/SP) course usually offered in either Fall or Spring semester
(FA/SP/SU) course usually offered in either Fall, Spring, or Summer
(FA) course usually offered Fall only
(SP) course usually offered Spring only
(SU) course usually offered summer session only
Even,Odd course usually offered only in even or odd semesters or years
Alt course usually offered only in alternate years

Equivalent Course Credit

A number of undergraduate courses have course content which is considered equivalent to other similar courses. Other courses are cross-listed with courses taught in a different department. Ordinarily students can only take one of such equivalent or cross-listed courses for credit. Course descriptions carry information concerning equivalencies if any exist. Students should be aware of such equivalencies before registering in order to avoid taking a course for which they will not receive additional credit.

All-University Liberal Education Requirement Abbreviations (AULER)

Courses approved as meeting requirements in the general areas of knowledge are indicated by one of the following abbreviations in brackets at the end of the course description:

AE Analytic and Evaluative Studies
BL British or American Literature
FA Fine Arts
HP Historical Perspectives on Western Culture
MT Mathematics
NS Natural Science
NW Nonwestern Studies
RD Reasoning and Discourse
SB Social and Behavioral Sciences
WL World Literature

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirement Abbreviations (CLER)

Courses approved to satisfy the liberal education requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences are indicated by one of the following abbreviations in brackets at the end of the course description:

CAE Analytic and Evaluative Studies
CBL British or American Literature
CFA Fine Arts
CFL Foreign Language
CHP/ Historical Perspectives
CPM on WesternCulture, Pre-Modern
CHP/ Historical Perspectives on
CMO Western Culture, Modern
CLS Life Science
CMT Mathematics
CNW Nonwestern Studies
CPS Physical Science
CRD Reasoning and Discourse
CSB Social and Behavioral Sciences
CWL World Literature

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

105 Foust Building

Walter H. Beale, Professor and Dean of the College

Timothy D. Johnston, Professor and Associate Dean

William A. Link, Professor and Associate Dean

Sheila Schurer, Assistant to the Dean

The College of Arts and Sciences is composed of the departments of Anthropology, Art, Biology, Broadcasting/Cinema and Theatre, Chemistry, Classical Studies, Communication, English, Geography, German and Russian, History, Mathematical Sciences, Philosophy, Physics and Astronomy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Romance Languages, and Sociology. It also includes the Residential College and the Center for Critical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts, which sponsors such cross-disciplinary programs as Special Programs in Liberal Studies, the Honors Program, Freshman Seminars, andi "Strong College," a residential community. See Chapter 6 for further information. The basic undergraduate degree of the College is the Bachelor of Arts, traditionally a liberal arts degree. While other degrees offered by the College (Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology, and Bachelor of Fine Arts) contain professional and technical studies, they are primarily programs in the liberal arts.

Through its faculty, courses, and programs, the College of Arts and Sciences encourages intellectual inquiry and development of the knowledge and skills that enable critical examination of traditions and assumptions. A liberal education prepares students for informed and reflective participation in society, for sustained cultural and aesthetic enjoyment, and for a lifetime of learning.

Freedom and self-motivation in the context of a rational plan of disciplined study are fundamental to a liberal arts education. Students are encouraged to seek relationships among the various subjects studied and to develop a coherent intellectual perspective. To aid in this process, the College requirements build upon the All University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (see pp. 64-66).

College Requirements

Included in the list below are the College requirements that differ from AULER along with the designated courses that meet those requirements.

1.
Writing-Intensive Courses
To emphasize the importance of writing both as an essential skill and as a tool for learning, the College requires students to take four Writing-Intensive courses. The Writing-Intensive courses offered each semester are designated by a "W" in the printed semester Schedule of Courses.
a. At least one of the four Writing-Intensive courses must be in the lower division (200 and below), at least one in the upper division (300 and above), and at least one in the department or program of the student's primary major.
b. Students transferring to UNCG as sophomores are required to take three Writing-Intensive courses, distributed as in 1-a above. Students transferring to UNCG as juniors are required to take two Writing-Intensive courses.
NOTE:
Writing-Intensive courses may also meet AULER, College, or major requirements.
Students who obtain a score of 5 on the English Advanced Placement Literature and Composition examination are exempted from one of the required lower-division writing-intensive courses. Contact the Department of English for further information.
College Requirements by Area (CLER)
Semester Hours
2.
Analytic and Evaluative Studies (CAE)
3
3.
British or American Literature (CBL)
3AP
4.
Fine Arts (CFA)
3AP
5.
Historical Perspectives on Western Culture
6AP
Six hours required, including one course from each category:
a.
Pre-Modern (CPM) (3 hours) CCI 201, 202, 211, 212, 220, 323; FMS 101; HIS 220, 221, 222, 251, 357, 368, 369, 373; PHI 251; RCO 240-249; REL 202, 204, 210; WCV 101
b.
Modern (CMO) (3 hours) AFS 100; CST 205; FMS 102; GEO 102; HIS 211, 212, 223, 252, 301, 302, 327, 335, 336, 374, 397; PHI 252; RCO 240-249; REL 131, 212; WCV 102
6.
Mathematics (CMT)
3AP
7.
Natural Science
9-10AP
Nine to ten hours required including one laboratory course (indicated by an asterisk),
and at least one course from each category:
a.
Physical Science (CPS)
(3-7 hours)
CHE 103, 104, 106, 110*, 111, 112*, 114, 115*, FMS 104, 104L*; CTX 211; GEO 103, 111, 111L*, 311, 311L*, 314, 314L*; HSS 207a1; PHY 203, 205, 205L*, 209, 211*, 212*, 235, 291*, 292*; RCO 110-119
b.<

Life Science (CLS) (3-7 hours) ATY 253*, 331; BIO 111*, 112*, 105; FMS 104, 104L*; FNS 213; HSS 207b1; PSY 230; RCO 110-119
Note:
FMS 104 may carry either CPS or CLS credit; check with advisor or Registrar
8.
Non-Western Studies (CNW)
3
9.
Reasoning and Discourse (CRD)
6AP
10.
Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSB)
9AP
Nine hours required: three courses from three different departments
11.
World Literature (CWL)
3
12.
Foreign Language (CFL)
6 or proficiencyAP
Intermediate-level proficiency in one language required. Proficiency may be demonstrated by placement test or by completing coursework (through course number 204**) in: French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, Russian, Spanish.** In German, proficiency may also be demonstrated by completing GER 311. Non-native speakers of English are exempted from the College foreign language requirement.

AP Indicates that AP credit is available in these categories; see pp. 20-21 for AP course listings.

In addition to the above listed courses, students may receive CLER credit for courses taken in three overseas programs offered by the University's Office of International Programs:

Fall Semester in Britain

Language and Literature of Twentieth Century Criticism (CFA)

European Nations and States (CHP-CMO)

Sociology: European Social Structures (CSB-SOC)

Political Science: British Institutions and Politics (CSB-PSC)

Human Geography: The Making of Europe (CHP-CPM)

Environmental Principles (CPS)

Fall Semester in Finland

Cultures and Societies of Scandinavia (CSB)

Indigenous Cultures of the Polar Region (CNW)

Arts of Scandinavia (CFA)

Finnish and Scandinavian Literature in Translation (CWL)

Nordic Nature and Environment (CLS)

Spring Semester in Poland

Arts in Contemporary Poland (CFA)

Culture and Society in Contemporary Poland (CSB-SOC)

Evolution of Political Systems in Eastern Europe (CSB-PSC)

History of Poland (CHP-CMO)

Transition of Central European Countries to Market Economies (CSB-ECO)

For information about these courses contact the Office of International Programs, 112 Foust Building, UNCG, 910/334-5404.


All students in the College must fulfill the foregoing College Requirements. A course in the major may be used to satisfy College liberal education requirements.

Requirements for each of the degrees offered by the College of Arts and Sciences are included in the descriptions of majors, concentrations, and minors under the respective departments.

Major Requirements

Major requirements are described for each program listed. A course cross-listed in the major department must be taken within the major and counts toward the total hours in the major.

Minor Requirements

Most departments and interdepartmental programs of the College offer a minor program which may be taken in conjunction with a major. In general, a minor requires 15 to 21 hours in a department or area with no more than 8 hours at the 100 level and no fewer than 9 hours taken at UNCG.

Second Majors

A student may take a second major in conjunction with the first major. This program requires a minimum of 24 semester hours in each of two approved majors. All requirements of each major must be met; hours from the second major can be applied toward the University-wide distribution requirements (AULER). A student with a first major outside the College who chooses a second major in one of the College departments is required to complete all of the departmental requirements for the second major but need not satisfy the College liberal education requirements. In the case of transfer students, at least 12 hours in each major must be taken at UNCG. Students wishing to complete a second major should contact the Office of the Director of Academic Advising and Support Services so that an advisor can be appointed in each major.

Special Academic Programs
(see Chapters 6 and 7)

Freshman Seminars

Honors Program

Medical Technology

Plan II

Preprofessional Programs

Residential College

Special Programs in Liberal Studies

Study Abroad

Teacher Education

Student-Designed Interdisciplinary
Major (SDIM)

The Student-Designed Interdisciplinary Major (SDIM) is an option available to students whose academic goals are not adequately served by any major, or combination of majors, second majors, and minors, available in the College of Arts and Sciences or in one of the professional schools.

Students selecting the SDIM option must satisfy all College Liberal Education Requirements and meet all University academic regulations. The option may not be used as a way of circumventing the requirements of an established major and SDIM Plans (see below) that constitute only minor changes to an existing major will not be approved. An SDIM Plan must represent a coherent academic program of study, not simply a collection of courses assembled to enable a student to obtain a degree.

The procedure for requesting approval of an SDIM is as follows:

1. A faculty member in the College must agree to serve as the student's advisor and to take responsibility for helping the student design a plan of study and for monitoring the student's progress. A student who wishes to pursue a SDIM, but is unsure which faculty to ask to serve as his or her advisor, should consult initially with the Associate Dean of the College (Timothy D. Johnston, Room 100, Foust Building).

2. The student and the advisor devise a Plan of Study for the major. The Plan consists of:

(1)
a brief paragraph describing the aims and intentions of the proposed major, and explaining why no existing major or combination of majors, second majors, or minors can be used to pursue those aims;
(2)
a list of courses (minimum of 24 credits) that will constitute the major;
(3)
either a list of courses or a narrative paragraph explaining how the student will satisfy (or has satisfied) the College's Liberal Education, foreign language, and writing-intensive requirements.
The student's advisor should ensure that courses included in the Plan are in fact offered with reasonable frequency; not all courses listed in the bulletin will be available with sufficient frequency to ensure timely graduation.
3.
The Plan is initially submitted to the Associate Dean of the College for review. The Associate Dean will ensure that the Plan meets all the requirements noted above and will send copies of the approved Plan to the student, the major advisor, and the Office of Academic Advising and Support Services.
4.
A student planning to graduate with a SDIM should submit the Plan of Study for review as soon as possible, but in any case prior to registering for the last 45 credit hours needed for graduation.
5.
Any changes to the Plan after it has been submitted must be approved by the Associate Dean, who will forward the modified Plan to the Office of Academic Advising and Support Services. Generally, modifications will only be approved because some of the approved courses have become unavailable or because a new course appears to be better suited to the Plan than one that was originally included.

 
 
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