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Department of Communication
102 Ferguson Building

IntroductionCommunication Studies Major (BA)Communication Studies MinorSpeech Pathology and Audiology Major (BS)Education of Deaf Children Major (BS)Teacher Preparation concentrationEducational Interpreter concentrationCommunication Studies CoursesCommunication Sciences and Disorders CoursesEducation of Deaf Children Courses

 
H. L. Goodall, Jr., Professor and Head of Department
Professors E. Shroyer, Smith; Associate Professors Cimorelli, Natalle, Newton; Assistant Professors Barrett, Compton, Dietrich, Hinton, Kellett; Visiting Assistant Professors Alvarez, Swartz, Tucker; Lecturers Brandon, Ferguson, Mankoff, Matthews, McCready, S. Shroyer, Stratton, Torres

The Department of Communication offers students a variety of areas of study in the theory and practice of human communication. The Communication Studies Program offers coursework in interpersonal, organizational, and public communication. The Communication Sciences and Disorders Program focuses on the study of both normal and disordered aspects of speech, language and hearing. The Education of Deaf Children Program offers concentrations in teacher preparation at preschool, elementary and secondary levels, and in educational interpreting. All programs help students to become more effective communicators as well as facilitators of effective communication in others. Specifically, the Communication Studies Program offers the BA in Communication Studies as well as an undergraduate minor. The Communication Sciences and Disorders Program offers the BS in Speech Pathology and Audiology. The Education of Deaf Children Program offers the BS in Education of the Deaf. In addition, Communication Studies offers the MA and MEd degrees, and Communication Sciences and Disorders offers the MA degree. For details on graduate programs, see The Graduate School Bulletin.

The mission of the Communication Studies Program is "to teach students the study of strategic and ethical uses of communication to build relationships and communities." The undergraduate curriculum is based solidly in our core values: (1) we teach strategies for communication effectiveness if all contexts of application; (2) we teach ethics as a way of informing choices about strategies as well as a ways of improving our ability to intelligently consume and interpret public messages; (3) we teach ways and means of understanding and improving personal, professional, and mediated relationships, and (4) we teach ways and means of understanding and contributing productively to the evolution and changes in our personal, professional, and mediated communities.

Communication Studies offers and additive approach to curricular design so that courses at the lower levels (e.g. 100 and 200 levels) lead into courses at the upper levels in an effort to reinforce and extend our core values through the four-year plan of study. Courses are also designed to make productive use of differing learning styles among students: theoretical and applied, textual and experiential, topical and case studies, coursework and internships, individual and group/team based performances. The capstone experience in each student's program of study is an individualized, semester-long, community-based research project that culminates in public presentation and evaluation. Throughout the program, each student will work with her or his advisor to develop a professional portfolio of materials and accomplishments.

The Communication Studies program provides opportunities to study interpersonal, organizational, and public communication. These areas encompass rhetorical and communication theory, public persuasion and argument, group communication, political communication, political communication, and public relations. Communication Studies courses contribute to a liberal education by teaching creative thinking and problem-solving, critical reasoning, and effective oral, written, and mediated communication. The faculty strongly believes in the interdisciplinary nature of communication and this curriculum encourages elective hours to be taken in allied disciplines such as Anthropology; Broadcasting, Cinema, and Theatre; Business; English; Political Science; Philosophy; Psychology; Sociology; and Women's Studies. Additionally, the Department of Communication Studies participates in the College of Arts and Sciences' Honors Program and regularly offers Freshman Seminars. Opportunities exist for Study Abroad including exchanges in Europe. Communication Studies majors with a 3.0 GPA may go abroad the spring semester of the Junior year to participate in the Intercultural Studies Program at Vaxjo University in Vaxjo, Sweden. The program (taught in English) requires coursework in sociocultural theory, intercultural interactions, cultural analysis, and field work with optional study in basic Swedish.

The undergraduate program in Communication Studies is designed to serve as a solid foundation for a variety of professional and entrepreneurial careers; it also provides preparatory work for graduate study in communication, as well as in related fields such as law, business, media studies, and the ministry. Faculty and students in Communication Studies are actively involved in research and consulting activities for community, state, regional, national, and international organizations and agencies.

The Communication Sciences and Disorders Program provides opportunities for the study of normal speech, language and hearing and the associated disorders. The courses offered in this program are pre-professional and prepare the student for further study at the graduate level. Faculty and students in Communication Sciences and Disorders provide services to the University Speech and Hearing Center and the Augmentative Communication Systems Laboratory, and engage in cooperative work with area schools, hospitals and other human service agencies. In addition, the faculty and students in Communication Sciences and Disorders are actively involved in research.

The Education of Deaf Children Program provides opportunities for study in two concentrations: Teacher Preparation and Educational Interpreting. Both areas of study focus on the unique educational needs of deaf and hard-of-hearing children emphasizing language acquisition, teaching methods and communication modes. Specialized training in communication modes is offered through sign classes and the Sign Language Laboratory. Supervised experiences are available for student observations, volunteer work and practicum in area public schools and the Central North Carolina School for the Deaf.

Criterion for Progression in the Major

Only grades of "C-" or better taken in Communication courses will count toward completion of a major in the Department.

 

Communication Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)

Required: 122 semester hours

The Bachelor of Arts major in Communication Studies consists of:

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER), 54-55 hours required

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements (42 hours)

33 hours to include:

  • CST 105 or 111 or 341, 200, 205, 207, 210, 211, 299, 350, 399, 460 and 499
  • 9 additional hours of CST electives at the 200 level or above

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for degree.

 

Communication Studies Minor

Required: 18 semester hours

A minor in Communication Studies consists of CST 200, and at least 15 semester hours of additional courses in the Communication Studies Program.

 

Speech Pathology and Audiology Major (Bachelor of Science)

Required: 122 semester hours

The Speech Pathology and Audiology Major, offered by the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program, provides a preprofessional program for those preparing for graduate study in speech-language pathology and audiology. The major is designed to satisfy some requirements for the N.C. license in Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology, although no license is awarded until completion of the Master's degree. Instruction is designed to meet American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards.

Transfer students may require an additional semester to complete the undergraduate degree program.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours required)

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

1. Admission Requirements

  • Students must be formally admitted to the Speech Pathology and Audiology Major. Only students with a written acceptance will be permitted to enroll in required courses at the 300 level or above.
  • Applicants for admission to the Speech Pathology and Audiology major may apply only after completion and/or transfer of 55 semester hours and must apply before enrollment in any required courses at or above the 300 level in the major. Applicants must have an overall grade point average of at least 2.7 to be admitted to the major.
  • The grade point average (see b. above) is a minimum requirement and simple compliance does not automatically imply admission. In all cases, admission is competitive and limited by space available in the program.
  • Students seeking admission to the Speech Pathology and Audiology Major should proceed as follows:
    (1) Secure an official transcript(s) of undergraduate coursework completed at colleges and universities other than UNCG;
    (2) Secure an application from the Communication Science and Disorders Program Office at 300 Ferguson Building;
    (3) Deliver both the transcripts and the completed application to the Program Office in 300 Ferguson Building.
    (4) In some cases the Program may require additional information or an interview, so the application process should be initiated immediately after completion of 55 semester hours.

2. Criteria for Continuing in the Speech Pathology and Audiology Major

  • Maintenance of a minimum overall grade point average of 2.7;
  • Minimum grade point average of 2.7 in CSD 306, 307, 308, and 309, with no grades in these courses below C-;
  • No grades below C- in any course in the major;
  • Demonstration of high quality oral and written communication;
  • Compliance with all University regulations including the Academic Honor Code.

3. Major Requirements

Minimum 24 semester hours above the 100-level.

  • All majors are required to take CSD 306, 307, 308, 309, 334, 336, 337 and 556; EDC 135; PSY 121
  • Students preparing for graduate study in speech-language pathology are required to take CSD 338, 339 and 451.
  • Students preparing for graduate study in audiology are required to take PHY 205-205L and MAT 119, 120.
  • All undergraduate majors must complete 25 supervised observation hours in the University Speech and Hearing Center.

 

Education of the Deaf Major (Bachelor of Science)

Required:

Teacher Preparation concentration, 128 semester hours

Educational Interpreter concentration, 129 semester hours

See "Teacher Education," Part 7 for Teacher Education admission requirements and second major requirement.

 

Teacher Preparation Concentration

The Teacher Preparation concentration provides training at the undergraduate level for teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing children. In addition to courses in the major area, students elect a specialization such as preschool education, elementary education, or secondary education (mathematics, history, English, etc.). Internships for teaching take place at the Central North Carolina School for the Deaf and in area public school programs with students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Upon completion of the program, students are eligible for licensure by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (K-12 Hearing Impaired) and the Council on Education of the Deaf.

Transfer students may require additional semesters to complete the undergraduate degree program.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (39 semester hours required)

  1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (CAE), 3 sh
  2. British or American Literature (CBL) or World Literature (CWL), 3 sh
  3. Fine Arts (CFA), 3 sh
  4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (CHP), 6 sh
  5. Mathematics (CMT), 3 sh
  6. Natural Science (CNS), 6 sh
    Required: one course in Physical Science (CPS)
    and one course in Life Science (CLS); no lab is required
  7. Non-Western Studies (CNW), 3 sh
  8. Reasoning and Discourse (CRD), 6 sh
  9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSB), 6 sh
    Required: PSY 121 and one other SB course
  10. Writing-Intensive Requirement (see Writing Intensive requirements)

The above reflects waivers approved for this program in the areas of: Literature (CBL or CWL), 3 hours; Natural Science (CNS), 3 hours (no lab required); Social and Behavioral Science (CSB), 3 hours; Foreign Language (CFL), 6 hours.

See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Note: Where appropriate, teacher licensure requirements (listed below) may be selected to fulfill liberal education requirements.

Major Requirements

Minimum 24 semester hours in the major above the 100-level:

EDC 135, 240, 243, 335, 461, 483, 485, 577, 578; CSD 334; Completion of Sign Assessment I

Related Area Requirements

  1. PSY 121
  2. HDF 302 or PSY 250
  3. SOC 211 or approved substitute
  4. ELC 381
  5. PSY 502, or CUI 540, or approved substitute

Specialization

21 semester hours in elementary education, preschool education, secondary education, or in another sequence approved by the Department of Communication:

Preschool Specialization

Required:

HDF 452, 552, with 9 hours to be selected from: CSC 101, CUI 346 or LIS 346, HDF 212, 522, 532, 542, LIS 556

Elementary Specialization

Required:

ART 367; CUI 346 or LIS 346, with 9 hours to be selected from: CSC 101, CUI 320 or 521, 360 or 520, 370 or 519, 380 or 518, LIS 556, 582

Secondary Specialization

The Secondary Specialization is met by the second major requirement (see below).

Teacher Licensure Requirements

  1. AULER requirements as identified within each major.
  2. PSY 121
  3. ELC 381
  4. CUI 430 or 450
  5. CUI 420 or 470 (secondary) or 517
  6. HEA 201
  7. EDC 461
  8. Completion of pre-student-teaching field experience
  9. Students must have a 2.7 overall grade point average to be admitted to teacher education, and a 2.7 grade point average in all courses with a EDC prefix in order to be admitted to student teaching. Any grade below C- in a required core course makes a student ineligible to continue in the licensure track.

Second Major Requirement

All students majoring in Teacher Preparation Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children who select the preschool or elementary specialization are required to complete another approved major or a second major or a concentration consisting of a minimum of 24 semester hours in a basic academic discipline. Depending on the academic discipline selected, a maximum of 6 hours may be counted toward both the All-University Liberal Education Requirements.

The following majors have been approved for Education of the Deaf: Art, English, Linguistics, Mathematics, Psychology, and Sociology. Other second majors require program approval.

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete the 128 semester hours required for degree.

 

Educational Interpreter Concentration

The Educational Interpreter Concentration provides training at the undergraduate level for individuals to work with students who are deaf and hard-of-hearing in public school settings. Internships for interpreting occur in area public schools having programs for students who are deaf and hard-of-hearing.

Transfer students may require additional semesters to complete the undergraduate degree program.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (48 semester hours required)

  1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (CAE), 3 sh
  2. British or American Literature (CBL), 3 sh
  3. Fine Arts (CFA),3 sh
  4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (CHP), 6 sh
  5. Mathematics (CMT), 3 sh
  6. Natural Science (CNS), 6 sh
    Required: one course in Physical Science (CPS)
    and one course in Life Science (CLS); no lab is required
  7. Non-Western Studies (CNW), 3 sh
  8. Reasoning and Discourse (CRD), 6 sh
  9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSB), 9 sh
  10. World Literature (CWL), 3 sh
  11. Writing-Intensive Requirement (see Writing Intensive requirements)

The above reflects waivers approved for this program in the areas of: Natural Science (CNS), 3 hours (no lab required); and Foreign Language (CFL), 6 hours.

See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

A minimum of 45 semester hours above the 100-level to include:

EDC 135, 240, 243, 335, 462, 463, 483, 486, 487, 488, 555, 557, 558, 572, 578; CSD 334; Completion of Sign Assessment I and Interpreting Assessment I

Cognate Requirements

30 semester hours to consist of:

BCT 250; CED 310; CST 105, 207; CUI 202, 540, 543; ELC 381; ENG 260 or CUI 526; PSY 121

Six semester hours selected from the following:

ATY 385 or 387; CSC 101; CUI 555 or 450; LIS 346, 554 or 556; PSY 341

 

Communication Studies Courses (CST)

Courses For Undergraduates

105 Introduction to Communication Studies (3:3).

Introduction to the principles and skills for effective communication in the contexts of public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group/team communication. Videotaping used to enhance personal growth. [RD, CRD] (FA,SP,SU)

111 Argumentation and Debate (3:3).

Analysis of issues and arguments of current public interest; training in the presentation of reasoned, persuasive oral discourse. [RD, CRD] (Formerly CST 231)

114 The Narrative Self (3:3).

Theory and practice of voice and diction improvement with special emphasis on the telling of one's life story. (B/C Production Course) (FA,SP,SU) (Formerly CST 112)

200 Communication and Society (3:3).

Introduction to the study of human communication, emphasizing uses of communication to build relationships and communities. Application of theories of communication to interpersonal, organizational, communal, political, and mass contexts. [SB, CSB] (FA,SP,SU) (Formerly CST 106)

205 Persuasion in Western Culture (3:3).

Significant theories in persuasive communication from classical times to the present. Types of societies in which oratory flourishes. Critical analysis of selected speakers. Contemporary issues, including the ethics of persuasion. [HP, CHP-CMO].

207 Relational Communication (3:3).

Contemporary theory and practice of relational communication, with emphasis on increasing awareness of strategic and ethical uses of communication to build relationships.

210 Communication Ethics (3:3).

Provides students with an opportunity to think critically about ethical and moral dimensions of current practices in interpersonal, institutional, and public communication. (FA,SP)

211 Strategic Communication (3:3).

An introduction to the skillful, purposeful, and self-aware management of communication choices in personal relationships, teams, organizations, communal, and mass mediated forms of human communication. (SP)

299 Communication Theory (3:3). Pr. 200.

Critical analysis and evaluation of scientific, rhetorical, and critical theories of communication. Emphasis on how theory assists us to understand, predict, and transform society. (FA,SP) (Formerly CST 420)

308 Strategies in Organizational Communication (3:3).

Survey of organizational communication and public relations theories, practices, and functions, as strategic communication that enable organizations to function both ethically and effectively, to achieve goals within communities. (FA,SP) (Formerly CST 208 and 514)

309 Political Communication (3:3).

Study of the development, maintenance, and deterioration of political communities. Emphasis on conflicting needs, symbols, reasons and preferences in speeches, campaign activities, and the mass media. (Formerly CST 209)

341 Business and Professional Communication (3:3).

Foundation for achieving goals through communication in business and professional settings. Emphasis on oral competency within variety of contexts: public, interpersonal, interviewing, teams. Videotaping used for presentation improvement. [RD, CRD] (FA,SP,SU)

342 Communication and Public Relations (3:3). Pr. 308.

Public relations and its function within society and the organization. Theoretical base and practical approaches to communicating with target publics.

344 Negotiation and Conflict Management (3:3).

Role and functions of negotiation in conflict management.

350 Small Group and Team Communication (3:3).

Theory and practice of small group/team communication, emphasizing student participation. Develops skills for leadership in small group/teams. Develops framework for analysis of effective small groups/teams. (FA,SP,SU) (Formerly CST 530)

399 Communication Research Methods (3:3). Pr. 200, 205, 207, 210, 299.

Theoretical examination and practical application of the philosophical, ideological, and processual bases for selecting, using, and evaluating methods of conducting and reporting communication research. (FA)

412 Communication Internship (1 to 6). Pr. 308, senior status, and permission of instructor.

  • Open to majors only.
  • May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours credit.

Field learning experience using public relations and/or organizational communication strategies in agencies and organizations within the larger community.

460 Cases in Applied Communication (3:3). Pr. permission of instructor

Seminar in applying communication theory and research to actual situations through published cases. (Formerly CST 560)

493 Honors Work (3-6). See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.

499 Senior Project Seminar (3:3). Pr. 399, senior status, and permission of instructor.

"Capstone experience" for majors. Course explores the themes of strategies, ethics, relationships, and communities, in their academic experience. Course also serves as a method of assessment for majors. (FA,SP)

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students.

502 Semantics and Semiotics (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Language, meaning, and sign systems as communication process. Emphasis on projects to apply theoretical concepts from general semantics and semiotics to promote understanding of how humans symbolically construct reality. (SU)

505 Speechwriting (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Composition and delivery of advanced informative and persuasive speeches. Methods of speech writing; special attention to manuscript delivery.

532 Communication and Social Change (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Examination of the influences of freedom of expression, persuasion, strategic protest rhetoric, repression, and social control in the evolution of communities. Topics and emphases vary by semester. (FA)

559 Gender and Communication Theory (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Examination of gender and issues of theory construction in rhetoric and communication science. In-depth analysis of gender in relation to persuasive, linguistic, nonverbal, and interpersonal communication.

561 Advanced Public Relations (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Advanced instruction in the preparation of public relations tools and classroom examination of public relations case studies.

562 Organizational Change (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Instruction in communicating changes into existing organizations. Methods of creating a climate for change, diffusing new ideas and technologies, and assessing change consequences.

563 Presidential Communication (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Examination of strategic and ethical dimensions of presidential information-gathering, reality-testing, relations with mass media, and public persuasion through analysis of significant decisions and addresses.

599 Instructional Communication (3:3). Pr. 399 or graduate status or permission of instructor.

Seminar for teaching communication. Designed for graduate teaching assistants, graduates and undergraduates interested in communication training. Pedagogical principles, collaborative problem-solving, micro-teaching with feedback and guidance in preparation of instructional materials. (FA)

 

Communication Sciences and Disorders Courses (CSD)

Courses For Undergraduates

219 Communication Disorders Laboratory (1:0:2). Pr. permission of instructor.

  • May be repeated for credit.
  • Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP).

Supervised therapy for students with speech, voice, language, or hearing problems.

250 Concepts in Communication Sciences (3:3).

  • For freshmen and sophomores.

Concepts essential in understanding human communication; factors affecting life-long development and competency of speech, language and hearing. (FA)

306 Introduction to Phonetics (3:3). Pr. for Majors only or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with CSD 307, 308, and 309.

  • Not open to freshmen or sophomores.

Recording of speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet in broad transcription. General American dialects and variations.

307 Speech and Hearing Science (3:3). Pr. for Majors only or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with CSD 306, 308, and 309.

  • Not open to freshmen or sophomores.

Acoustic principles of speech and hearing; analysis of the acoustic characteristics of speech and physiological correlates; speech perception.

308 Language and Speech Development (3:3). Pr. for Majors only or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with CSD 306, 307, and 309.

  • Not open to freshmen or sophomores.
  • Students cannot receive credit for both this course and EDC 240.

Theory and evidence of the chronological development of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in the child.

309 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (3:3). Pr. for Majors only or by permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrently with CSD 306, 307, and 308.

  • Not open to freshmen or sophomores.

Anatomical and physiological bases of human communication.

334 Introduction to Audiology (3:3). Pr./Cor. CSD 308 and either EDC 243 or CSD 307; or permission of instructor.

Basic anatomy and physiology of the auditory system, fundamental hearing science, and methods and techniques of hearing measurement and interpretation for the assessment, diagnosis, evaluation, and rehabilitation of hearing disorders.

336 Articulation Disorders (3:3). Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309.

Analysis of defective articulation-resonance as related to faulty development and to orofacial, neurologic, and sensory disabilities. Techniques for remediation.

337 Language Disorders (3:3). Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309.

Nature, theory, measurement, and management of language problems in children and adults. Emphasis on problems in children.

338 Voice Disorders (3:3). Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309.

Factors related to voice disorders in children and adults. Procedures for the examination of voice. Remediation techniques.

339 Rhythm Disorders (3:3). Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309.

Basic theories and principles in the onset, development, and maintenance of stuttering and similar disorders. Principal factors in measurement, diagnosis, and treatment.

451 Diagnostic Procedures: Inquiry, Observation and Measurement (3:2:3). Pr. completion of all CSD 300-level courses required for the major or permission of the instructor.

Processes and techniques of data acquisition and analysis for the diagnosis, assessment, and evaluation of communication disorders.

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

551 Speech and Language Disorders: Diagnostic Procedures (3:2:2). Pr. permission of instructor.

Differential diagnosis of speech, language, voice, and rhythm problems.

552 Communication and Aging (3:3). Pr. CSD 308 or consent of instructor.

Development of communication in old age; factors affecting development and competency; communication evidence and theories of aging; facilitation of life-long functional communication.

554 Advanced Speech Science (3:3). Pr. CSD 306, 307, 308, 309.

Acoustic theory and methods of analysis; acoustic structure of speech and its physiological correlates; application of acoustic information to clinical management of disorders of communication.

556 Aural Rehabilitation (3:3). Pr. CSD 334 or 570 or permission of instructor.

Principles and methods of aural rehabilitation with the hearing impaired and deaf. Hearing aid; cochlear implants; speech reading; education techniques; and auditory training.

568 Psychoacoustics (3:3). Pr. permission of instructor.

Principles underlying perception of pitch, loudness, and various other auditory phenomena. Focus on speech intelligibility and the relationships between acoustic elements and elicited responses.

570 Diagnostic Audiology I (3:2:2). Pr. CSD 334 or permission of instructor.

Basic diagnostic procedures in audiology. Includes anatomy, physiology, and disorders of the hearing mechanism, basic evaluation and interpretation of auditory function.

571 Beginning Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (1 to 3). Pr. admission to the appropriate degree program or permission of instructor.

  • Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory, S/U.

Beginning clinical practice in diagnosis of and therapy for communication disorders.

573 Advanced Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology (1 to 3). Pr. admission to the appropriate degree program and CSD 571 or permission of instructor. · May be repeated for credit.

Advanced clinical practice in diagnosis of and therapy for communication disorders.

574 Diagnostic Audiology II (3:2:2). Pr. CSD 570 or equivalent.

Non-organic hearing loss; differential diagnosis; special problems in diagnosis.

575 Instrumentation for Communication Disorders (3:3). Pr. permission of instructor.

Instrumentation commonly used in communication disorders; operation and measurement techniques for clinical and research applications.

576 Clinical Practice in Audiology (1 to 3). Pr. CSD 570 or permission of instructor.

Supervised clinical practice in evaluation of hearing and management of hearing impairment.

 

Education of Deaf Children Courses (EDC)

Courses For Undergraduates

135 Sign Language for the Deaf I (3:3).

American Sign Language and finger spelling with emphasis on the development of basic receptive and expressive skills. (FA,SP,SU)

240 Communication Development in Children (3:3).

  • Students cannot receive credit for both this course and CSD 308.

Psychosociolinguistic and developmental processes in the acquisition of communication in typically developing children. Emphasis on interpersonal communication patterns in diverse cultures that contribute to and influence social interaction. [SB, CSB] (FA,SU)

243 History and Psychology of the Deaf (3:3).

Traditional and experimental methods of educating deaf children. Review of psychological studies of deafness and implications for education. (FA)

333 Special Problems (1 to 3). Pr. permission of faculty supervisor is required prior to registration.

  • May be repeated for credit.

Guided individual study in an area of special interest to the student.

335 Sign Language for the Deaf II (3:3). Pr. 135 or permission of instructor.

Development of conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL). Review of origin and application of contemporary manual communication systems. (FA,SP)

455 Rural Education I: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3:3). Pr. permission of instructor.

Study and description of rural communities and social problems within communities. Emphasis on change and diversity and how unique responses to needs of deaf and hard-of-hearing children are warranted. (FA)

456 Rural Education II: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3:3). Pr. 455 and permission of instructor.

Methods of working collaboratively with other school professionals to serve deaf and hard-of-hearing children in rural public schools. Emphasis on interpersonal working relationships and development of co-teaching strategies. (SP)

457 Rural Education III: Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (3:3). Pr. 455, 456 and permission of instructor.

Specialized in-service training techniques and knowledge about deaf and hard-of-hearing children. Module development for staff, parents, and children in rural public schools. (FA)

461 Internship in Teaching the Deaf (12:1:15).

Full-time supervised classroom teaching in one or more classes for the deaf in an acceptable school environment. (FA,SP)

462 Educational Interpreting I (3:3). Pr. 335 or permission of instructor.

Basic principles and strategies of interpreting/transliterating for mainstreamed students who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. (FA)

463 Educational Interpreting II (3:3). Pr. 462 or permission of instructor.

A continuation of Educational Interpreting I with emphasis on technical and specialized terminology. Includes basic introduction of Cued Speech transliterating, oral interpreting, and interpreting for deaf-blind students. (SP)

483 Teaching Academic Subjects to the Deaf - Primary (3:3:3).

Methods in teaching academic materials to deaf children with emphasis on elementary level. Utilization of manual and aural skills of deaf students in the classroom. (FA)

485 Teaching Academic Subjects to the Deaf - Secondary (3:3:3).

Methods of teaching academic materials to deaf children at the secondary level. Importance of using residual hearing as a method of transmission. (FA)

486 Educational Interpreting: Seminar and Practicum (6:3:4). Pr. 463.

Field experiences in mainstream programs at elementary, middle school, and high school levels. Observation, note taking, and participating as interpreter for selected activities. Discussions of field experiences, assignments, projects, and job-related issues. (FA,SP)

487 Educational Interpreting Internship (12). Pr. 486; completion of Interpreting Assessment I.

Two consecutive full-time interpreting or transliterating assignments in public school mainstream programs under the direction of the cooperating interpreter/transliterator and the University supervisor. (FA,SP)

488 Interpreting: Sign-to-Voice (3:3).

Development of receptive sign language techniques and voicing skills involved in interpreting or transliterating a signed message into spoken English. (SP)

493 Honors Work (3-6). See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.

 

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

555 Sign Language III (3:3). Pr. 335 or permission of instructor.

Advanced manual communication with emphasis on interpreting and translating for deaf adults in specialized settings. (FA)

557 Interpreting: English to ASL I (3:3). Pr. 555 or permission of instructor.

Analysis of the linguistic principles of American Sign Language and its role in the education of deaf and hard-of-hearing children and in the Deaf community. (SP)

558 Interpreting: English to ASL II (3:3). Pr. 557.

Further study of American Sign Language with emphasis on the use of linguistic principles to interpret concepts presented in English. (FA)

572 Issues in Educational Interpreting (3:3).

A study of the state and national code of ethics for interpreters/transliterators. Educational, cultural, legislative, and professional issues are addressed as they relate to the field of educational interpreting. (FA)

577 Teaching Speech to the Deaf (3:3).

Principles and techniques for developing and maintaining speech in the hearing-impaired of all ages. (SP)

578 Teaching Language to the Deaf (3:3). Pr. CSD 308 or equivalent.

Systems for developing language in the individual with severe hearing impairment. (FA)

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level CST, CSD, and EDC courses.

 

 

 
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