header_nav Search UNCG UNCG Index Contact UNCG Events Calendar Campus Directory URO Home UNCG Home URO Home

Return to 1998-1999 UGB Index
Department of Art
162 McIver Building

Art Major (BFA) with concentrations in Design, Painting, SculptureArt Major (BFA) with concentrations in Art Education I and Art Education IIArt Major (BA) with concentrations in Art History, Museum Studies, Studio ArtArt as a Second MajorArt MinorStudio Art CoursesArt History CoursesArt Education CoursesMuseum Studies Courses

 
Porter Aichele, Associate Professor and Head of Department
 
Professors Goldstein, Lee; Associate Professors Doren, Gottsegen, Kotani, Maggio, Rice, Wasserboehr; Assistant Professors Ananian, Dimock, Dunnill, Gerhart, Lixl-Purcell, O'Leary

 

The Department of Art offers the following degree programs:

  • BFA, art major, concentrations in art education I & II, design, painting, and sculpture
  • BA, art major, concentrations in art history, museum studies, and studio art
  • MEd, art major
  • MFA, studio art major, with or without teacher certification

The department believes that at the undergraduate level students are best served by a liberal university education with a specialization in art. Specialized degree programs emphasize the traditional disciplines of painting, sculpture, design, art history, and art education. Students seeking vocational specializations should pursue relevant post-baccalaureate studies.

Freshmen art majors are advised in CASA during the freshman year. Before the beginning of the sophomore year, students should contact Academic Advising and Support Services to request a faculty advisor in the Art Department.

All transfer students should make an appointment with the department's Director of Undergraduate Advising for a portfolio review to approve transfer credit.

Courses in drawing, painting, and sculpture in the 20's, 30's, and 50's series emphasize working from observation. Still life, landscapes, interior environments, and the human figure are the primary sources of study from which students work toward developing basic artistic/observational skills. Courses in design and the crafts in the 40's, 70's and 80 to 84 series focus on the inherent systemic logic or functional requirements of works of art.

Only those students enrolled in a degree program with a full-time load of courses may use the space, equipment, and facilities of the Art Department. Part-time students may use only the facilities directly connected with the courses in which they are enrolled.

The faculty includes artists and historians of acknowledged accomplishment in their areas of specialization. All members of the faculty teach at the undergraduate level in well-equipped facilities on the north side of McIver Building and in the Cone Art Building.

The Weatherspoon Gallery, housed in the Cone Art Building, sponsors a program of exhibitions and lectures that complement the Art Department's curriculum.

 

Art Major (Bachelor of Fine Arts)

Required: 128 semester hours, including 36 at the 300-level or above

 

Concentrations in

  • Design (including Ceramics and Photography)
  • Painting (including Drawing and Printmaking)
  • Sculpture

    The BFA program allows a more intense concentration in studio work than is available in a BA program. This concentration is gained by extending the program for the equivalent of one summer session. Because of the number of required courses, junior transfers cannot expect to complete a BFA program in two years.

     

    All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (45 hours required)

    All candidates for BFA degrees in the Art Department are required to complete the AULER requirements as listed below:

    1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE), 3 sh
    2. British or American Literature (BL), 3 sh
    3. Fine Arts (FA), 3 sh
    4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (HP), 3 sh
    5. Mathematics (MT), 3 sh
    6. Natural Science (NS), 6 sh
    7. Non-Western Studies (NW), 3 sh
    8. Reasoning and Discourse (RD), 6 sh
      Required: ENG 101 and one additional RD course
    9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB), 6 sh
    10. World Literature (WL), 3 sh
    11. AULER Electives, 6 sh

    In addition, candidates for BFA degrees must complete two writing-intensive courses; these may be selected from AULER courses, including ART 100 and 101, and/or from the four upper-level art history courses required of studio majors.

    See also detailed listing of the complete AULER area requirements and courses meeting those requirements.

     

    Major Requirements

    Core studio courses for major concentrations may be closed to students who are not enrolled in a degree program full-time.

    Core Courses for all Concentrations

    1. ART 100 or 101
    2. Four art history courses above 100 level
    3. Art 120, 140, 150, 220, 221
    4. ART 498 and 499 to be taken in the senior year. All students must submit three (3) ready-to-exhibit works to the senior juried show, usually held in the spring semester.

    Design Concentration

    1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 241, 285, 347
    2. Advanced design courses from those numbered in 40's, 70's or 80's: 10 semester hours
    3. ART 498 and 499. Independent Study projects should be in graphic design, ceramics, photography, or another appropriate area of design specialization.
    4. Art or related electives: 8 semester hours

    Painting Concentration

    1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 231, 232, 335, 337
    2. Printmaking: 4 semester hours
    3. ART 498 and 499. Independent Study projects must be in painting, drawing, or printmaking.
    4. Art or related electives: 8 semester hours

    Sculpture Concentration

    1. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221, 252 or 253, 353, 355, 356
    2. Art 498 and 499. Independent Study projects must be in sculpture.
    3. Art or related electives: 8 semester hours

     

    Electives

    Electives sufficient to complete the 128 semester hours required for the degree.

     

    Art Major (Bachelor of Fine Arts)

    Required: 128 semester hours, including 36 at the 300-level or above

     

    Concentrations in

  • Art Education I
  • Art Education II

    All studio art students who seek teacher licensure in art must take a BFA under one of two concentrations: Art Education I offers academic breadth, Art Education II offers concentration in a studio discipline. Junior transfers cannot expect to complete these programs in two years.

     

    All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (45 hours required)

    All candidates for BFA degrees with a concentration in Art Education are required to complete the AULER requirements as listed below:

    1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE), 3 sh
    2. British or American Literature (BL), 3 sh
    3. Fine Arts (FA), 3 sh
    4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (HP), 3 sh
    5. Mathematics (MT), 3 sh
    6. Natural Science (NS), 6 sh
    7. Non-Western Studies (NW), 3 sh
    8. Reasoning and Discourse (RD), 6 sh
      Required: ENG 101 and one additional RD course
    9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB), 6 sh
    10. World Literature (WL), 3 sh
    11. AULER Electives 6

    In addition, candidates for BFA degrees must complete two writing-intensive courses; these may be selected from AULER courses and/or from upper-level art courses.

    See also AULER area requirements and courses meeting those requirements.

     

    Major Requirements

    Art Education I (General Art) Concentration

    1. ART 100 or 101
    2. Four additional courses in Art History above the 100 level
    3. ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221
    4. Painting, Design: 2 semester hours in each
    5. Crafts: 6 semester hours
    6. Art or related electives: 7 semester hours
    7. Art Education courses: 360 (junior year); 363, 365, 463 and 465 (senior year)
    8. Concentration in one studio area (Design, Painting or Sculpture) of 9 semester hours above the 100-level.

    Art Education II (Studio Art) Concentration

    1. Same as Art Education I, numbers 1 through 7
    2. Independent Study in ART 498 and 499 or approved substitutes: 4 semester hours
    3. Single studio specialization, including at least 4 semester hours of independent studio (ART 498 and 499 or approved substitute) in this specialty: 10 semester hours

     

    Related Area Requirements

    (See Teacher Education for full explanation.)

    1. AULER requirements as identified within each major
    2. HEA 201 Personal Health
    3. PSY 121 General Psychology
    4. ELC 381 The Institution of Education
    5. CUI 450 Psychological Foundations of Education
    6. CUI 470 Reading Education

     

    Electives

    Electives sufficient to complete the 128 semester hours required for the degree.

     

    Admission to Student Teaching:

    During the junior year students must apply for admission to the student teaching semester. Art Education methods courses 363 and 365 are prerequisites to student teaching and are taken in the fall semester of the senior year. Student Teaching 463 and 465 are taken in the spring semester.

    Student teaching admission requirements include the following:

    1. Speech screening and medical clearance
    2. Grade point average of at least 2.7
    3. Art 360, Foundations of Art Education, which includes pre-student-teaching practicum
    4. Completion of 12 semester hours following admission to teacher education
    5. Evidence of teaching readiness competencies as set and evaluated by the department.

     

    Art Major (Bachelor of Arts)

    Required: 122 semester hours, including 36 at the 300-level or above

     

    Concentrations in

  • Art History
  • Studio Art
  • Museum Studies

    The Art History Concentration is an academic, liberal arts program with emphasis on the visual rather than the verbal tradition. Students who wish to pursue a professional career in this discipline should plan to enter a PhD program after graduation. In preparation for doctoral work, they should acquire a fluent reading knowledge of two foreign languages; German and French are usually recommended.

    The Museum Studies Concentration offers specialized courses in curatorial projects and other museum functions. Students are encouraged to make use of the resources in the Weatherspoon Art Gallery.

    The Studio Concentration combines a liberal arts education with the development of studio skills.

     

    College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours)

    In addition to meeting the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER), students in BA art programs must satisfy College of Arts and Sciences (CLER) requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

     

    Major Requirements

    Minimum 33 semester hours in art, depending on concentration

    Art History Concentration

    1. ART 100 or 101, 201, 202, 203, 204
    2. Studio Art: 6 semester hours
    3. Art History above the 200 level: 12-24 semester hours.

    Museum Studies Concentration

    1. ART 100 or 101, 201 or 202, 203 and 204
    2. Two courses from ART 120, 140, 150
    3. 15 additional semester hours of Art History, Studio Art, or approved related electives above the 100 level
    4. ART 590 (taken in the junior year)
    5. ART 400
    6. ART 401 or ART 393 or HIS 545a or b

    Studio Art Concentration

    1. ART 100 or 101
    2. Two courses from ART 120, 140, 150
    3. Art History above the 100 level: 12 semester hours
    4. Studio Art above the 100 level: 12-24 semester hours
    5. Enrollment in independent study courses (optional for qualified students)

     

    Related Area Requirements

    No specific courses required.

     

    Electives

    Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for the degree.

     

    Art As A Second Major

    Students who wish to declare a second major in art must complete all requirements listed above under the degree (BFA or BA) and concentration selected.

     

    Art Minor

    An Art Minor requires 15-19 semester hours of studio and/or art history courses. A Minor in Art History requires 3 hours in ART 100 or 101 and 12 additional hours of 200-level or above art history courses. A Minor in Studio Art requires 3 hours in ART 100 or 101 and core studio courses ART 120, 140, 150, 220, 221.

     

    Art Courses (ART)

    Art courses are listed under the following headings: Studio, Art History, Art Education, and Museum Studies

    STUDIO Courses For Undergraduates

    120 Drawing and Pictorial Composition (4:2:6).

    Basic course in principles and practice of drawing in various media and principles of pictorial composition. (FA,SP)

    140 Design I (4:2:6).

    Basic course in fundamentals of design. Work in two and three dimensions. (FA,SP)

    150 Clay Modeling (4:2:6).

    General course in preparation, designing, and modeling in clay. (FA,SP)

    190 Introduction to Studio Art (3:1:4). ·

    • Not open to art majors.

    Basic course for non-art majors. Simplified studio projects in image making and system construction in two and three dimensions. Lecture on project-related masterworks each week. (FA,SP)

    220 Drawing and Pictorial Composition II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120.

    Continuation of 120. (FA,SP)

    221 Life Drawing I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 220.

    Figure drawing from the model. (FA,SP)

    226 Woodcut and Wood Engraving (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120 or 140.

    Woodblock relief techniques as a printmaking medium. (Not offered every year.)

    228 Etching I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120 or 140.

    Intaglio techniques as a printmaking medium. (FA,SP)

    229 Lithography I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120 or 140.

    Planographic techniques as a printmaking medium. (FA,SP)

    231 Techniques of Painting (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120.

    Materials and characteristic processes of major techniques. (FA)

    232 Painting I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120.

    Basic painting course.

    241 Design II with a Computer (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 140.

    Introduction to the computer as a design tool and art medium. A variety of imaging applications introduced through design studio problems and visual problem solving. (Formerly ART 342)

    252 Techniques of Sculpture (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 150.

    Tools, materials and characteristic processes of major techniques.

    253 Sculpture I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 150.

    Working from observation, students will increase their perceptual ability and skills through studio assignments. Emphasis on the comprehension of forms and structures in space.

    275 Metal Crafts I (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 140 or 150.

    Techniques required to make jewelry and small art objects from copper, brass and precious metals. Includes gem and stone setting.

    281 Ceramics I (2:1:3).

    Basic course with emphasis on handbuilt forms. (FA,SP)

    285 Photography I (3:1:6).

    • Pr. 140, 190, or permission of instructor.

    Equipment and basic techniques of photography. Students must purchase film and papers. 35 MM camera required. (FA,SP)

    287 Photographic Perception (2:1:3).

    • Pr. access to a Polaroid camera.

    Designed to enhance visual awareness. Photographic vision, perception and language investigated. Lecture-discussion; problem solving through field and studio exercises with frequent critiques. Photographer and sitter roles explored through feedback.

    320 Drawing Exploration (2:1:3).

    • Not open to students who have previously earned credit for Art 120.

    Introduction to descriptive and expressive drawing for the general student with no previous training in art.

    321 Life Drawing II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 221.
    • May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor and department head.

    Continuation of 221. (FA,SP)

    323 The Arts as Human Experience (3:3).

    An examination of the meaning of the arts experience, including its historical and personal significance. Includes reading and related work in art, dance, drama and music. (Same as COM 323, DCE 323, MUS 323.) [FA, CFA].

    335 Painting II (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 232.

    Studio course with substantial work from the model. Emphasis on development of control of the medium for pictorial purposes.

    337 Painting III (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 335.

    Studio course with work from the model and other subject matter; emphasis on control of pictorial elements and individual development.

    340 Design III (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 140 and 241.

    Advanced study of design fundamentals with emphasis on advanced execution and content. (FA,SP) (Formerly ART 240)

    341 Letters, Signs and Symbols (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 140 and 241.

    Letter forms, signs and symbols as configurations for design study. (Formerly ART 242)

    343 Techniques of Structures (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 340.

    Theory and craftsmanship of small structures. Emphasis on aesthetic and mechanical characteristics of common materials.

    345 Three-Dimensional Design (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 10 s.h. of studio art including 140.

    Development of three-dimensional systems as objects and as environments.

    346 Kinetic Design (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 10 s.h. hours of studio art including 140.

    Motion and time sequence in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design.

    347 Color Theory (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 140.

    Major color theories and systems. Projects using properties of color in pigments, transparencies and projected light. (FA,SP)

    348 Metal Sculpture (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 252 or 253.

    Studio course in non-cast metal sculpture techniques and concepts. Basic welding and fabrication of metal as a sculpture medium.

    353 Metal Casting (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 252 or 253 or permission of instructor.

    Basic course in casting metal as a sculpture medium. Theory and practice of moldmaking and foundry processes.

    355 Sculpture II (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 252 or 253.

    The study of the human form with emphasis on the demonstration of a sound understanding of the articulation of the figure in space.

    356 Sculpture III (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 355.

    Sculpture as a plastic idiom in creating forms in space. Emphasis on the development of individual expression.

    373 Design Methods for the Crafts (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 100 or 101, 140, or consent of instructor.

    Sources of and approaches to crafts design with materials such as wood, fiber, metal and paper. Exploration of sources of design in natural and man-made worlds. Recommended for Art Education majors.

    375 Metal Crafts II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 275.

    Advanced work in techniques required to make jewelry and small art objects from copper, brass, precious metals.

    381 Ceramics II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 281 or consent of instructor.

    Wheel-thrown forms; glazing and decorating techniques. (FA,SP)

    382 Ceramic Glaze Techniques (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 281.

    Glaze formulae; mixing and testing of glazes, glaze application, the care and operation of equipment. (SP)

    384 Experimental Course: Photojournalism (3:1:2).

    • Pr. 285 or permission of instructor.

    Study of aspects of photojournalism, dealing with photographs which answer questions of who, what, when, why, where and how, and which convey important information about the human condition. (Offered FA 97)

    385 Photography II (3:1:6).

    • Pr. 285 or portfolio and permission of instructor.

    Special techniques including those used in research laboratories; work with special types of film. Students must purchase films and papers.

    387 Color Photography (3:3).

    • Pr. 285.

    An introduction to the basic processes used to produce color photographs and to an understanding of color photography as art.

    428 Etching II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 228.
    • May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor or department head.

    Continuation of 228. (FA,SP)

    429 Lithography II (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 229.
    • May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor or department head.

    Continuation of 229.

    439 Painting: Selected Media (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 120, 220.

    Special techniques and pictorial problems of various paint media.

    440 Books and Images (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 140 and 241.
    • For advanced students

    Advanced studio investigation into the relationships between images and book forms, traditional and contemporary, electronic and printed, static and dynamic. (Alt years)

    442 Experimental Course: Image Sequencing/Sequential images (3:1:6).

    • Pr. 342

    Structured studio workshops will utilize traditional and electronic media to explore image sequencing and sequential images. Primary medium will be the computer. (Offered SP 97)

    446 Graphic Design (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 140 and 241.
    • For advanced students.

    An advanced investigation into two dimensional design. Computer and traditional media incorporated to address advanced studio problems and techniques. (Alt years)

    481 Ceramics III (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 281, 381.

    Advanced course in ceramics with emphasis on the entire ceramic process: preparation of clay body and glazes, forming, bisque and glaze firing. (FA)

    493 Honors Work (3-6).

    • See prerequisites under Honors Program.

    496 Special Problems, Studio (2).

    • Pr. prior approval of supervising instructor required.
    • May be repeated for credit with consent of department head.

    Independent studio work adjusted to needs and interests of individual student. (FA,SP)

    498, 499 Independent Study (2), (2).

    • Pr. senior status and permission of instructor.

    Students complete work demonstrating technical accomplishment and self-motivation. 498: sessions on portfolio presentation and preparation. 499: sequence of work for required juried senior show. (FA,SP)

     

    STUDIO Courses For Advanced Undergraduates
    and Graduate Students

    520 Anatomy for the Artist (3:2:2).

    • Pr. 150 or permission of instructor.

    Visual analysis of the human form with an emphasis on the skeleto-muscular system.

    525 Advanced Metal Casting (4:2:6).

    • Pr. 353 or permission of instructor.

    Advanced theory and practice of metal casting.

    531 Painting (4:1:8).

    • Pr. senior or graduate standing.
    • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

    Theories, methods and techniques characteristic of recent trends in painting.

    535 Variable Topics in Painting (4:2:6).

    • Pr. advanced undergraduate or graduate standing.
    • May be repeated when topic varies.

    Practice and study of traditional and contemporary methods of painting in a variety of media and genres.

    589 Experimental Course: The Multi-Media Print (2:1:3).

    • Pr. 226, 228, or 229.

    Exploration of traditional and experimental forms of image making in printmaking, including electronic media, photography, monoprints, transfer processes, calligraphy, 3-D constructions, lithography, serigraphy, etching and woodcut. (Offered SP & FA 97)

     

    ART HISTORY Courses For Undergraduates

    100 Introduction to Art (3:3).

    Intensive study of selected works of art with an emphasis on formal analysis and the relationship between art and culture. [FA, CFA]. (FA,SP)

    101 Survey of Western Art (3:3).

    Major artists and periods starting with the ancient world through current times. [FA, CFA]. (FA,SP)

    200 History of Western Architecture (3:3).

    Architecture in Europe and the U.S.A. from ancient Greece to the present.

    201 Ancient Art (3:3).

    Art and architecture of Egypt, Greece and Rome until 337 A.D.

    202 Medieval Art (3:3).

    Art and architecture of Europe from Early Christian times through the late Gothic period ca. 1400 A.D.

    203 Renaissance through Rococo (3:3).

    Visual arts of Europe during the Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque and Rococo periods. (FA)

    204 Modern Art (3:3).

    Visual arts in the West from ca. 1790 to the present. (SP)

    300 Greek Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 201.

    Architecture, sculpture, and vase painting from ca. 1000 B.C. to the end of the Hellenistic period.

    301 Early Medieval Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 202.

    Early medieval art in Western Europe from ca. 500 to 1066 A.D. including Hiberno-Saxon (Celtic), Carolingian, Ottonian and Anglo-Saxon works.

    302 Romanesque Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 202.

    Romanesque Art throughout Europe from ca. 1050 to ca. 1180 A.D.: architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination and mural painting.

    303 Gothic Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 202.

    Art in Europe from ca. 1160 to ca. 1400: architecture, sculpture, manuscript illumination and mural painting.

    304 Italian Renaissance Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 203 or consent of instructor.

    Art in Italy from ca. 1300 to ca. 1600; painting, sculpture, architecture. (FA)

    • 305 Northern Renaissance Art (3:3).
    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 203.

    Art in Europe north of the Alps from ca. 1400 to ca. 1560. Painting and graphic arts emphasized.

    306 Baroque Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 203 or consent of instructor.

    Seventeenth-century art in Europe: painting, sculpture, architecture and landscape architecture. (SP)

    307 European Art in the Eighteenth Century (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 203 or consent of instructor.

    A survey of European art media, practice, theory, and issues surrounding patronage during the century.

    308 European Art in the Nineteenth Century (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 204 or consent of instructor.

    Painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1800 to 1900.

    309 Architecture in the Twentieth Century (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 or 200.

    The components of style, theory, structure and material as embodied in the architecture of the century.

    310 American Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101.

    Historical development of art in the United States including the colonial period. Painting and architecture emphasized.

    311 Early Twentieth-Century Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 204 or consent of instructor.

    Painting, sculpture, architecture and other media from 1900 to World War II.

    312 Late Twentieth-Century Art (3:3).

    • Pr. 100 or 101 and 204 or consent of instructor.

    Traditional and new media in the last half of the century.

    400 Special Problems, Art History and Criticism (3:3).

    • Pr. 15 semester hours of art history and criticism and approval of instructor.
    • May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

    Directed program of reading and research.

    418 History of Photography (3:3).

    • Pr. Art 100 or 101 or permission of the instructor.

    A lecture course in the exploration of the photographic image, how it was produced, how it has evolved and the work of the photographers who make it an art.

    493 Honors Work (3-6).

    • See prerequisites under Honors Program.

     

    ART HISTORY Courses For Advanced Undergraduates
    and Graduate Students

    500 Traditions of Art Criticism (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing or graduate status.

    A study of the major critical traditions from the Italian Renaissance to the present, aiming to define the role of criticism in the production and reception of works of art.

    501 Topics in the History of Art (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing or graduate status.
    • May be repeated when topic varies.

    Special topics in the history of art, ancient to modern.

     

    ART EDUCATION Courses For Undergraduates

    360 Foundations of Art Education (3:2:1).

    • Pr. junior standing.

    An introduction to the art theoretical and philosophical foundations for Art Education K-12. A field placement practicum in schools or other appropriate settings is included. A prerequisite for student teaching.

    363 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Elementary School (3:2:2).

    • Pr. consent of instructor, 360.
    • For art education majors only.

    Aims and philosophy of art education in elementary school. Special section for art majors only offered in the fall. (Counts as Art credit.)

    365 Curriculum and Teaching Methods in the Secondary School (3:2:2).

    • Pr. 18 semester hours of art, 360.

    Aims, philosophy and curricula of art education in the secondary school; selection, preparation and use of teaching materials. (Counts as Art credit.)

    367 Child Art and Teaching (2:1:3).

    • Pr. junior standing.
    • Not open to Art Education majors.

    An introduction to the theoretical and philosophical foundations for Art Education (K-8), including hands-on experience with school art media.

    463 Student Teaching in the Elementary School (6:1:10).

    • Pr. senior standing with 2.7 GPA or above; CUI 450, ART 363, 365.

    Supervised student teaching at the elementary school level.

    465 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (6:1:10).

    • Pr. senior standing with 2.7 GPA; CUI 450, ART 363, 365.

    Supervised student teaching at the secondary school level.

     

    ART EDUCATION Courses For Advanced Undergraduates
    and Graduate Students

    563 Trends and Teaching in Art: Special Populations (3:2:1).

    • Pr. completion of 363, student teaching, or equivalent or consent of instructor.

    Curricular and instructional principles, processes and designs applicable to special populations in various school, institutional or community settings.

    565 Issues in Art Education (3:3).

    • Pr. graduate status or consent of instructor.
    • May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

    Exploration of issues in art or education which affect the teaching of art.

     

    MUSEUM STUDIES Courses For Undergraduates

    393 Practicum in Art Careers (1).

    • Pr. sophomore standing.
    • May be repeated for credit.

    Practicum experience for art majors for developing career goals and skills.

    401 Special Problems: Museum Studies (3:3).

    • Pr. 15 hours art history/criticism and approval of instructor.
    • May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

    Directed program of reading, research or curatorial projects in the Weatherspoon Art Gallery and other museums.

     

    MUSEUM STUDIES Courses For Advanced Undergraduates
    and Graduate Students

    590 Museum Studies (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing and permission of instructor.

    A study of the diverse operations and institutional missions of art museums, including management, governance, development, collections management, education and curatorial activities.

    Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level courses.


  •  
    UNCG HOMEPAGE
    |
    REGISTRAR'S PAGE
     

    Contact: University Registrar's Office
    Registrar, UNCG, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 (336) 334-5946

    URO Home