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Department of Business Administration
366 Bryan Building 

FacultyMission StatementBusiness Administration ProgramFinance, Real Estate, and Insurance ProgramHonors in Business AdministrationBusiness Administration Major (BS)Finance, Real Estate, and Insurance Major (BS)Business Administration Courses (BUS)Finance Courses (FIN)Management Courses (MGT)Marketing Courses (MKT)Business and Marketing Education Courses (BME)

 

Benton E. Miles, Professor and Head of Department

Professors Ajami (Hayes Distinguished Professor of Business), Johnson, Jud, Lucas, Moran, Muchinsky (Bryan Distinguished Professor of Business); Associate Professors Balbirer, Brown, Buttner, Gryskiewicz, Land, McEnally, Tullar, Williamson, Wingler, Winkler; Assistant Professors Kirkman, Lowe, Rathburn; Adjunct Assistant Professor Novelli; Lecturers Arledge, Caddell, Cash, Hassell, Holderness, James, Johnson, Kaiser, McLeod, McMillian, Perry, Sowers, Yarbrough

 

Mission Statement

The Business Administration faculty recognizes that the fundamental mission of a university is the creation and dissemination of knowledge. The Business Administration faculty contribute to accomplishing their mission through three mutually supporting activities. The faculty's first priority is to impart knowledge and skills through instructional programs. The second priority is to create knowledge through basic and applied research. The third priority is to provide public service through involvement in University, professional and community activities.

The Department of Business Administration offers two majors, Business Administration and Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate, which lead to the Bachelor of Science degree.

 

Business Administration Major

The objective of the Business Administration major is to provide liberally educated students with a broad exposure to the functional areas of business and a more comprehensive understanding of one of the managerial specialities through a choice of a concentration:

Human Resources places focus on skills and knowledge needed by the professional human resources manager: job analysis, recruiting, screening, selection, training and development, performance appraisal, job evaluation, and salary administration.

Marketing is concerned with the development and pricing of products, selection of distribution channels, and promotion of products to consumers. This concentration leads to careers in sales, sales management, advertising, and retailing as well as marketing management. (Also offered as an evening program.)

Small Business focuses on special issues related to the organization and management of smaller enterprises, family-owned business and entrepreneurships.

Business Studies is most appropriate for those who want a broad business exposure without the need to concentrate specifically in one functional area.

 

Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate Major

The undergraduate finance, insurance and real estate program deals with the theory, organization, and operation of the financial system from both a market and a managerial viewpoint. Students are expected to develop analytical abilities and to present their analyses in both written and oral form.

The Department of Business Administration offers a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in finance, insurance and real estate. Undergraduate majors are offered a broad range of courses from the areas of financial management, risk and insurance, and real estate.

Graduates may take managerial positions in controllership or treasury work in non-financial businesses as well as a wide array of careers in financial services and banking. In addition, the degree may lead to positions in risk management and real estate departments of public agencies and private corporations as well as insurance and real estate companies.

At the graduate level, the department offers courses in finance , risk management, and real estate as part of the Master of Business Administration (MBA) program.

 

Honors in Business Administration

Qualifications

  • Enrollment in and successful completion of the University Honors Program
  • A declared major in one of the areas of Business Administration
  • Maintenance of at least a 3.3 overall GPA

Recognition

The designation "Honors in Area of Study" (areas of study include Business Administration or Finance) will be printed on the student's official transcript.

 

Business Administration Major (Bachelor of Science)

Required: 122 hours

 

Degree Requirements

1. Formal admission to Business Administration:

A. Successful completion of ACC 201, 202; ECO 201, 202, 250; ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191
B. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0

2. 122 semester hours

3. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be earned at UNCG

 

All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (45 hours)

All students in this program must meet AULER requirements. Specific area requirements are indicated below:

  1. 1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE), 3 sh
  2. 2. British or American Literature (BL), 3 sh
  3. 3. Fine Arts (FA), 3 sh
  4. 4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (HP), 3 sh
  5. 5. Mathematics (MT), 3 sh
    Required: MAT 120 or 191
  6. 6. Natural Science (NS), 6 sh
  7. 7. Non-Western Studies (NW), 3 sh
  8. 8. Reasoning and Discourse (RD), 6 sh
    Required: ENG 101 or FMS 103 or RCO 101, and CST 341
  9. 9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB), 6 sh
    Required: ECO 201, 202
  10. 10. World Literature (WL) , 3 sh
  11. 11. AULER Electives (EL), 6 sh

See detailed listing of the complete AULER area requirements and courses meeting those requirements.

 

Major and Related Area Requirements

1. ACC 201, 202; ECO 201, 202, 250, 300; ISM 110, 280, 360; FIN 315; MGT 309, 312, 330, 491; MKT 320

2. Students should select one of the concentrations listed below:

Human Resources

MGT 313; any three of the following: MGT 314, 315, 317, 475; ECO 370

Marketing

MKT 426, and any three of the following: BUS 550; MKT 302, 307, 418, 421, 422, 424

Small Business

MGT 301, 314, 470; MKT 403, and one of the following: MKT 306, 424; MGT 315, 375, 475

Business Studies

18 hours of approved electives; at least 12 hours must be at the 300-level or above. Up to six hours may be taken outside the Department, but within the Bryan School.

 

Continuation Requirements

Students who have been admitted to the Business Administration Major must be in good academic standing at UNCG, must maintain at least the GPA required for program admission, and must make a grade of C or better in the coursework required for their concentration.

 

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours required for the degree. At least 13 hours of the free electives must be taken in courses outside business and economics.

 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Major
(Bachelor of Science)

Required: 122 hours

 

Degree Requirements

1. Formal admission to Finance, Insurance and Real Estate:

A. Successful completion of ACC 201, 202; ECO 201, 202, 250; ISM 110; and MAT 120 or 191
B. Grade of C or better in ACC 201
C. A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0

2. 122 semester hours

3. At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the degree must be earned at UNCG

 

All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (45 hours)

All students must meet AULER requirements. Specific area requirements are indicated below:

  1. 1. Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE), 3 sh
  2. 2. British or American Literature (BL), 3 sh
  3. 3. Fine Arts (FA), 3 sh
  4. 4. Historical Perspectives on Western Culture (HP), 3 sh
  5. 5. Mathematics (MT), 3 sh
    Required: MAT 120 or 191
  6. 6. Natural Science (NS), 6 sh
  7. 7. Non-Western Studies (NW), 3 sh
  8. 8. Reasoning and Discourse (RD), 6 sh
    Required: ENG 101 or FMS 103 or RCO 101, and CST 341
  9. 9. Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB), 6 sh
    Required: ECO 201, 202
  10. 10. World Literature (WL), 3 sh
  11. 11. AULER Electives (EL), 6 sh

See detailed listing of the complete AULER area requirements and courses meeting those requirements.

 

Major and Related Area Requirements

1. FIN 315, 320, 325, 330

2. Two additional finance courses selected from: FIN 300, 410, 415, 420, 430, 442, 444, 449, 471, 472, 473, 493, 499.

3. Related Areas: ACC 201, 202; ECO 201, 202, 250, 300; ISM 110, 280, 360; MGT 309, 312, 330, 491; MKT 320

 

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours required for the degree. At least 13 hours of the free electives must be taken in courses outside business and economics.

 

Business Administration Courses (BUS)

Courses For Undergraduates

100 Global Business, Markets, and Society (3:3).

  • Open to all students.

Introductory exploration of the role of business in a free market society. Introduction to basic business terminology. Examination of current business issues facing actual companies.

105 Introduction to Business Skills Development (1:2).

Development of business skills determined by employers as critical for success. Fosters development of skills early in a student's academic career to promote success in both college and work.

220 Experimental Course: Field Experience in Business (3-6).

  • Pr. written approval of faculty.

Designed to give students an early business experience. Requirements include a minimum of 300-600 hours of employment and completion of designated educational activities. Contact will be maintained with UNCG faculty. (Offered SP98)

 

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

550 Directed Business Practice (1-4:1:3-12).

  • Pr. permission of instructor, admission to the Bryan School of Business and Economics or other professional program approved by the School.

Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. Regularly scheduled class attendance as well as reading, writing and skill practice assignments are required. (Same as BME 550)

 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate Courses (FIN)

Courses For Undergraduates

300 The Management of Personal Finance (3:3).

Personal budgeting and accounting; borrowing money; buying on credit, personal income tax returns; saving and wise investment of savings; insurance; home ownership.

315 Business Finance I (3:3).

  • Pr. admission to a program of study within The Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Recognition and analysis of financial problems. Integrated approach to financial management emphasizing basic concepts of valuation, investment, and financial structure.

320 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance (3:3).

  • Pr. grade of C or better in 315; junior standing; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Investigation of risk and the risk management process including the role of insurance. Social insurance, financial planning issues, employee benefits and pension and retirement planning are included.

325 Fundamentals of Real Estate (3:3).

  • Pr. grade of C or better in 315; junior standing; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Examination of principles, practices, and policies affecting real estate markets. Topics include the nature of real property, mortgages, real estate financing, and real property law.

330 Financial Institutions and Markets (3:3).

  • Pr. grade of C or better in 315; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Principal institutions and markets comprising the financial system; their roles in short-term, long-term and equity financing, interest rate determination and capital formation. Interrelationships between domestic and international and financial markets. Government policy objectives and regulations as influences on the financial system.

410 Business Finance II (3:3).

  • Pr. grade of C or better in 315; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Theory and practical application of capital budgeting, cost of capital and capital structure analysis, working capital management, and financial analysis and planning.

415 Advanced Corporate Finance (3:3).

  • Pr. admission to a program of study within The Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School; 410.

An examination of the interrelationships between major financial policy decisions. Topics include capital structure theory, corporate debt capacity, risk and capital budgeting, dividend policy, corporate restructuring, and mergers and acquisitions.

420 Real Estate Finance (3:3).

  • Pr. grade of C or better in 315; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Working knowledge of real estate finance. Topics include mortgage markets and institutions, methods and practices of real estate finance, and real estate appraisal and investment analysis.

430 Real Estate Investment (3:3).

  • Pr. 315; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Introduction to the foundations and practices in real estate investment. The principal emphasis is on real estate investment principles and concepts, the investment environment, financial analysis and practical applications.

442 Investments (3:3).

  • Pr. 330; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Investment principles and practices, investment policies, security analysis, and the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases. Long- and short-term fluctuations of security prices, functions of securities markets and regulatory bodies, and individual investment needs.

444 International Finance (3:3).

  • Pr. 330; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Examination of international finance from standpoint of the firm. Topics include international money and capital markets, foreign exchange markets, investments in foreign operations, as well as financing strategies for foreign operations.

449 Seminar in Finance (3:3).

  • Pr. admission to program or other approved program; grade of C or better in 315.

Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a topic or group of related topics of current interest in financial theory, policy, or practice. Topics may vary each semester.

471 Life Insurance and Financial Planning (3:3).

  • Pr. 320; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Emphasis on life insurance in the financial planning process. Explores the role of savings and investment and the creation, preservation, and taxation of wealth.

472 Property and Liability Insurance (3:3).

  • Pr. 320; admission to a program of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Examination of coverages and exclusions found in direct damage and indirect loss contracts and liability insurance contracts as risk management devices for the treatment of pure risk.

473 Risk Management (3:3).

  • Pr. 320; admission to a progrm of study in the Bryan School or other professional program approved by the School.

Identification and evaluation of risk with emphasis on risk treatment. Attention given to risk financing, including cash-flow plans, self-insurance, and captive insurer alternatives.

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493 (p. 225).
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

499 Problems in Finance (3:3).

  • Pr. senior majors or others by consent of instructor; grade of C or better in 315.
  • May be repeated for credit with approval of Department Head.

Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a topic or group of related topics of current interest in theory or policy of finance. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

 

Management Courses (MGT)

Courses For Undergraduates

200 Management of Organizations (3:3).

  • Pr. sophomore standing.
  • An introduction to how managers coordinate human and material resources to achieve organizational goals. Effective management practices that can be applied to business, educational, governmental, hospital, and social service organizations.

    301 Introduction to International Business (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 312; admission to approved program.

    Introduction to the environmental factors which increasingly cause businesses to become international in the scope of their activities. Nature of global business and multinational organizations analyzed.

    309 Business Communications (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing and admission to approved program.

    Business and professional communication: job search skills; teamwork; communication technology; verbal and non-verbal strategies. Emphasizes effective persuasive, interpersonal, intercultural, and organizational strategies through business styles, formats, and presentations.

    312 Human Behavior in Business Organizations (3:3).

    Businesses as a generic class of organizations. Relation of individual worker and manager to organization and its impact upon them. Formal and informal groups. Management from behavioral point of view. Stability and change within business organizations.

    313 Human Resource Management (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 312.

    An analysis of how human resources contribute to organizational performance, and the management of those human resources including recruitment, selection, compensation, training and development, performance, appraisal, and union/management relations.

    314 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3:3).

    • Pr. admission to approved program; grade of C- or better in 312.

    Introduction to industrial and organizational psychology with special emphasis on employee motivation, selection, training, and organizational determinants of employee behavior. (Same as PSY 314.)

    315 Selection and Compensation (3:3).

    • Pr. admission to program of study within the Bryan School or other approved program; grade of C- or better in 312; 314

    Selection theory and the uses of assessment devices. Principles of compensation and job evaluation. Market surveys and their effects on pay structure.

    317 Training and Development in Organizations (3:3).

    • Pr. 314; admission to approved program; grade of C- or better in MGT 312.

    Principles of training and development. Training needs, assessment, training solutions to organization problems, skill training, different training options, and ways of integrating new behavior and attitudes into the organizational system.

    330 The Legal Environment of Business (3:3).

    Survey of the legal, political, and ethical environment in which business decisions are made. Anti-trust, employment, and consumer and creditor laws included. Federal, state, and international laws covered.

    331 Legal Aspects of Business Transactions (3:3).

    • Pr. admission to BS Accounting program.

    Subjects covered include court systems, contract and sales law, professional ethics, business political activities, anti-trust laws, international laws, and other matters of public policy.

    332 Legal Aspects of Management (3:3).

    • Pr. 330 or 331; admission to approved program, or permission of instructor.

    Securities regulations, negotiable instruments law, and debtor and creditor rights included. Also covered are legal relationships-partnerships, corporations, and principal-agency.

    354 Women, Work, and Management (3:3).

    • Pr. MGT 200 or SOC 211; junior standing.

    Examination of women's participation in the the U.S. labor force and work organizations with special attention to issues for women in management. Markham. (Same as SOC 354.)

    373 Experimental Course: Managing Diversity in Organizations (3:3).

    Development of an inclusive definition of diversity and exploration of ways to manage diversity as a resource/process for new learning, for innovation, and for individual and organizational growth. (Offered SU98)

    375 Management Process Skills (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 312; admission to approved program.

    Practical application of management theory. Processes for performing the basic management functions of decision making, planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Application of the processes to management cases.

    470 Small Business Management (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 312; MKT 320, FIN 315, ISM 360; admission to approved program..

    Application of management principles to small business organizations. How to start a new enterprise. Requirements for successful operation of a small business.

    475 Employment and Human Resource Law (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing; grade of at least C- in 312 or permission of instructor; admission to approved program.

    National Labor Relations Act, Fair Labor Standards Act (including equal employment), and other statutes and court decisions relating to employment relations and their effect on managerial practices. (FA)

    491 Business Policy and Strategy (3:3).

    • Pr. 309, 312, MKT 320, FIN 315, ISM 280, 360; senior standing; admission to approved program; pr. or coreq. MGT 330 (for Accounting majors, MGT 331).

    Capstone case course in top management policy and strategy determination. Students learn to integrate various business functions and to develop skills and judgment in solving problems of the organization as a total system in relation to its environment.

    493 Honors Work (3-6).

    • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493 (p. 225).
    • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

    499 Problems in Management (3:3).

    • Pr. senior majors or others by consent of instructor.
    • May be repeated for credit with approval of department head.

    Independent study, research, and class discussion covering a topic or group of related topics of current interest in theory or policy of the business enterprise. Topics vary from semester to semester.

     

    Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

    519 Business Report Writing (3:3).

    • Pr. 309 or permission of instructor.

    Continuation of 309. Emphasis on organizing and writing realistic business reports, including research methodology which precedes report preparation.

     

    Marketing Courses (MKT)

    Courses For Undergraduates

    306 Introduction to Retailing (3:3).

    Introductory course in the fundamentals of store organization, management, and merchandising.

    307 Selling and Sales Management (3:3).

    Special problems involved in marketing with emphasis on the sales process.

    320 Principles of Marketing (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing and admission to approved program.

    General survey including marketing decision-making and models, buyer behavior, channels of distribution, and marketing research. Topics treated from a managerial viewpoint.

    321 Advanced Marketing Management (3:3).

    • Pr. ISM 110, ACC 202, ECO 250, grade of C- or better in MGT 320; admission to approved program.

    Advanced analysis and decision-making techniques in marketing, including some computer applications. Emphasis on strategic view of marketing rather than just tactical view and practical applications of marketing knowledge.

    403 Marketing for Small Firms (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 312 or 320; admission to approved program; senior standing.

    Special nature of small business and the marketing implications. Addresses general marketing issues and specific, "real world" marketing problems. Small business firms serve as clients for student consulting teams.

    408 Operating Problems in Retailing (3:3).

    • Pr. 306; junior standing; admission to approved program.

    Examination and evaluation of politics and practices in retailing, with emphasis on advertising and its economic significance.

    418 Advanced Merchandising (3:3).

    • Pr. 306, 307; junior standing; admission to approved program.

    Merchandising policies, buying, stock planning and control, and merchandise pricing in modern retail stores.

    421 Promotion Management (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 320; admission to approved program.

    Promotion process and decision criteria for making promotion management decisions. Emphasis on behavioral and communicative aspects of advertising, personal sales, and other promotional tools from a management decision-making viewpoint.

    422 Fundamentals of Marketing Research (3:3).

    • Pr. ECO 250, grade of C- or better in 320; admission to approved program.

    Marketing information systems, sampling theory, experimental design, psychological scaling techniques, longitudinal analysis. Particular attention to assumption structure underlying each technique. Case studies and problem approach. Student develops programs of action on basis of marketing research results.

    424 Consumer Behavior (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 320; junior standing; admission to approved program.

    Psychological and socioeconomic factors affecting consumer motivation, behavior, and buying decisions. Emphasis on current research on, and theory about, behavior of consumers as individuals and as members of socioeconomic groups.

    426 International Marketing (3:3).

    • Pr. grade of C- or better in 320; admission to approved program.

    Practical aspects of marketing goods across national boundaries. Documentary complexities of international marketing emphasized.

    493 Honors Work (3-6).

    • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
    • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

     

    Business and Marketing Education Courses (BME)

    Courses For Undergraduates

    413 Special Problems in Business and Marketing Education (1 to 3).

    • Pr. junior standing.

    Opportunity for students to work individually on a problem of special interest. Student should secure recommendation from an instructor and consult with the Division Director before registering for the course.

    463 Business/Marketing Education Instructional Materials and Methods (3:3).

    • Pr. senior standing.

    Analysis, planning, and evaluation of instructions in business education and marketing education, including attention to special needs groups.

    465 Supervised Teaching (9).

    • Pr. 463; ELC 381, CUI 390, 450, 470.

    Observation, teaching under supervision, and participation in the total school and related community activities of a teacher. Full-time responsibility for at least twelve weeks.

    469 Business/Marketing Education Programs: Development, Organization, and Operation (3:3).

    • Pr. senior standing.

    Emphasizes historical development and present organizational structure of business education and marketing education at the district, regional and state levels.

    493 Honors Work (3-6).

    • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
    • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

     

    Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

    550 Directed Business Practice (1-4:1:3-12).

    • Pr. permission of instructor, admission to the Bryan School of Business and Economics or other professional program approved by the School.

    Planned work experience approved in advance by instructor. Regularly scheduled class attendance as well as reading, writing and skill practice assignments are required. (Same as BUS 550)

    555 Coordination of Work-Based Programs (3).

    • Pr. junior standing.

    Philosophy, principles, strategies, techniques, and procedures for coordination of work-based programs. Emphasis on elements common to all areas of work-based programs. Review and analysis of pertinent research.

    597 Survey of Business and Marketing Education (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing and permission of director.

    Designed primarily for business and marketing education teachers. Emphasis on philosophy and organization of business and marketing education programs in North Carolina, curriculum and instructional design, sources and uses of occupational information and program evaluative measures.

    598 Curriculum and Classroom Organization of Business and Marketing Programs (3:3).

    • Pr. junior standing and permission of director.

    Designed for pre-service and in-service teachers of business and marketing programs. Emphasis on curriculum development, teaching techniques, resources, facilities, and evaluation.

    599 Selected Topics in Business and/or Marketing Education (1 to 3).

    • Pr. junior standing and permission of division director.
    • May be repeated for credit if content is changed.

    Study of topics of common interest to those interested in business and/or marketing education. Group discussion and study rather than independent study emphasized. Generally non-recurring topics studied.


    Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level courses.

     
     
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