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Department of Chemistry
221 Petty Building

Chemistry Major (BA)Chemistry Major (BS)Chemistry Major (BS) with a concentration in BiochemistryChemistry MinorTeacher Licensure in ChemistryAccelerated Masters Program: BS in Chemistry and MS in ChemistryAccelerated Masters Program: BA in Chemistry and MBA in Business AdministrationChemistry Courses

 
 
Michael Farona, Professor and Head of Department
 

Professors Barborak, Herman, Jezorek, Knight, Miller, Nile; Associate Professors Banks, Walsh; Assistant Professors Galli, Haddy, Johnston, Raner; Laboratory Assistants Burnes, Katsikas

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degrees at the undergraduate level and the Master of Science and Master of Education degrees at the graduate level. The Department of Chemistry is included on the list of schools which have been accredited by the American Chemical Society. Students who follow the program leading to the B. S. degree are certified to the Society upon graduation as having met its rigorous requirements for undergraduate professional training in chemistry.

Students who elect chemistry as a major include those planning to work directly in the chemical industry on completion of the undergraduate degree; those planning to continue their studies at the advanced level and then enter either industrial or academic research and teaching; those preparing to teach at the secondary level; those preparing for professional training in medicine and dentistry; and those who will use their training in chemistry as a background to undertake work in related fields such as business, technical sales, and textiles. Many of our majors take considerable work in related programs, which include earning a minor, or in some cases a double major, in areas such as biology, economics, mathematics, physics, or textiles.

One of the features of our undergraduate program which we particularly emphasize is the opportunity for students to engage in undergraduate research. Many of our majors do so, principally in their junior and senior years, and this provides excellent training for those who intend to continue their studies at the graduate level. We encourage undergraduate chemistry majors, particularly those planning to enter teaching as a career, to work as teaching assistants in our lower level laboratory courses. This provides valuable training as well as financial assistance.

 

Chemistry Major (Bachelor of Arts)

Required: 122 semester hours

 

The Chemistry Major (BA), while less specialized than the BS program, provides sound training in chemistry. It offers fine preparation for those planning to enter medicine or dentistry, secondary school teaching, or various vocations within the chemical industry. In fact, by electing some additional courses in chemistry beyond the minimum required, the student may prepare for graduate work under this program as well as under the BS. While this program allows a more flexible arrangement of schedules, the student should work closely with a chemistry advisor to be certain that the proper sequence of chemistry and related area courses is taken with regard to the prerequisites.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours)

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

1. CHE 111, 112, 114, 115, 242, 331, 333, 351, 352, 354, 372, 401 (audit), 402, 461 or 506

2. Two courses from among CHE 442, 531, 556, and 581

Only chemistry courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be counted toward the major.

Related Area Requirements

1. MAT 191, 292

2. PHY 211, 212 and 251, 252 labs, or 291, 292, and 251, 252 labs

Electives

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for the degree. Additional advanced courses in mathematics are advised. CST 105 is recommended as a CRD requirement. Additional chemistry courses above the 100 level may be taken.

 

Chemistry Major (Bachelor of Science)

Required: 122 semester hours

 

The Chemistry Major (BS) differs from the BA in requiring additional advanced courses in chemistry and/or related sciences. It provides very thorough undergraduate training in chemistry and an excellent background for students planning to undertake graduate work or to enter the chemical industry. Students who complete this program will be certified to the American Chemical Society upon graduation as having fulfilled the Society's requirements for undergraduate professional training. The sequence in which the required courses are taken is important, and the student should work closely with a chemistry advisor in planning a schedule.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours)

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

CHE 111, 112, 114, 115, 242, 331, 333, 351, 352, 354, 372, 401 (audit), 402, 442, 461, 462, 463, 464, 531, 533, 581

Only Chemistry courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be counted toward the major.

Related Area Requirements

1. MAT 191, 292, 293

2. PHY 291, 292 and 251, 252 labs

3. At least two courses selected from: CHE 491, 492, 493 (minimum of 2 credit hours total for any combination of the previous three courses count as one course), 536, 553, 555, 556, 557, 570; BIO 355, 392, 422, 477, 479, 506, 538, 594; CSC 230, 322, 330, 339, 523, 524; MAT 310, 311, 340, 345, 390, 394, 395; PHY 321, 323, 325, 327, 512, 513, 521, 525

Electives

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for the degree. Additional advanced mathematics courses are advised. Additional chemistry courses above the 100 level may be taken.

B.S. in Chemistry with Concentration in Biochemistry

The Concentration in Biochemistry offers students the option to specialize in biochemistry within the curriculum leading to the B.S. in Chemistry. This concentration is designed to prepare students for graduate training in biochemistry, medicine and related professions, or for employment in biochemistry or biotechnology related industries. The sequence in which the required courses are taken is important, and the student should work closely with a chemistry advisor in planning a schedule.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours)

All students in this program must meet the College of Arts and Sciences All-University Liberal Education Requirements (CLER). See description under Chemistry Major (Bachelor of Science).

Major Requirements

CHE 111, 112, 114, 115, 242, 331, 333, 351, 352, 354, 372, 401 (audit), 402, 461, 462, 463, 531, 533, 556, 557, 558

Only Chemistry courses in which grades of C- or better are earned will be counted toward the Concentration.

Related Area Requirements

1. Advanced biochemistry: 3-4 credits from CHE 491, CHE 492 or BIO 594

2. BIO 111, 112, 392

3. MAT 191, 292

4. PHY 291, 292 and 251, 252 labs

Electives

Electives should be sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for the degree. One additional advanced biology course (e.g. BIO 355 or 481) is strongly recommended.

Chemistry Minor

A student may earn a minor in chemistry by completing a minimum of 19 semester hours in chemistry of which not more than 8 semester hours may be applied from introductory level courses (CHE 103, 104, 106, 110, 111, 112, 114, and 115.)

 

Teacher Licensure in Chemistry

Additional requirements for teacher licensure, beyond the Chemistry Major (BA), are listed in Part 7. In addition, students must take 6-8 credits in biology and/or earth science chosen from the following:

1. BIO 111, 112

2. GEO 103 and one or more of GEO 111, 205, 311, 314. CHE 252 is also recommended.

 

Accelerated Masters Program for Undergraduates BS in Chemistry and MS in Chemistry

 

The accelerated program in Chemistry provides the opportunity for a student with strong preparation in chemistry to complete a BS in Chemistry (122 hours) within a four-year period and to shorten the time required to finish the Master of Science degree in Chemistry.

Interested students should:

  • have some Advanced Placement credit upon admission to UNCG in order to reduce the number of required undergraduate hours. See available AP credit courses.
  • identify themselves as potential accelerated candidates early in their academic careers in order to receive appropriate advising. Although formal admission to an accelerated program usually occurs in the junior year, careful selection of undergraduate courses beginning in the freshman year is essential. Students should talk with an advisor in the department of Chemistry as early as possible.
  • plan to take the GRE in the spring of the junior year.
  • seek admission to the Graduate School in the fall of the senior year.

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BS in
Chemistry/MS in Chemistry

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BS in Chemistry/MS in Chemistry

A. College Liberal Arts Component (61 hours max) .

Special CLER area requirements for this program:
 Hrs Red
 Hrs
Mathematics (MT) required: MAT 191 (see C below)
-3
 3
Natural Science (NS) required for the CPS component: CHE 114, PHY 291 & 251 (see C below)
-7
9-10
See additional CLER area requirements and available AP Credit  x
 35-48
 Maximum hours
x
 48-61
 Total Hours (reduced)
 -10
 38-51

B. Chemistry Major (BS) Requirements (42 hours)

x
 Hrs
CHE 111, 112, 114 (meets part of CLER NS/CPS requirement), 115
8
CHE 242, 331, 333, 351, 352, 354, 372, 442, 461,462, 463, 464
27
CHE 401, 402
1
CHE 531, 533, 581
6
 Total Hours
 42

C. Related Requirements (22 hours)

x
 Hrs
MAT 191 (meets CLER MAT requirement), 292, 193
9
PHY 291 (meets part of CLER NS/CPS requirement), 292, 251, 252
8
Science electives
6-8
 Total Hours
20-22

Total Undergraduate Requirements (max)

 118

D. Other Undergraduate Electives 4 

Total Undergraduate Semester Hours

 122

E. Related Requirements for MS in Chemistry (30 hours)

Senior Year (6 hours)

 Hrs
CHE 553, 601 (Fall)
3
CHE 602, 632 (Spring)
3

Summer (3 hours)

x
Approved BIO or CHE elective
 3

Graduate or 5th Year (19 hours)

x
CHE 641, 661, approved BIO or CHE elective
 9
 CHE 680, 699 (Spring)
6-12

Total MS Semester Hours

 30

 

Accelerated Masters Program for Undergraduates BA in Chemistry and MBA in Business Administration

 

The accelerated program in Chemistry/Business Administration provides the opportunity for a student to complete a BA in Chemistry (122 hours) within a four-year period and to shorten the time required to finish the MBA.

Interested students should:

  • have some Advanced Placement credit upon admission to UNCG in order to reduce the number of required undergraduate hours. See AP credit courses.
  • identify themselves as potential accelerated candidates early in their academic careers in order to receive appropriate advising. Although formal admission to an accelerated program usually occurs in the junior year, careful selection of undergraduate courses beginning in the freshman year is essential. Students should talk with an advisor in the department of Chemistry as early as possible.

In the spring of the junior year, students should

  • take the GMAT
  • apply for admission to the Graduate School and the MBA program

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BA in Chemistry/MBA in Business Administration

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BA in Chemistry/MBA in Business Administration

A. College Liberal Arts Component (61 hours max) 

Special CLER area requirements for this program:
 Hrs Red
 Hrs
Mathematics (MT) required: MAT 191 (see C below)
-3
 3
Natural Science (NS) required for the CPS component: CHE 111, PHY 211 (see B & C below)
-7
9-10
Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB) required
-3
 9
ECO 201 (See D below) and two other SB courses  x  x
See additional CLER area requirements and available AP Credit x
 35-48
 Maximum hours
x
 48-61
 Total Hours (reduced)
 -13
 48

B. Chemistry Major (BA) Requirements (32-33 hours)

x
 Hrs
General Chemistry: CHE 111 (meets part of CLER NS/CPS requirement), 112, 114, 115
8
Inorganic Chemistry: CHE 242
2
Quantitative Analysis: CHE 331, 333
4
Organic Chemistry: CHE 351, 352, 354
8
Seminar: CHE 401, 402
1
Physical Chemistry: CHE 461 or 506
4
Two courses from: CHE 442, 531, 556, 581
5-6
 Total Hours
 32-33

C. Related Requirements (14 hours)

x
 Hrs
Calculus: MAT 191 (meets CLER MAT requirement), 292
6
Physics: PHY 211 (also meets part of CLER NS/CPS requirement), 212 or 291, 292 and 251, 252
8
 Total Hours
14

D. MBA Prerequisites (18 hours) 

ISM 110 (prerequisite for ECO 250)
3
ECO 201 (also meets part of CLER SB requirement), 202, 250
9
ACC 201, 202
6
Total Hours
18

Total Undergraduate Semester Hours

 112-
113

D. Other Undergraduate Electives 9-10

Total Undergraduate Semester Hours

 122

E. Related Requirements for the MBA (43.5 hours)

Senior Year (7.5 hours)

 Hrs
MBA 601, 604 (Fall)
3
MBA 605, 606, 607 (Spring)
4.5

Summer Following Senior Year (4.5 hours)

x
 Internship and 4.5 credits
 4.5

 Graduate or 5th Year (24 hours)

x
Required foundation and strategic management level requirements; electives
 24

 Summer (3 hours)

 x
Remaining required and elective courses
 7.5

Total MBA Semester Hours

 43.5

 

Chemistry Courses (CHE)

Courses For Undergraduates

 

103 General Descriptive Chemistry I (3:3).

  • Not open to students who have already taken 111.
  • Coreq. CHE 110 must be taken concurrently unless student takes CHE 104 or CHE 111 later.

Introductory course for students whose programs require only one year of college chemistry. Among the topics introduced are states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, stoichiometry, and solutions. [NS, CPS]. (FA)

104 General Descriptive Chemistry II (3:3).

  • Coreq. CHE 110 must be taken concurrently unless taken with CHE 103.

Applications of the principles introduced in 103 to representative inorganic, organic, and biological systems. Topics include equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, and introductory organic and biochemical concepts. Pr. 103 or permission of instructor. [NS, CPS]. (SP)

106 Introductory Chemistry (3:3).

  • For elementary education, business, and liberal arts majors.
  • Not open to students who have already taken 111 or 103.
  • CHE 110 is recommended.

Nonquantitative survey of fundamentals of measurement, molecular structure, reactivity, and organic chemistry; applications to textiles, environmental, consumer, biological, and drug chemistry. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3).

  • Coreq. to be taken concurrently with either 103 or 104. Also may accompany 106.

Designed to acquaint non-science majors with basic laboratory practices. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

111 General Chemistry I (3:3).

  • Pr. one year of high school chemistry. Students who lack high school chemistry should take the sequence 103, 111, 114. All students must take 112 concurrently unless they have previous credit for an equivalent course.

Fundamental principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry, atomic structure, and states of matter. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

112 General Chemistry I Laboratory (1:0:3).

  • CHE 111 must be taken concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 111. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

114 General Chemistry II (3:3)..

  • Pr. 111, 112. All students must take 115 concurrently unless they have previous credit for an equivalent course.
  • Designed primarily for science majors and is the prerequisite to upper level courses in chemistry

Continuation of 111 with attention to ionic equilibria, elementary kinetics and thermodynamics, acid-base theory, coordination chemistry, and electrochemistry. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

115 General Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:3).

  • Pr. 112 or equivalent. CHE 114 must be taken concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 114. Includes semi-micro qualitative analysis and ionic equilibria experiments. [NS, CPS]. (FA,SP)

205 Introductory Organic Chemistry (3:3).

  • Pr. 104, 110; or 114, 115. All students must take 206 concurrently unless they have previous credit for an equivalent course.
  • Students cannot receive credit for both 205 and 351.

A course in organic chemistry designed for students whose programs require only one semester in this area. (FA)

206 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1:0:3).

  • Pr. 205 concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 205. (FA)

242 Inorganic Chemistry (2:2).

  • Pr. 114, 115.

Introduction to descriptive inorganic chemistry, including oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base and coordination chemistry. (FA)

252 Chemistry and the Human Environment (3:3).

  • Pr. 104, 106, or 114 or permission of instructor.

Study of chemical problems central to current technological, biomedical, and environmental issues. Topics include energy alternatives, food chemicals, environmental chemistry, molecular basis of drug action, and consumer products. (SP)

331 Quantitative Analysis (3:3).

  • Pr. 114, 115. All students must take 333 concurrently unless they have previous credit for an equivalent course.

Introduction to the theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric methods of analysis. Herman, Jezorek, Walsh. (FA)

333 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. 331 concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 331. Herman, Jezorek, Walsh. (FA)

351 Organic Chemistry I (4:4).

  • Pr. 114, 115.

Chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds with attention to reaction mechanisms and synthetic applications, and the application of spectroscopy to structure determination. Banks, Barborak, Johnston, Knight. (FA)

352 Organic Chemistry II (3:3).

  • Pr. 351. All students must take 354 concurrently unless they have previous credit for an equivalent course.

Continuation of 351 with attention to alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, lipids, carbohydrates, and organic spectroscopy. (SP)

354 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. 352 concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 352. Includes basic techniques of organic laboratory practice plus preparations involving representative reactions. (SP)

372 Introduction to Laboratory Methods (2:2).

  • Pr. 104 or 114, 351 or 205.

An introduction to the practical skills of laboratory work, to include safe handling and disposal of chemicals, laboratory practice and equipment, data handling, chemical literature, and searching for chemical information. (SP).

401 Chemistry Seminar Introduction (0:0).

  • Pr. 372, senior standing.
  • Students will audit 401 and receive credit for 402.

Preparation for seminar. Introduction to the selection of seminar topics and seminar presentation techniques. Attendance at weekly seminars required. (FA,SP) (Formerly CHE 501)

402 Chemistry Seminar (1:1).

  • Pr. 401.
  • Students will audit 401 and receive credit for 402.

Oral reports and discussion of topics from the current chemistry by students, staff, and guest lecturers. Attendance at weekly seminars is required. (FA,SP) (Formerly CHE 502)

442 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3:3).

  • Pr. 242, 461, or 506 (461 or 506 may be taken concurrently).

Modern concepts of chemical bonding and its application to inorganic reactions and periodic relationships. (SP)

461 Physical Chemistry I (4:4).

  • Pr. MAT 292 and PHY 292.

Chemical thermodynamics and equilibrium processes covered, including phase equilibria, thermodynamics of solutions, kinetics, and electrochemistry. (FA)

462 Physical Chemistry II (3:3).

  • Pr. 461.

Subject material deals with microscopic world including introductions to quantum mechanics, molecular spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and kinetics. (SP)

463 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. 331, 333, 461 (preferably taken concurrently with 462).

Laboratory work related to 461 with emphasis on mathematical treatment of experimental data and communication of results in report form. (SP)

464 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. must be taken concurrently with 462 and 463.

Additional laboratory work primarily in kinetics and the determination of molecular structure. This is a writing emphasis course. Galli (SP)

491, 492 Independent Study (1 to 3), (1 to 3).

  • Pr. two years of chemistry and permission of department head and instructor under whom student wishes to work.
  • May be repeated for credit.

Directed program of independent study and research for the qualified student. (FA-491; SP-492)

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

506 Introductory Physical Chemistry (4:4).

  • Pr. two semesters of chemistry beyond general chemistry, MAT 292, one year of physics.
  • Credit for an undergraduate degree cannot be received for both 506 and 461.

Concepts basic to chemical kinetics, equilibrium, energetics, spectroscopy, solution phenomena, electrochemistry, and colloidal behavior with applications to biological systems. (SP)

531 Instrumental Analysis (3:3).

  • Pr. 331, 333, 352 (may be taken concurrently), PHY 102 or 292.

Theory and practice of advanced analytical techniques with emphasis on instrumental methods of analysis. (SP)

533 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. 531 concurrently.

Laboratory work to accompany 531. Herman, Jezorek. (SP)

536 Computers in Chemistry (3:3).

  • Pr. two semesters of chemistry beyond general chemistry; one semester of calculus; one year of physics; one semester of programming in a higher level language; or permission of instructor.

Introduction to analysis of chemical data and control of chemical instruments with digital computers. Designed primarily for chemistry majors but may be taken by other interested science majors.

553 Advanced Organic Chemistry I (3:3).

  • Pr. 352.

Advanced topics in organic chemistry with special emphasis on reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. (FA)

555 Organometallic Chemistry (2:2).

  • Pr. CHE 352, 442.

Theoretical and synthetic aspects of organometallic chemistry and applications to catalysis and synthetic organic chemistry. (SP)

556 Biochemistry I (3:3).

  • Pr. CHE 352, BIO 111-112.

Introductory biochemistry presented from a chemical perspective. Topics include amino acids, proteins and enzymes, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, membranes, and carbohydrate catabolism. Banks, (FA)

557 Biochemistry II (3:3).

  • Pr. CHE 352, BIO 111-112, CHE 556 or permission of instructor.

Continuation of CHE 556. Enzyme catalytic mechanisms, additional topics in intermediary metabolism, genetic biochemistry, and selected topics in molecular physiology. (SP)

558 Biochemistry Laboratory (1:0:4).

  • Pr. 556 or equivalent, 354, 333 or permission of instructor.

Introduction to biochemical techniques, including isolation, purification and characterization of biological molecules. (SP)

570 Advanced Special Topics in Chemistry (1 to 3).

  • Pr. Permission of instructor.

Studies at an advanced level dealing with specialized areas of chemistry in which there is special expertise among departmental faculty. Areas of offering to be identified as follows: 570a, Analytical; 570b, Biochemistry; 570c, Inorganic; 570d, Organic; 570e, Physical.

581 Synthetic Techniques (2:0:8).

  • Pr. 242, 352, 354, 372.

Theoretical discussion and laboratory practice in modern methods of synthesis in the areas of organic and inorganic chemistry. Emphasis given to regions of overlap such as organometallic chemistry. Areas covered include high temperature and high pressure reactions, photochemistry, reaction kinetics, inert atmosphere reactions, microtechniques, and the use of modern instrumentation to determine product structure. (FA)

 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level courses.


 
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