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Department of Classical Studies
237 McIver Building

 

Classical Studies Major (BA)Classical Civilization ConcentrationClassical Archaeology ConcentrationGreek Language and Literature ConcentrationLatin Language and Literature ConcentrationClassical Studies as a Second MajorClassical Studies MinorTeacher Licensure in LatinClassical Civilization CoursesGreek CoursesLatin Courses

 

Jeffrey S. Soles, Professor and Head of Department
 
Associate Professor Shelmerdine; Assistant Professors Parker, Wharton; Lecturers Danford, Panciera, Smith, Thurmond

The Department of Classical Studies provides a comprehensive approach to the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world. The Department believes that students should have a solid foundation in the language, history, and culture of Greek and Roman civilization. To this end, the program is designed to ensure that all students gain proficiency in the Greek or Latin language, as well as a broad understanding of Classical literature in its cultural and historical context, the influence of Graeco-Roman civilization on the conceptions and values of Western civilization, and the methods of critical inquiry which are central to the discipline of Classical Studies.

The Department offers a wide variety of courses in English on mythology, archaeology, literature and culture, as well as courses in ancient Greek and Latin at all levels. Courses with a CCI prefix require no knowledge of either language; GRK courses require reading of texts in Greek and LAT courses require reading of texts in Latin. The following departmental courses also satisfy AULER categories as designated: CCI 201, 202, 211, 212, 220, 230, 323 (Historical Perspectives on Western Culture); CCI 205, 305, 306, 321, 324, 325 (World Literature).

Students also have an opportunity in the summer to visit Athens, Rome, and other parts of the Classical world, to participate in archaeological excavation, and to earn semester hours of credit through CCI 393, 394, 401, or 450; GRK 393, 394; LAT 393, 394; or through Study Abroad Programs (see p. 225).

Classical Studies Major (Bachelor of Arts)

Required: 122 semester hours

The Department offers a BA in Classical Studies, with four distinct concentrations in Greek Language and Literature, Latin Language and Literature, Classical Civilization, and Classical Archaeology. All four concentrations offer a broad liberal arts experience which provides an excellent foundation for a variety of careers including law, business, government, journalism, and teaching.

The Greek Language and Literature and the Latin Language and Literature concentrations are designed to ensure a solid preparation in the chosen language and to acquaint students with those works which form the origin of European literature, history, and philosophy. These concentrations prepare students for graduate work in the Classical languages and literature and for secondary school language teaching.

The Classical Civilization and Classical Archaeology concentrations provide a solid and wide-ranging background for understanding the origin and development of our Western ideas, values, languages, institutions, attitudes, and art. The Classical Civilization concentration is an excellent second major, particularly for those interested in any area of primary or secondary school teaching. The Classical Archaeology concentration is intended especially for students wishing to pursue graduate work in Classical Archaeology. Students interested in other areas of archaeology should also consider the Special Program in Liberal Studies in Archaeology (p. 217).

 

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER)
(54-55 hours required)

 

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

Minimum 24 hours distributed as follows in one of the four possible concentrations. Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA for courses in the major:

Greek Language and Literature

a) 15 hours in Greek language: any course with a GRK prefix except GRK 150

b) 6 hours in literature in translation to be chosen from CCI 205, 206, 305, 306, 321, 397, 398, 405

c) 3 hours in Greek archaeology or history to be chosen from CCI 201, 211, 220, 230, 313, 314, 323, 351, 353

Latin Language and Literature

a) 15 hours in Latin language above the 100 level: any course with a LAT prefix, except LAT 101 and 102
b) 6 hours in literature in translation to be chosen from CCI 205, 206, 305, 306, 324, 325, 397, 398, 405, 502
c) 3 hours in Roman archaeology or history to be chosen from CCI 202, 212, 220, 230, 314, 323, 354, 355, 512

Classical Civilization

a) 12 hours in either Greek or Latin (except GRK 150)
b) 12 hours in civilization from courses in literature in translation, archaeology, and ancient history (to be selected with Department Advisor)

Classical Archaeology

a) CCI 211, CCI 212 (6 hours)
b) 6 hours to be chosen from CCI 312, 313, 314, 512
c) 9 hours in classical literature in translation or ancient history to be chosen from CCI 201, 202, 205, 206, 220, 230, 305, 306, 321, 323, 324, 325, 351, 353, 354, 355, 397, 398, 405, 502
d) 3 hours in either Greek or Latin at the intermediate level: GRK 203 or 204 or LAT 203 or 204

Under special circumstances and with the permission of the Department Head, some substitutions for required courses may be allowed.

Related Area Requirements

No specific courses required.

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for degree.

 

Classical Studies as a Second Major

Required: 24 semester hours.

 

See the description of major requirements listed above. The Classical Civilization concentration is particularly recommended for students in the Teacher Education program who need a second major and are satisfying their language requirement by taking Greek or Latin. Students seeking Middle Grades certification in Language Arts must also take ENG 321, 322.

 

Classical Studies Minor

Required: 15-21 semester hours.

 

The Classical Studies Minor complements majors in a variety of fields including anthropology, art, English, foreign languages, history, philosophy, and religious studies. Requirements are flexible enough to permit students to develop and extend their major plan of study. The minor consists of 15 to 21 hours in courses above the 100 level to be worked out with the department advisor as best suited to each student's academic program.

 

Teacher Licensure in Latin

The Department of Classical Studies cooperates with the School of Education to prepare students for teaching Latin at the secondary level. The aim of the departmental program is three-fold:

1) to promote proficiency in Latin by providing courses which focus on grammatical analysis and reading of Latin texts with understanding, and which cover a range of genres and authors;

2) to make available a full variety of courses in literature, civilization, and advanced language training to ensure students a broad base of cultural and linguistic experiences;

3) to promote an understanding of and appreciation for the Classical foundations of the Western tradition.

Students seeking teacher licensure in Latin are required to take a minimum of 27 semester hours distributed as follows:

1) 15 hours in Latin above the 100 level.

2) 3 hours in Latin Grammar and Composition (LAT 431)

3) CCI 205, and 3 additional hours in Classical Literature

4) CCI 202

In addition, students must meet additional requirements in General and Professional Education (see "Teacher Education," Part 7). For further information concerning these requirements students should consult with their advisor from the Department of Classical Studies.

 

Classical Civilization Courses (CCI)

Courses in English Translation; no knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

 

Courses For Undergraduates

201 Introduction to Classical Civilization: The Greeks (3:3).

Introduction to Greek civilization from its beginnings to the Hellenistic age. Lectures and discussion will focus on the development of Greek literature, thought, and art in the context of society. [HP, CHP-CPM].

202 Introduction to Classical Civilization: The Romans (3:3).

Introduction to Roman civilization from its beginnings to the Roman Empire. Lectures and discussion will focus on the development of Roman literature, thought, and art in the context of society. [HP, CHP-CPM].

205 Mythology (3:3).

Great myths of the world with emphasis on their literary and artistic representations. Greek and Roman mythologies stressed; Norse and other myths included when possible. Only primary sources read. [WL, CWL].

206 Classical Origins of the English Language (3:3).

Analysis of Greek and Latin prefixes, stems, and suffixes used in English. Emphasis on the history of beliefs, institutions, and traditions reflected in the Greek and Latin elements.

211 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (Greece) (3:3).

Archaeological consideration of the Mycenaean, Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods of Greek civilization. [HP, CHP-CPM].

212 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (Rome) (3:3).

Archaeological consideration of the Italian Peninsula with emphasis on the Etruscan sites and Rome. [HP, CHP-CPM].

220 The Ancient World (3:3).

Early civilizations: Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman to Reign of Constantine. [HP, CHP-CPM]. (Same as HIS 220)

230 Women in Antiquity (3:3).

Public and private lives of Greek and Roman women of the Classical Period, focusing on women's political, religious, and domestic roles, their general social status, health and welfare. [HP, CHP-CPM].

305 Classical Tragedy (3:3).

Study of Greek tragedians of Athens in the fifth century and their subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca. [WL, CWL].

306 Classical Comedy (3:3).

Study of Greek comedy in the fifth and fourth centuries and its subsequent influence on later literature. Readings from Aristophanes, Menander, Terence, and Plautus. [WL, CWL].

312 The Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3:3).

Introduction to the archaeology of Egypt, emphasizing the relations between Egypt and the Aegean in the Bronze Age.

313 Archaeology of the Aegean (3:3).

Introduction to the Minoans and Mycenaeans. The archaeology of the Aegean Islands, Crete, the coast of Asia Minor, including Troy, and the mainland of Greece in the Bronze Age.

314 Ancient Cities (3:3).

Introduction to the great cities of the past, emphasizing the physical design of those cities, especially as it reflects changing political and social structures.

321 The Archaic Age (3:3).

Study of the Greek Archaic period, from the end of the Homeric Age to the dawn of the Classical era. Focus on literature, art, and religion within their social context. [WL, CWL].

323 The World of Alexander the Great. (3:3).

An introduction to the Hellenistic period of Greek civilization, emphasizing its art and architecture, its religion and literature in their historical context. [HP, CHP-CPM].

324 The Age of Cicero (3:3).

Introduction to Roman literature and society in the first century B.C. Focus on the development of the genres of Latin literature and the relationship between politics and literature. [WL, CWL].

325 The Age of Augustus (3:3).

Introduction to Roman literature and society during the reign of Augustus. Focus on the development of Latin epic poetry, historical writing, and elegy, and the relationship between authors and Emperor. [WL, CWL].

351 History of Greece, 2000-31 B.C. (3:3).

Mycenaean society, Greek "dark ages," colonization and tyranny, Athens and Sparta, flowering in the fifth and fourth centuries, conquests of Alexander, Hellenistic empires, and the diffusion of Greek civilization. (Same as HIS 351.).

353 Athens in the Fifth Century B.C. (3:3).

Study of the social and political history of Athens in the fifth century B.C. Pr. 209 or 351 or permission of instructor. (Same as HIS 353.)

354 The Roman Republic, 754 B.C.-44 B.C. (3:3).

Study of the social and political forces that led to Rome's conquest of the Mediterranean World and of the transformation which world conquest wrought on Rome itself. Topics covered include: the Roman Constitution and politics, the Roman conquest of Italy and then of the whole Mediterranean, and the decline of the Republic. (Same as HIS 354.)

355 The Roman Empire, 44 B.C-337 A.D. (3:3).

Survey of politics and society at Rome under the Empire, when Rome dominated Western Civilization. Topics covered include: Augustus and the rise of one-man rule at Rome, the long "Roman Peace" and the civilizing of Europe under the Emperors, the rise of Christianity, and the transformed Empire of Constantine the Great. (Same as HIS 355.)

393, 394 Classical Studies Abroad (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of department.

Extensive reading in Greek and Latin literature in translation, ancient history and archaeology, selected in accordance with student needs. For students participating in foreign study programs.

397 Comparative Studies in World Epics (3:3).

Major world epics in translation including the following works in whole or in part: Gilgamesh, Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid, Chanson de Roland, Divine Comedy, Jerusalem Delivered, Beowulf, Joyce's Ulysses.

398 Comparative Studies in World Drama (3:3).

Greek, Latin, and modern plays in translation: representative plays from Aeschylus through Euripides, Seneca, Terence, Racine, O'Neill, Cocteau, Anouilh, et al.

401 Archaeological Practicum (1 to 3).

  • May be repeated for credit.

Participation in the department's archaeological work in Greece and opportunity to learn the field methods of classical archaeology firsthand.

405 Advanced Studies in Mythology (3:3).

  • Pr. CCI 205 or permission of the instructor.

Study of selected myths from Greece, Rome, and comparative cultures. Focus on original literature, supplemented by ancient and modern critical works. Topics will vary; see description for each term.

450 Internship in Classical Studies (1 to 6).

  • Pr. consent of department head.
  • May be repeated once, for a maximum of 12 hours credit, with the provision that no more than 6 hours may be taken in the same country.

Supervised field experience in museums or institutes devoted to the study of Ancient Greece or Rome and/or visitation of classical sites.

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

501 Independent Study (1 to 3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for credit for up to 6 hours.

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruction in Classical Studies.

502 History of Latin Literature (3:3).

  • Pr. Permission of instructor.

A survey of Latin literature in English translation from the third century B.C. to the beginnings of the Middle Ages.

512 The Archaeology of Roman Daily Life (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.

Study of Roman daily life and the evidence form archaeology and ancient literature for daily life.

541 Ancient World: Selected Topics (3:3).

  • May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

Varying topics in ancient Near Eastern, Greek, and Roman history, including politics and public rituals, patterns of social organization, ancient slavery, cross-cultural interactions. (Same as HIS 541)

 

Greek Courses (GRK)

These courses require the reading of texts in Greek.

 

Courses For Undergraduates

 

150 Applied Modern Greek (1:1).

  • Pr. open to all students with instructor's permission.
  • May be repeated for credit up to 4 semester hours. · Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP).
  • Will NOT satisfy foreign language requirement.

Training in spoken demotic Greek.

201, 202 Elementary Greek (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 201 prerequisite to 202.

Introduction to ancient Greek. Two semester sequence includes essentials of grammar and reading of selections from Xenophon, Plato, New Testament and others. Emphasis on understanding principles of grammar and developing skills for reading Greek. (FA: GRK 201)

203, 204 Intermediate Greek (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. a grade of C- or better in GRK 202, or permission of instructor; 203 prerequisite to 204.

Designed to develop proficiency in the reading of ancient Greek and introduce students to Greek literature. Fall semester: Prose (Plato, Lysias, Herodotus, etc.) Spring semester: Poetry (Homer or Greek tragedy). [CFL].

303, 304 Greek Drama (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selected works of Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, and Aristophanes.

311 The Greek Orators (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the works of Greek orators; emphasis on Antiphon, Lysias, Isocrates, and Demosthenes.

312, 313 Greek Historical Writers (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 203, 204 previously or taken concurrently.

Selections from the works of the Greek historians; emphasis on Herodotus and Thucydides.

331 The New Testament (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of the instructor.

Selections from the New Testament.

341 Homer (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from Iliad and Odyssey.

350, 351 Special Topics in Greek Studies (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 203, 204. Student should consult instructor before registering for course.

Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups on problems of special interest in Greek literature or language. Work may represent either survey of a given field or intensive investigation of particular problem.

393, 394 The Study of Greek Abroad (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 204 and permission of department.

Extensive reading in Greek literature selected in accordance with student needs. For students participating in foreign study programs.

401 The Greek Epic (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the works of Homer, Hesiod, and Apollonius of Rhodes.

403 Greek Lyric Poetry (3:3).

  • Pr. 203, 204 completed or taken concurrently.

Survey of Greek lyric poetry with emphasis on Sappho and Alcaeus; the pastoral poetry of Theocritus, Bion, and Moschus.

405 Hellenistic Poetry (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from Hellenistic poetry; emphasis on Callimachus and Theocritus.

421 The Greek Philosophers (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and representatives of the Hellenistic schools.

450 Seminar in Greek Studies (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Extensive reading in literature of the Classics selected in accordance with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, and quizzes throughout the semester.

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

501 Independent Study (1 to 3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruction in Greek language and literature.

550 Topics in Greek Studies (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

Studies in selected topics in Greek literature or language, e.g., the development of a genre, the nature of a period in literary history, or the treatment of a particular theme.

 

Latin Courses (LAT)

 

These courses require the reading of texts in Latin. Students who have a background in high school Latin must take the Latin placement exam before registering for any Latin courses.

Courses For Undergraduates

101,102 Elementary Latin (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 101, none; 102, LAT 101 or appropriate score on the Latin placement exam.

Introduction to Latin. Two semester sequence includes essentials of grammar and selected readings. Emphasis on understanding principles of grammar and developing skills for reading Latin. (FA,SP)

140 Elementary Latin Review (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.

Accelerated elementary curriculum for students with previous Latin experience or a demonstrable aptitude for second-language acquisition. (FA)

203, 204 Intermediate Latin (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. a grade of C- or better in LAT 102, or permission of instructor; 203 prerequisite to 204.

Designed to develop proficiency in the reading of Latin and introduce students to Latin literature. Fall semester: Prose (Caesar, Cicero, etc.). Spring semester: Poetry (selections from Virgil's Aeneid I-VI). [CFL].

301 Roman Lyric Poetry. (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the poetry of Catullus and Horace.

302 Roman Letters and Men of Letters (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the letters of Cicero, Pliny, and Seneca.

303 Roman Drama (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the tragedies of Seneca and their influence on Renaissance drama.

311 The Roman Orators (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from the speeches and rhetorical works of Cicero and of other Roman orators.

312 The Roman Historians: The Republic (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Works of Julius Caesar, Sallust's Catiline, and extensive selections from Cicero's letters and orations.

321 Roman Satire (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Study of the satires of Persius, Horace, and Juvenal; emphasis on Juvenal; influence on the eighteenth century.

350, 351 Special Topics in Latin Literature (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 203, 204. Student should consult instructor before registering for course.

Opportunity for students to work individually or in small groups on problems of special interest in Latin literature or language. Work may represent either survey of a given field or intensive investigation of particular problem.

393, 394 The Study of Latin Abroad (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 204 and permission of department.

Extensive reading in Latin literature selected in accordance with student needs. For students participating in foreign study programs.

400 Intensive Reading of Latin (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of the instructor.

Systematic review of Latin grammar and intensive reading of selected authors intended to prepare students for further work in Latin.

401 Virgil (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Virgil's Aeneid VII-XII; reading from the Eclogues and Georgics.

405 Poetry in the Age of Augustus (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Survey of Latin literature from 40 B.C. to 14 A.D.; selections from Virgil, Horace, the elegiac poets, and Ovid.

412 The Roman Historians: The Empire (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from works of Livy and Tacitus.

421 Roman Philosophical Writings (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Selections from essays of Cicero, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius and essays of Seneca.

431 Latin Grammar and Composition (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Intensive study of Latin grammar, syntax, and prose style; includes reading of Latin texts and translation into Latin from English. Required for "A" certification in Latin.

450 Seminar in Latin Studies (3:3).

  • Pr. 204, or permission of instructor.

Extensive readings in literature of the Classics selected in accordance with student needs. Periodic conferences, written reports, and quizzes throughout the semester.

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

 

501 Independent Study (1 to 3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

Directed program of readings, research, and individual instruction in Latin language.

550 Topics in Latin Studies (3:3).

  • May be repeated once for credit when topic varies.

Studies in selected topics in Latin literature or languages, e.g., the development of a genre, the nature of a period in literary history, or the treatment of a particular theme.

571 Medieval and Renaissance Latin (3:3).

  • Pr. permission of the instructor.

Selections from Medieval and Renaissance prose and poetry.

 

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level courses.

 
 
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