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Department of German and Russian
including Japanese Studies
337-A McIver Building

German Major (BA)Teacher LicensureGerman Second MajorGerman MinorRussian MinorAccelerated ProgramGerman CoursesRussian CoursesJapanese Courses

Joachim T. Baer, Professor and Head of Department

Professor Lixl; Associate Professor Adams; Lecturers Ahern, Jensen, Nilsson, Pynes, Yabe

The aim of the Department of German and Russian is to convey a deeper understanding for important foreign languages and cultures in the context of a liberal and humanistic education.

The following courses are intended both to impart useful skills and to contribute to the student's intellectual development and aesthetic experience. Language instruction courses provide the students with a basic speaking knowledge and with a reading knowledge that will enable them to inform themselves independently about the life and literature of German- and Russian-speaking countries. More advanced courses emphasize literary study and culture, which are the actual goals of the major in German.

The language laboratory provides the student with the facilities for aural and oral exercises. Cultural material such as films, records, and tapes is coordinated with classroom work. Students may also elect to live in UNCG's International House.

For all interested students a German coffee hour (Kaffeestunde) is held once a week, where students and faculty meet socially to speak German. The UNCG film program provides a German full-length film each month, and several Russian films each semester.

From time to time a UNCG Summer Study Abroad travel program in German-speaking countries is offered. Information on other summer programs abroad is available.

A major in German works in tandem with an International Business Studies major (first or second major). Students are strongly advised to familiarize themselves with this program's offerings on p. 218 in this Bulletin.

Majors in UNCG's International Studies major with a concentration in Russian Studies may spend a semester or academic year at Joensuu University (Finland) and/or at Petrozavodsk University (Russia).

Majors in UNCG's International Studies major with a concentration in Russian Studies (for requirements, see pp. 217-218) may spend a semester or academic year at Joensuu University (Finland) and/or at Petrozavodsk University (Russia).

 

German Major (Bachelor of Arts)

Required: 122 semester hours.

 

The German Major, depending on the student's interest and other abilities, may lead into various careers such as teaching, government and international trade. The specialized study of German aims to improve language skills and to convey understanding of German culture, through the study of literature, film and works of German thought.

Students seeking teacher licensure should see "Teacher Education Programs," Part 7.

College of Arts and Sciences Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) (54-55 hours)

All students must meet the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). The College of Arts and Sciences, however, has established liberal education requirements for its programs which, while including those of AULER, contain additional requirements in several categories. Therefore, students following this program should adhere to the College requirements. Please note that students who satisfy the College Liberal Education Requirements (CLER) will also satisfy the All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER). See College requirements and courses meeting AULER/CLER requirements.

Major Requirements

All majors must maintain a GPA of at least 2.0 in German courses for a degree in German.

Minimum of 24 semester hours in German above the 204 level, including at least:

1. Two courses from GER 301W, 302W, 307, 311, 407. (At least one course must be from 301W, 302W.)

2. Any two of the following: GER 215, 216, 305, 306, 403, 404, 405, or 406

3. At least SIX total courses at the 300 level or above

4. At least FOUR total courses involving literature or cultural studies.

NOTE: Courses in German literature or culture in English translation (215, 216, 217, 218, 221) can only be used for Major credit if an appropriate amount of reading is done in German.

Related Area Requirements

Suggested but not required: ART 305; ATY 385, 387, 587; ENG 201, 202, 339, 340; HIS 375, 376, 391, 392; RUS 201, 202, 313, 314, 315, 316; PHI 252, 330.

Electives

Electives sufficient to complete the 122 semester hours required for degree.

 

Teacher Licensure in German

Students seeking teacher licensure must include GER 301 and all other courses required for German majors. Please see additional teacher licensure requirements in "Teacher Education Programs", Part 7.

 

German as a Second Major

The requirements for a second major in German are the same as for the German major above.

 

German Minor

15 hours above German 102, including at least 6 hours at the 300-level. NOTE: Courses in German literature or culture in English translation (215, 216, 217, 218, 221) can only be used for minor credit if an appropriate amount of reading is done in German.

 

Russian Minor

15 hours above the 100-level of which the following six are compulsory:

RUS 203, 204

 

Accelerated Masters Program for Undergraduates:
BA in German and MBA in Business Administration

The accelerated program in German/Business Administration provides the opportunity for a student to complete a BA in German (122 hours) within a four-year period and to shorten the time required to finish the MBA.

Interested students should:

  • have some Advanced Placement credit upon admission to UNCG in order to reduce the number of required undergraduate hours. See AP credit courses.
  • identify themselves as potential accelerated candidates early in their academic careers in order to receive appropriate advising. Although formal admission to an accelerated program usually occurs in the junior year, careful selection of undergraduate courses beginning in the freshman year is essential. Interested students should talk with the Department Head in the Department of German and Russian as early as possible.

In the spring of the junior year, students should:

  • take the GMAT
  • apply for admission to the Graduate School and the MBA program

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BA in German/MBA in Business Administration

Requirements for Combined Accelerated BA in German/MBA in Business Administration

A. College Liberal Arts Component (61 hours max)

Special CLER area requirements for this program:

 Hrs Red
 Hrs
Mathematics (MT) required: MAT 120 or 191 (see C below)
-3
3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB) required: ECO 201 (see C below), and two other SB courses
-3
9
World Literature (WL) required: GER 217, 218, or 221 (see B below)
-3
3
Foreign Language (CFL) satisfied by placement exam 0-12
-12
12
See additional CLER area requirements and available AP credit. x
 21-34
 Maximum hours
x
 48-61
 Total Hours (reduced)
-21
 39-40

B. German Major Requirements (24 hours)

Note GER 204 or an appropriate score on the placement exam is a prerequisite for GER 301 and above.

x
 Hrs
GER 301 or 302
3
GER 217 or 218 or 221 (with appropriate amount of reading done in German, courses also meet CWL requirements)
3
GER 303 and one of the following: GER 205, 206, 304, 315, or 316
6
Additional courses (recommended: GER 305, 306, 307, 308, 311)
12
 Total Hours
24

C. Prerequisites for the MBA (21 hours)

x
 Hrs
MAT 120 or 191 (also meets CLER MT requirement and is prerequisite for ECO 250)
3
ISM 110 (prerequisite for ECO 250)
3
ECO 201 (also meets part of CLER SB requirement), 202, 250
9
ACC 201, 202
6
 Total Hours
21

Total Undergraduate Requirements

 84-85

D. Other Undergraduate Electives 37-38

Total Undergraduate Semester Hours

 122

E. Related Requirements for the MBA (43.5 hours)

Senior Year (7.5 hours)

 Hrs
MBA 601, 604 (Fall)
3
MBA 605, 606, 607 (Spring)
4.5

Summer Following Senior Year (4.5 hours)

x
Internship and 4.5 credits
 4.5

Graduate or 5th Year (24 hours)

x
Required foundation and strategic management level requirements; electives
24

 Summer (3 hours)

9
Remaining required and elective courses
7.5

Total MBA Semester Hours

 43.5

 

German Courses (GER)

Courses Read in English

German literature courses read in English translation are as follows:

215, 216 German Civilization. Readings in English (3:3), (3:3).
217, 218 Masterworks of German Literature Read in English (3:3), (3:3).
221 Germanic Mythology. Readings in English (3:3).

A full description of the above courses will be found in numerical order in the German courses listed below.

For Undergraduates

101, 102 Elementary German (3:3), (3:3).

Essentials of grammar, graded reading, vocabulary building. Language laboratory required.

101L Elementary German Laboratory (1:1).

  • Coreq. concurrent registration in 101.

Optional supplementary multi-media lab course at the elementary level for students interested in improving their command of the language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester.

102L Elementary German Laboratory (1:1).

  • Coreq. concurrent registration in 102 or permission of instructor.

Optional supplementary multi-media lab course at the elementary level for students interested in improving their command of the language. Course meets one hour a week for the whole semester.

203 Intermediate German (3:3).

  • Pr. 102.

Continuation of the essentials of grammar begun in 101, 102. Language laboratory required. [CFL]

204W Intermediate German Topics (3:3).

  • Pr. 203 or equivalent.

Reading, composition and discussion, at an intermediate level, based on German texts on various topics. (Course taught as writing intensive.) [CFL]

212 Experimental Course: The New German Cinema (3:3).

Introduction to and survey of "New German Film" developments since 1962. Focus will be on German filmmakers' response to modern American (Hollywood) film as a way of defining the New German Film. Includes films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, and others. (Offered FA98)

215, 216 German Civilization. Readings in English (3:3), (3:3).

Cultural, political, and social development of Germany from its origin to the present. 215 - Middle Ages (Romanesque, Gothic) through the fifteenth century. 216 - from the Reformation to the present. Attention given to the German elements in America. Use of films, slides, and records. Taught in English. Majors required to do additional reading in German. [215: HP/CPM; 216: HP/CMO] (Formerly GER 315, 316)

217, 218 Masterworks of German Literature Read in English (3:3), (3:3).

Reading and discussion in English translation of some of the best works of German literature. 217 - the Middle Ages, Baroque and Classical Periods, Romanticism, Realism. 218 - Selected major works of 20th century prose fiction. Authors include Kafka, Hesse, T. Mann, Handke, M. Walser, and Süskind. [WL, CWL].

221 Germanic Mythology. Readings in English (3:3).

Course taught in translation. Myths of Northern Europe, their main personages and events as preserved in the heroic sagas and epics, the traces of these myths in later literature, in folklore and art, the history of their revival in the nineteenth century (Brothers Grimm, Richard Wagner), the variety of interpretations given to them. [WL, CWL].

301W Topics for German Conversation and Composition (3:3).

For students desiring some proficiency in spoken and written German. Conversation and composition based on various announced topics. Attendance at Kaffeestunde required unless excused by instructor. (Course taught as writing intensive.)

302W Topics for Advanced German Composition and Stylistics (3:3).

For students desiring proficiency in written German, especially geared toward students who plan to study abroad or who plan to enter graduate school. Compositions based on various announced topics. (Course taught as writing intensive.)

305, 306 Advanced Intermediate German Topics (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. 204 or equivalent.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Topics will be of a cultural, historical and/or literary nature. The purpose of the course is to improve reading proficiency and introduce students to German language culture. Taught in German or English. (Formerly GER 205, 206)

307 Advanced German Grammar (3:3).

  • Pr. two intermediate German courses or equivalent.

Intensive study of German grammar (including features not covered in lower levels of instruction) and of the contrasting structures of German and English. Introduction to reference tools.

311 Business German (3:3).

  • Pr. 203 or its equivalent.

Introduction to the special vocabulary and syntax of German as used in business contacts, correspondence and articles. Practice in reading and writing German for business purposes and travel. [CFL]

403 Introduction to German Literary Studies (3:3).

  • Pr. 301, or equivalent and permission of instructor.

Readings from various genres by representative authors of the Age of Goethe, Young Germany, Poetic Realism, Symbolism, Expressionism, and contemporary literature. Introduction to methodologies of literary analysis. (Formerly GER 303)

404 Introduction to Modern German Culture (3:3).

  • Pr. 204 or equivalent and permission of instructor.

History and analysis of German popular culture in the age of modernism. Readings and discussions of works by authors such as Spengler, Benjamin, Freud, Bovenschen, Enzensberger, Habermas. (Formerly GER 304)

405 Advanced Topics in German Literature (3:3).

  • Pr. 301 or permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Topics will be of a literary nature. (Formerly GER 305)

406 Advanced Topics in German Culture (3:3).

  • Pr. 301 or permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Topics will be of a cultural nature. (Formerly GER 306)

407 Advanced Topics in German Language (3:3).

  • Pr. 301 or permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Topics will be of a linguistic or pedagogical nature, and may include: History of the German language; study of major language changes from Indo-European to modern High German; readings of short texts in Old High and Middle High German literature; theories of language development. Taught in German or English. (Formerly GER 308)

491, 492 Tutorial (1 to 3), (1 to 3).

  • Pr. permission of instructor.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Directed program of reading, research, and individual instruction in Germanic literatures and languages. (Formerly GER 401, 402)

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

 

Russian Courses (RUS)

Courses in English Translation

Russian Literature in English translation courses are as follows:

201, 202 Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3).
313 Tolstoy in Translation (3:3).
314 Dostoevsky in Translation (3:3).
315 Soviet-Russian Literature in Translation (3:3).
316 Modern Polish Literature in Translation (3:3).
511 The Russian Novel in Translation (3:3).

A full description of these courses will be found in numerical order in the Russian courses listed below.

 

Courses For Undergraduates

101, 102 Elementary Russian (4:4), (4:4).

Basic principles of grammar; graded reading of selected texts; some conversation; language laboratory facilities.

201, 202 Russian Literature in Translation (3:3), (3:3).

Survey of Russian prose beginning with early Russian Literature and focusing on nineteenth-century Russian prose up to 1917. Works from the following writers are read: Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Goncharov, Turgenev, Leskov, Garshin, Kuprin, Chekhov, Bunin, Belyj, Sologub. No knowledge of Russian required. Baer. [WL, CWL].

203, 204 Intermediate Russian (3:3), (3:3).

Review of grammar, practice in conversation, selected readings from nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. [CFL]

305, 306 Advanced Grammar, Conversation and Composition (3:3), (3:3).

Intensive reading of unedited Russian texts plus conversation and composition based on the reading. Baer.

313 Tolstoy in Translation (3:3).

Intensive study of his artistic writing between 1852-1910. Tolstoy's moral views are considered as part of the course. Baer. [WL, CWL].

314 Dostoevsky in Translation (3:3).

Intensive study of his artistic writing between 1846-1880. His political and religious views are considered as an integral part of the material of the course. Baer.

315 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature in Translation (3:3).

Intensive study of the artistic writing in Russia from 1917 to the present. Readings cover poetry and prose of Sholokhov, Ilf and Petrov, Pasternak, Evtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, and others. Baer. [WL, CWL].

316 Modern Polish Literature in Translation (3:3).

Intensive study of the artistic writing in Poland from 1918 to present. Readings cover poetry and prose of Zeromski, Wittlin, Gombrowicz, Witkiewicz, Schulz, Iwaszkiewicz, Rozewicz, Tuwim, Andrzejewski, Milosz, and Herbert. Baer. [WL, CWL].

491, 492 Independent Study of Russian Literature (1 to 3), (1 to 3).

Directed programs of independent study and research. Topics in the poetry and prose of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Depending on student's qualifications, the readings will be either in translation or in the original. Baer. (Formerly RUS 401, 402)

493 Honors Work (3-6).

  • See prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493.
  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

Courses For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

511 The Russian Novel in Translation (3:3).

Survey of the Russian novel from the nineteenth (Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Goncharov, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy), to the twentieth century (Belyj, Sologub, Pasternak, and Solzhenitsyn). Analysis of artistic structure and ideas within the context of Russian literary history, philosophy, and religious thought. Baer.

 

Japanese Courses (JNS)

Courses For Undergraduates

101, 102 Elementary Japanese (4:4), (4:4).

Introduction to communicative Japanese and its writing systems: Hiragana, Katakana, Kanji. Students study fundamental words, phrases and expressions, and are introduced to basic grammar.

203, 204 Intermediate Japanese (3:3), (3:3).

  • Pr. JNS 101, 102.

Review of elementary grammar, and more advanced concepts of grammar (verb conjugations and verb tenses). Vocabulary building. Further acquisition of Chinese characters (Kanji). Reading of simple texts from Japanese literature. [CFL]

 
 
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