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School of Nursing

112 Moore Building
(336) 334-5010
www.uncg.edu/nur

Accreditation | Admission Criteria | General Information & Requirements | Honors in Nursing | Nursing Courses (NUR) | Nursing Major (BS) | Philosophy | Policy on Dismissal of Students | Policy on Unsafe Practice

 

Faculty

Lynne G. Pearcey, Professor and Dean

Virginia B. Karb, Associate Professor and Associate Dean

Eileen M. Kohlenberg, Associate Professor and Assistant Dean

Professors Chamings, Herrick; Associate Professors Barba, H. Brown, Courts, Dick, M. Evans, Kennedy-Malone, Krowchuk, Reed, Richardson, R. Saunders, Tesh; Clinical Associate Professors Eakes, J. Jones-Matthews, J. Lutz, McNeal, Sandoval; Visiting Associate Professor Schrull; Assistant Professors Beeson, Cookman, O'Rourke, R. Taylor, Werstlein; Clinical Assistant Professors Bartlett, Cowen, Helfers, Jacubowitz, Lehman, Packheiser, Wheeler, VonCannon; Visiting Assistant Professors Maree, S. Ouellette; Clinical Instructors Clapp, DeBrew, Hancock; Lecturers E. Amoako, Bays, S. Collins, Krasley, Longenecker, Orr

Adjunct Faculty: Adjunct Associate Professors Blank, Mims, Woodard; Adjunct Assistant Professors Barham, Beach, M. Collins, Crowe, Dickson, Hardin, Higgerson, Jarrett-Pulliam, Liner, Lundrigan, Mooth, B. Smith, Staab, Watters, Winchester; Adjunct Instructors Bensky, Johnson, Koontz, Merritt, R. Ouellette, Owens, Ripley, Sappenfield, Shedlick, Wagner

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The first two years of study are in general education, basic sciences, humanities, and basic nursing. The majority of work in the junior and senior years is in nursing.

The School of Nursing also offers a Master of Science in Nursing degree to prepare persons for a leadership role in nursing education, administration, and clinical practice. This program has a strong research emphasis and is founded on specialization in clinical practice.

 

Accreditation

The program offered by the School of Nursing is approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. It is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). For information, contact the NLNAC at 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, (212) 363-5555. The School of Nursing is an agency member of the National League for Nursing in the NLN Council of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs.

The School of Nursing also was granted preliminary approval for accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120, (202) 8877-6791.

 

Philosophy

The philosophy of the faculty at the School of Nursing is a statement of the beliefs and values they hold about the discipline and profession of nursing as well as nursing education. The conceptual framework and the goals of the undergraduate and graduate programs are built upon this philosophy.

Nursing is both a practice discipline and a profession. Comprising the discipline is a unique body of knowledge that is integral to nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing administration. The body of knowledge is continuously developed and refined as an outcome of scientific, historical, philosophical, and ethical inquiry and clinical evaluation. Nursing knowledge about health is generated through inquiry. Clinical evaluation advances nursing knowledge through the testing and validation of interventions that are used in nursing practice, nursing education, and nursing administration. The metaparadigm concepts of person, environment, health, and nursing form the foundation upon which inquiry and the profession are based.

Professional nurses use knowledge developed by the discipline to promote optimal health in people and to achieve professional goals. Nursing is an essential component of the health care delivery system and includes the promotion of wellness, the detection of alterations in health, and the provision of care for those with illness, disease, or dysfunctions. Professional nursing is characterized by inquiry, caring, and practice. Nurses are professionally, ethically, and legally accountable for the care they provide, and their practice includes independent and interdependent functions.

Professional nursing education is built upon a foundation of liberal arts, humanities, and the sciences, and it provides opportunities for learners to attain competencies required to practice professional nursing. Mature learners identify the need to know and assume responsibility for their own learning. Effective teachers establish an inviting learning environment that promotes collaboration among themselves and their learners for achievement of educational goals. Baccalaureate education prepares nurses to function as generalists, while education at the master's level prepares nurses as advanced practitioners in a speciality area.

 

Admission for Basic Students

Students must be formally admitted to the School of Nursing which is an upper division major. Only students who have formal, written acceptance into the School will be permitted to register in advanced nursing courses and complete work for the major. Admission should normally be sought during the sophomore year. The application deadline is February 1 of each year. Applications are obtained from the Advising Center in the School of Nursing. Transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended must be submitted with the application.

Minimum Criteria for Admission

  1. Overall grade point average above 2.5
  2. A grade of "C" (2.0) or better in each of the following courses: BIO 271, 277, 280; HDF 211; NUR 210, 220; PSY 121; SOC 335 or HDF 212
  3. No more than two of the above prerequisite courses may be repeated to attain a grade of "C" (2.0) or better. Prerequisite courses may be repeated only one time.
  4. Admission to the upper division is contingent upon receipt of a satisfactory evaluation signed by the student's physician of the applicant's physical and emotional health to provide nursing care. Forms will be sent to the applicants during the spring semester and must be completed and on file in the School of Nursing by the following August 1.

Students may not enroll in nursing courses beyond the foundation level courses cited above without being admitted to the School. Application for admission is possible while students are still completing the prerequisite courses, but unconditional admission cannot be granted until admission criteria have been successfully completed.

Admission to the University does not guarantee acceptance into the nursing major. Various health care agencies in Piedmont North Carolina cooperate with the School of Nursing in providing clinical learning experiences for students. The size of each incoming junior class is determined by the availability of these clinical resources. Therefore, it is impossible to assure space for every student who meets the criteria.

Registered Nurses

RN's interested in completing the BSN degree need to meet the University's requirements for admission. A registered nurse who brings advanced placement may build a minor in order to complete the 122 hours required for graduation. The Registered Nurse who has completed the prerequisite academic work and is ready to enter the professional major may earn up to 30 semester hours of credit for selected courses by special examination. Applications for special examinations are available in the Advising Center of the School of Nursing. Registered nurse students must make a "C" (2.0) or better in NUR 370 and 371 and a passing rate for the special examinations to be admitted into the 400-level nursing courses. Registered Nurse students must provide evidence of current, active, unrestricted RN licensure prior to admission to the required 300-level courses, and must have a current, active, unrestricted North Carolina RN license prior to enrollment in the required 400-level courses. The length of time required to complete the program varies with each individual.

Criteria for Progression in the Major

  1. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all required 300- and 400-level nursing courses in order to progress and graduate. An overall grade point average of 2.0 or better is required to graduate.
  2. Failure to earn a grade of C (2.0) or better will result in immediate dismissal from the School of Nursing.
  3. Students in the upper division clinical nursing courses who interrupt their studies for personal or academic reasons for longer than one year must reapply for admission to the upper division. (This item does not apply to RN to BSN students).

Grading in Practicum and Laboratory

A grade of unsatisfactory in lab or clinical practicum in nursing courses will result in a course grade of "F".

Appeal Procedure Related to Progression Policies

If a student wishes to appeal a policy in the School of Nursing, the student should complete a "Student Appeal Request." The Student Admission, Progression, and Appeals Committee hears student appeals. Students may obtain the request form and discuss the appeals process with the Chair of the Committee or the Associate Dean (undergraduates) or the Director of Graduate Studies (graduate students).

 

General Information and Requirements

  1. Nursing majors are required to purchase uniforms - estimated cost is $150. Uniforms are required for clinical activities in the 300- and 400-level nursing courses. Students usually purchase uniforms in the second semester of the sophomore year.
  2. Students will be charged for costs associated with course activities, including the cost of liability (malpractice) insurance (required for students in any clinical course), end of program diagnostic or assessment tests, and junior level lab kits.
  3. Students enrolled in 300- and 400-level courses with a clinical component are responsible for their own transportation to and from the agencies used for clinical activities/practicum experiences. Car owners are reminded that current liability insurance is required by North Carolina law.
  4. Students admitted to the major must provide evidence of the following by August 1 (forms will be sent to students earlier in the summer):
    • a tuberculin Mantoux skin test (or chest x-ray if skin test is positive) - annual requirement.
    • a tetanus toxoid immunization - every ten years.
    • Rubella and Measles evidence as required by the University.
    • History of Mumps or Mumps immunization.
    • Evidence of chicken pox immunization or positive titre.
    • Completion of the first Hepatitis B immunizations. By the start of the second year of clinical, completion of the Hepatitis B series.
    • Rarely, immunization requirements must be changed on short notice. Students will be informed of changes as soon as they occur.
  5. Students admitted to the major must provide evidence that they are certified to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and must be certified annually.
  6. Registered Nurse students are responsible for the items listed under "General Information" above, with the following modifications:
    • Registered Nurses are not required to purchase uniforms, but must wear identifying name tags and lab coasts or uniforms appropriate to the clinical setting. Specific requirements will be discussed in each clinical course.
    • Immunization requirements listed must be on file in the School of Nursing prior to beginning a clinical course. Forms are sent to students who preregistered for clinical courses. Students who do not preregister and have not received the immunization forms should stop by the Advising Center of the School of Nursing to obtain the forms.
    • Registered Nurses must have current CPR certification.
  7. Students are responsible for all costs associated with their own health care. Students are encouraged to have health insurance, and to be familiar with its provisions.
  8. Substitutions for prerequisite courses may be made with prior approval from the School of Nursing.
  9. Qualified students are encouraged to take Honors courses in the arts and sciences.
  10. All students are encouraged to take either Advanced Placement Exams, Biology Department exemption exam, or CLEP exam for BIO 111 which is prerequisite for BIO 271, 277, and 280.
  11. All students are encouraged to take the CHE 103 exemption exam offered by the Chemistry Department. The exam determines if a student should take CHE 103 (fall semester) prior to taking CHE 104 and 110 (spring semester).
  12. Placement in a student's first 100-level mathematics (MAT, CSC, or STA) course is determined by a required placement exam.
  13. The pre-licensure BSN program is designed to be completed in 8 semesters (4 academic years) of full-time study. Some students may wish to spread the requirements over 10 semesters, or to attend summer school. Depending on the number of transfer hours a student brings to UNCG, Registered Nurses may be able to complete the program in 3 semesters of full-time study, but part-time study is also available.

 

Policies for Nurses
Policy on Unsafe Practice

The nursing faculty of the School of Nursing have an academic, legal, and ethical responsibility to prepare graduates who are competent as well as to protect the public and health care community from unsafe nursing practice. It is within this context that students can be disciplined or dismissed from the School of Nursing for practice or behavior which threatens or has the potential to threaten the safety of a client, a family member or substitutes familial person, another student, a faculty member, or other health care provider.

I. Student Awareness

All students are expected to be familiar with the principles of safe practice and are expected to perform in accordance with these requirements. Within courses, counseling and advising processes, and other instructional forums, students will be provided with the opportunity to discuss the policy and its implications.

II. Definition

An unsafe practice is defined as:

  • an act or behavior of the type which violates the North Carolina Nursing Practice Act, Article 9 of Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes (NCGS 90-171.37; 90-171.44)
  • an act or behavior of the type which violates the Code of Ethics for Nurses of the American Nurses' Association
  • an act or behavior which threatens or has the potential to threaten the physical, emotional, mental or environmental safety of the client, a family member or substitute familial person, another students, a faculty member or other health care provider
  • an act of behavior (commission or omission) which constitutes nursing practice for which a student is not authorized or educated at the time of the incident.

III. Investigation and Evaluation of an Unsafe Practice

When an incident occurs which a faculty member believes may constitutes an unsafe practice, he/she shall immediately notify the student and instruct the student to leave the clinical setting. The faculty member will notify the Course Chair and/or Division Chair within the School of Nursing.

The Course Chair and/or Division Chair will investigate the incident within three working days to determine whether there are grounds for believing that an unsafe practice has occurred. If the incident is minor, the faculty member, in consultation with the Course Chair or Division Chair may require remedial work or instruction for the students.

If the incident is major, the Course Chair or division Chair, in consultation with the involved faculty member, will review the student's clinical performance evaluations, academic record, and potential for successful completion of the major in nursing. Based upon this careful and deliberate review, a decision to reprimand the student, require withdrawal from the clinical course, or to dismiss the student from the School will be made.

The Dean will be informed of the decision and will send written notification of the decision to the student via certified mail.

Should the student wish to appeal the decision, the student will submit a written request to the School of Nursing Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee. The Division Chair will provide the accumulated correspondence or documentation related to the issue to the committee.

IV. Hearing Process

The Chair of the School of Nursing Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee will thereafter notify the student, the faculty member, Course Chair, and division Chair as to the time and place for a hearing.

The Committee will hold a closed hearing within ten (10) days of receipt of the request for an appeal, at which time the faculty member, Course Chair, and division Chair may be present and provide documentation and other oral or written evidence regarding the incident. The student may be present and will be given an opportunity to provide documentation and other oral or written evidence regarding the incident. The student will be allowed an advocate/support persons at the hearing.

Following the factual presentation, the Committee will convene in executive session to review the actions taken against the student for unsafe practice and to make a recommendation regarding the resolution of the incident. The Committee will base its recommendation on the evidence presented at the hearing.

The Committee shall make its recommendation in writing to the Dean and forward pertinent documentation. The Committee may recommend the following remedies: support for the action take, remedial work or instruction, a reprimand, withdrawal from the course, or dismissal from the School of Nursing.

V. Post-Hearing Process

The Dean may accept or reject the Committee's recommendation. The Dean's decision will be made after review of the minutes of the hearing and report of the Committee. The Dean will notify the student and the faculty member(s) as to the decision made.

Dismissal from the School of Nursing does not constitute dismissal from the University.

A student who has been dismissed may reapply for admission to the School of Nursing. The application will be reviewed by the School of Nursing Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee.

Graduate students in the School of Nursing should refer to the current Graduate School Bulletin for the "Policy on Unsafe Practice" for graduate students.

 

 

Policy on Dismissal of Students Who Present Physical or Emotional Problems That Do Not Respond to Treatment

Students can be dismissed from the School of Nursing for Physical and/or emotional problems that do not respond to appropriate treatment and/or counseling within a reasonable period of time.

I. Investigation and Evaluation

When faculty members identify a student that presents physical and/or emotional problems that do not respond to appropriate treatment and/or counseling, they immediately suspend the student from the course. Faculty notify the Course Chair and/or Division Chair within the School of Nursing Upon determination by the faculty, Course Chair, and Division Chair, that they physical and/or emotional problems warrant dismissal from the School of Nursing, the Dean will be notified. The Dean, in consultation with the faculty, and upon review of the documentation, will make a decision regarding dismissal of the student from the School of Nursing. The Dean will send written notification of the decision to the student. Should the student wish to appeal the decision the student will submit a written request to the School of Nursing Student Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee. The Dean will provide the accumulated correspondence or documentation related to the issue to the committee.

A request for an appeal should occur within seven working days of written notification of the decision from the Dean.

II. Hearing Process

The chairperson of the School of Nursing Student Admission, Progression and Appeals Committee will thereafter notify the student, the faculty member, the Course Chair, and Division Chair as to the time and place for a hearing to determine whether the physical and/or emotional problems warrant dismissal.

The committee will hold a closed hearing within ten days at which time the faculty member, Course Chair, and Division Chair will be present and will provide documentation and other oral or written evidence regarding the incident. The student will be present and will be given opportunity to provide documentation and other oral or written evidence regarding the problem.

The student will e allowed an advocate/support person at the hearing.

Following the factual presentation, the Committee will convene in executive session to determine whether the problem warrants dismissal from the School. The Committee shall make its recommendation in writing to the Dean and forward pertinent documentation. The Committee may recommend dismissal from the School of Nursing major, or reinstatement in the program.

III. Post-Hearing Process

The Dean may accept, reject, or modify the Committee's recommendation. The Dean's decision will be made after review of the minutes of the hearing and report of the Committee. The Dean will notify the student and the faculty member(s) as to the determination.

Dismissal from the School of Nursing does not constitute dismissal from the University.

A student who has been dismissed may reapply for admission to the School of Nursing under the provisions published in the Undergraduate Bulletin. Graduate Students in the School of Nursing should refer to the current Graduate School Bulletin for the "Policy on Dismissal of Students Who Present Physical and/or Emotional Problems that do not respond to Treatment" for graduate students.

Tuition and Financial Aid

Detailed information about tuition, financial aid application procedures, and undergraduate scholarships can be found under Financial Aid.

Nursing Major
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Required: 122 semester hours, to include at least 36 hours at or above the 300 course level
AOS Codes
:

Nursing, U701
Nursing/RN to BSN, U702
Nursing/RN to BSN-Hickory, U720
Nursing/RN 2+ Program, U710

Requirements

All-University Liberal Education Requirements (AULER) (45 semester hours)

All students in this major must complete AULER requirements. Areas with specific requirements for this major are indicated below. See a detailed listing of the complete AULER area requirements and courses meeting those requirements.

AULER Area/Required Courses Sem Hrs

Analytic and Evaluative Studies (AE) 3
Required: PHI 121 or 220
Mathematics (MT) 3
Required: STA 108
Natural Science (NS) 6
Required: BIO 111; CHE 104 and 110L
Reasoning and Discourse (RD) 6
Required: ENG 101 or FMS 103 or RCO 101 for 3 of the 6 credits
Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB) 6
Required: PSY 121; SOC 101
AULER Electives 6
Required: HDF 211; NFS 213

Major and Related Area Requirements

  1. NUR 210, 220, 310, 320, 340, 360, 380, 410, 420, 430, 440
  2. BIO 271, 277, 280; SOC 335 or HDF 212.

Electives

Electives must be sufficient to complete 122 total semester hours required for degree.

NOTE: Requirements listed above, with the exceptions of PHI 121 or 220, STA 108, NFS 213, and electives, must be completed prior to enrolling in 300-level or 400-level nursing courses. Because of the time commitments involved with the 300- and 400-level nursing courses, and the difficulties in scheduling non-nursing courses concurrently with nursing courses, students should try to have most course requirements completed prior to entering the upper division major.

Course Requirements for Special Student Populations

Licensed Practical Nurse Students seeking a BSN:

Same as for the BSN program outlined above, with the following exceptions:

  1. Must provide evidence of current, active, unrestricted North Carolina LPN license.
  2. May earn credit (4 s.h.) for the following course by examination: NUR 210.

Students pursuing the BSN as a second degree:

  1. Satisfactory completion of courses in anatomy and physiology, NUR 210, and NUR 220 prior to entering the upper division major. Second degree students must also apply for admission to the upper division major.
  2. Completion of other University requirements for the degree.
  3. Satisfactory completion of the required 300- and 400-level courses (NUR 310, 320, 340, 360, 380, 410, 420, 430, 440).

Registered Nurse Students seeking a BSN:

  1. Satisfactory completion of NUR 370 and 371.
  2. May earn credit (30 s.h.) for the following courses by examination: NUR 210, 220, 310, 320, 340, 360, and 380. The cost of taking the exams one time is approximately $150. There is an additional charge to the student for posting credit to the transcript.
  3. Satisfactory completion of NUR 470, 471, 472, 473, 474, and one NUR elective. Example nursing electives include NUR 330, 345, 405, and 500-level nursing courses.
  4. Completion of the AULER requirements.
  5. Completion of sufficient electives to earn a minimum of 122 semester hours.
  6. Completion of other University requirements for the degree.

 

Honors in Nursing

Requirements

Nine to 12 semester hours to consist of:

  • 3 hours of NUR 493
  • 6 hours of NUR 440 (or 3 hours Nursing Elective for RNs)
  • 3 hours of HSS 490 (Senior Honors Project)

Qualifications

  • Enrollment in and successful completion of the University Honors Program
  • Declared Nursing Major
  • Maintenance of at least a 3.3 overall GPA

Recognition

The designation "Honors in Nursing" will be printed on the student's official transcript.

 

Nursing Courses (NUR)

Clinical practicums are noted with an asterisk (*). Students are expected to provide their own transportation to clinical experiences.

For Undergraduates

110 Introduction to Nursing: Academic Preparation and Professional practice (2:2).

Pr. Freshman pre-nursing major or permission of course faculty.

Introduction to professional nursing practice with an emphasis on development of academic skills and knowledge of learning resources related to the nursing major. (FA,SP)

210 Concepts in Nursing (4:3:3).

Pr. sophomore standing; overall GPA 2.3 or higher

Introduction to basic concepts in nursing. Laboratory activities encourage self-awareness and include exercises in values clarification and communication patterns, with practice of basic nursing skills. (FA)

220 Nursing Assessment of Well Individuals (4:3:3).

Pr. completion of BIO 271 or 277; overall GPA 2.3 or higher
Coreq: concurrent enrollment in BIO 271 or 277, whichever has not been completed.

Introduction to basic nursing assessment of well individuals over the life span. Laboratory activities encourage development of skills in interviewing, physical examination, and documentation of information. (SP)

*310 Nursing Care of Individuals with Psychosocial Problems (5:3:6).

Pr. NUR 210, 220.

Nursing care of individuals who have mental health or psychosocial problems. Clinical activities in selected mental health settings. (FA,SP)

*320 Nursing Care of Adults: Common Physiological Problems (5:3:6).

Pr. NUR 210, 220.

Nursing care of adults who have common physiological problems. Clinical activities in medical or surgical units within acute care settings. (FA,SP)

330 Health of Women (3:3).

Women and their health. Incorporating selected health issues, physical and developmental changes in the life cycle, health maintenance, and health problems. Not offered every semester. (Elective credit for nursing majors.) (Same as HEA 333)

*340 Nursing Care of the Developing Family (5:3:6).

Pr. NUR 210, 220.

Nursing care of growing children in maturing family. Wellness emphasized, with the study of illness, disease, or dysfunction. Clinical activities in agencies where care is provided for children. (FA,SP)

345 Basic Health Management of Children (3:3).

Pr. HDF 211.

Health appraisal and recognition of symptoms of illness in children. Emphasizes needs of children in group settings from infancy through elementary school age.

*360 Nursing Care of the Emerging Family (5:3:6).

Pr. NUR 210, 220.

Nursing care of families experiencing birth of an infant. Wellness emphasized, with the study of illness, disease, or dysfunction. Clinical activities in agencies where care is provided for parents and newborns. (FA,SP)

370 Concepts of Professional Nursing (3:3:0).

Pr. must be licensed Registered Nurse

Study of basic concepts in professional nursing. (FA,SP)

371 Nursing Health Assessment (3:2:3).

Pr. must be licensed Registered Nurse

Study of the health assessment of individuals over the life span. Laboratory activities promote the development of assessment skills. (FA,SP)

380 Nursing Skills (2:1:3).

Pr. 210 and 220.

Introduction and practice of nursing skills necessary for care of clients in clinical settings. (FA)

405 Pharmacology in Nursing (3:3).

Pr. admission to the School of Nursing or permission of instructor.

Study of major drug groups and their action, use, side effects, and nursing care considerations. Emphasis on nursing care and teaching, built upon physiology and basic pharmacology. (SP)

*410 Nursing Care of the Community of Older Adults (6:3:9).

Pr. NUR 310, 320, 340, 360, or equivalent.

Nursing care of older adults: theories of aging, physiological/ psychological functioning, impact of developmental changes, illness, and dysfunction. Clinical activities in agencies where care is provided for older adults. (FA,SP)

*420 Nursing Care in the Community (6:3:9).

Pr. NUR 310, 320, 340, 360, or equivalent.

Nursing care of individuals, families, and groups within the community setting. Exploration of environmental characteristics and resources. Clinical activities in community health agencies. (FA,SP)

*430 Nursing in Complex Organizations (6:3:9).

Pr. NUR 310, 320, 340, 360, or equivalent.

Nursing care of groups in complex acute-care settings. Emphasis on nurse's role in research, team membership, and professional growth. Clinical activities encourage development of basic leadership and organizational skills. (FA,SP)

*440 Nursing Practicum (6:1:15).

Pr. NUR 410, 420, 430.

A concentrated seven and one-half week practicum in a clinical area of the student's choice. Students simulate role of the employed graduate under the guidance of a selected nursing preceptor. (SP)

470 Community Health Nursing Concepts and Care (3:3).

Pr. completion of 370 and 371, and successful completion of the NLN Mobility Profile II Examinations or equivalent.

  • Current unrestricted North Carolina licensure as a Registered Nurse required

Nursing concepts and care of individuals, families, and groups within community settings. (FA/SP)

471 Nursing Care of the Older Adult (3:3).

Pr. completion of 370 and 371, and successful completion of the NLN Mobility Profile II Examinations or equivalent.

  • Current unrestricted North Carolina licensure as a Registered Nurse required

Nursing concepts and care of older adults: theories of aging, physiological/psychological functioning, impact of developmental changes, illness, and chronic dysfunction. (FA/SP)

472 Nursing Leadership and Management (3:3).

Pr. completion of 370 and 371, and successful completion of the NLN Mobility Profile II Examinations or equivalent.

  • Current unrestricted North Carolina licensure as a Registered Nurse required

The professional nurse's role in applying principles of leadership and management in health care organizations across the continuum of care. (FA/SP)

473 Nursing Research (3:3).

Pr. completion of 370 and 371, and successful completion of the NLN Mobility Profile II Examinations or equivalent.

  • Current unrestricted North Carolina licensure as a Registered Nurse required

Introduction to nursing research and the professional nurse's role in research. (FA/SP)

*474 Nursing Practicum, RN-BSN (4:1:9).

Pr./Coreq. 470, 471, 472, 473

  • Current unrestricted North Carolina licensure as a Registered Nurse required

Clinical application of theories, concepts, and research in community health and gerontological nursing. Emphasis on the roles of the professional nurse in leadership, management, and research. (FA/SP)

492 Independent Study (1-3:1-3).

Pr. approval must be granted by a nursing faculty member prior to registration.

  • May be repeated for credit.

Guided readings in nursing as an individual project designed with a focus on the nursing profession and/or nursing practice. Course offering is dependent on faculty availability.

493 Honors Work (3-6).

Pr. see prerequisites under Honors Program, XXX 493

  • May be repeated for credit if the topic of study changes.

 

For Advanced Undergraduates and Graduate Students

505 Computer Applications in Nursing (3:2:3).

Pr. Basic understanding of microcomputers or permission of instructor.

  • Not recommended for Nursing Administration majors.

An introduction to computer applications in nursing. Practical experience with microcomputers and generic software applicable to patient care and nursing management. Lab assignments will vary to meet specific learning needs.

540 Budget Development and Analysis of Nursing Services (3:3).

An introduction to the principles of fiscal management, health care agency accounting practices, and nurse manager's role in the budgeting process.

541 Nursing Case Management (4:2:6, Post baccalaureate Certificate; 3:2:3, MSN).

Pr. licensure as a Registered nurse.

Theory and practice of nursing case management in health related agencies. (FA)

550 Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing (3:3).

The physiological changes across the life span and common pathophysiological mechanisms.

551 Instructional Media and Technology in Nursing Education (3:3).

Selection/development, use, and evaluation of instructional media and technologies in schools of nursing, nursing staff development, and patient education. (FA/SP)

561 Scope of Gerontological Healthcare (3:3).

Aging theories and concepts; demographics, health problems, treatments, supports, and the role of the gerontological heathcare professional.

563 The Aged Developmentally Disabled (3:3).

Pr. Undergraduate level psychosocial nursing course or special education courses and permission of the instructor.

Healthcare needs of older developmentally disabled persons. Holistic model incorporating the belief that developmentally disabled can continue to learn as they age.

564 The Elderly Mentally Ill Client (3:3).

Pr. Undergraduate level psychosocial nursing course or equivalent course and practicum.

A holistic approach to nursing practice with the elderly mentally ill using theories of psychological functioning, and socio-economic conditions.

580 Psychoneuroimmunological Aspects of Nursing (3:3).

Pr. senior or graduate status in nursing or permission of instructor.

Emerging mind-brain-body interactions. Information transmission among the mind, neuroendocrine and immune systems related to nursing.

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate level courses.

 
 
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