Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Clifford Smyth
Associate Professor

Clifford

Office: Petty 105
Email address: cdsmyth@uncg.edu
Personal web page: www.uncg.edu/~cdsmyth/
Starting year at UNCG: 2008
Office hours: MWF 12:00 noon - 12:50 p.m.

Education

Ph.D. in Mathematics, Rutgers University (2001)

Teaching

Fall, 2017
  • MAT 150-08 LEC (Precalculus I), MWF 10:00-10:50, Sullivan Science Building 201
  • MAT 516-01 LEC (Intermediate Abstract Algebra), MWF 11:00-11:50, Petty Building 007
  • MAT 802-01 DTS (Dissertation Extension)
Spring, 2018
  • MAT 191-03 LEC (Calculus I), TR 9:30-10:45, Stone Building 352
  • MAT 310-02 LEC (Elementary Linear Algebra), TR 3:30-4:45, Petty Building 217

Research Interests

Combinatorics, Mathematical Biology
Current Students: James Rudzinski

Selected Recent Publications

  • James Rudzinski and Clifford Smyth, Equivalent Formulations of the Bunk Bed Conjecture, The North Carolina Journal of Mathematics and Statistics, Vol 2 (2016)
  • Karl Mahlburg and Clifford Smyth, Symmetric Polynomials and Symmetric Mean Inequalities. Electronic Journal of Combinatorics (EJC,http://www.combinatorics.org/), Volume 20, Issue 3 (2013), P34.
  • Clifford Smyth, The BKR inequalities on finite distributive lattices. Combinatorics, Probability and Computing (CPC), Volume 22, Issue 04, pages 612–626, July 2013.
  • Dan Cranston, Clifford Smyth, and Douglas West, Revolutionaries and spies on trees and unicyclic graphs. Journal of Combinatorics, Volume 3, Number 2, pages 195–206, 2012.
  • David Howard and Clifford Smyth, Revolutionaries and spies. Discrete Mathematics, Volume 312, Issue 22, pages 3384–3391, 28 November 2012.

Brief Bio

Dr. Smyth earned his Ph. D. in mathematics in 2001 from Rutgers University, advised by Mike Saks. Afterwards, he held postdoctoral positions at the Institute for Advance Study, Carnegie Mellon University, and MIT until joining UNCG in 2008. His research interests lie in discrete mathematics, including problems coming from combinatorial probability, theoretical computer science, discrete geometry, and combinatorial enumeration.