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Psychology Courses (PSY)

GE Core denotes General Education Core credit;
GE Marker
denotes General Education Marker credit;
CAR denotes College Additional Requirement credit.

Courses for Undergraduates

121 General Psychology (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

Survey of psychology. Includes psychology as science, nervous system, growth and development, sensory and perceptual processes, motivation, emotion, learning, social behavior, personality (normal and pathological), statistics, testing, intelligence, aptitudes, and achievement.

122 Careers in Psychology (1:1)

Pr. C- or better in PSY 121

Grade: Pass/Not Pass (P/NP)

Provides a road map for how students can prepare for a career in psychology with a bachelor's degree, including how to prepare for graduate education, if desired. (Fall & Spring)

230 Biological Psychology (3:3)

GE Core: GNS

CAR: GLS

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121 or BIO 111 or BIO 105

An introduction to the contributions of molecular, genetic, cellular, developmental, physiological, and evolutionary biology to the scientific understanding of psychological processes.

240 Principles of Learning (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Survey of scientific theories and research on learning and motivation according to classic theorists and contemporary behavioral psychologists. Topics include reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, and examples from the real world.

250 Developmental Psychology (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

May not receive credit for 250 and HDF 302

Survey of scientific theories and research findings in human psychological development, including its biological, behavioral, cognitive, social, and emotional aspects.

260 Psychological Perspectives on Social Psychology (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Survey of scientific theories and research on the nature, causes, and consequences of individual behavior in social context. Topics include relationships, groups, attitudes, persuasion, aggression, altruism, and prejudice.

265 Theories of Personality (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Major theories of personality including psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, cognitive, biological, and trait perspectives. Additional focus on methods of research and assessment that provide the theoretical foundation for studying individual differences. (Formerly PSY 360)

275 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Survey of main issues within clinical psychology. Includes nature and ethics of profession, research methodologies, clinical assessment, models of therapy including empirically validated treatments, and systems of care principles.

280 Cognitive Psychology (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Survey of scientific theories and research in cognitive psychology. Topics include human learning, attention, memory, and problem solving.

310 Statistics in Behavioral Science Research (3:3)

Pr. grades of at least C- in PSY 121, and in STA 108 or MAT 115 or MAT 150

Psychology majors must earn a grade of at least C- in PSY 310 (or STA 271).

Students may not receive credit for PSY 310 and STA 271 or STA 352 or ECO 250.

Moment and product-moment statistics; description and inference; estimating parameters and testing significance. Taught at introductory level. Requires knowledge of elementary algebra.

311 Research Methods in Psychology (4:3:3)

Pr. grades of at least a C- in PSY 310 and ENG 101, and a P in PSY 122

Psychology majors must earn at least a C- in PSY 311.

Introduction to the research methodologies of psychology and to analysis and interpretation of data. Experience with methods of data collection, basic statistical ways to display and analyze data, and writing reports.

314 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Pr. for Business majors: admission to the Bryan School of Business and Economics; grade of C or better in MGT 312.

Introduction to industrial and organizational psychology with special emphasis on employee motivation, selection, training, and organizational determinants of employee behavior. (Same as MGT 314)

318 Belief in “Weird” Things (3:3)

GE Core: GRD

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Psychological research on belief in extraordinary, “weird” phenomena, including, but not limited to, the paranormal, superstition, divination, projective tests of personality, alternative healing practices, and unconscious mind control and repression.

341 Abnormal Psychology (3:3)

GE Core: GSB

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

A description of the various psychological disorders is presented along with the research methods used to study them. Each disorder is approached from a number of perspectives: biological, psychosocial (psychodynamic, interpersonal, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic) and sociocultural.

346 Sex, Gender, and Behavior (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Evaluation of effects of biological sex and gender role socialization on personality and behavior through examination of empirical research.

365 Psychology of Art, Creativity, and Genius (3:3)

Scientific research on psychological aspects of art, the creative process, and the nature of genius and expertise, with examples from fine art, music, literature, architecture, and industrial design.

375 Psychology of Aging (3:3)

Pr. PSY 121 or permission of instructor

Overview of psychological issues in aging. Students evaluate research findings in the psychology of aging and apply this knowledge to understanding personal development and the development of others. (Fall)

380 Psychology and the Law (3:3)

GE Core: GPR

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121; freshmen must have permission of instructor

Psychological research on issues associated with legal proceedings, including but not limited to, jury selection and behavior, eyewitness memory and testimony, and standards of proof will be discussed.

385 IQ and Intelligence (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least a C- in PSY 121

Psychological research on intelligence and intelligence testing, addressing questions about single versus multiple intelligencies, genetic versus environmental influences, sex and race biases, development and aging, social and emotional intelligence, and learning disabilities.

The remaining PSY courses (400 and 500 levels) require the successful completion of PSY 121, and the indicated 200- and/or 300-level prerequisite courses.

 

401 Academic Writing in Psychology (3:3)

Pr. senior standing

Advanced training in academic writing in psychology and related fields, with an emphasis on the goals of scholarly writing, scientific usage and style, and strategies for composing and revising. (Fall or Spring)

433 Research Experience in Psychology (1–3)

Pr. nine (9) s.h. in Psychology, and permission of instructor

May be repeated for credit.

Opportunity for students to participate in various phases of research projects being conducted by faculty members in the Department of Psychology.

435 Brain and Psychological Processes (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 435L.

Study of brain mechanisms for feeding, aggression, sexuality, cognition, consciousness, sleep, learning, memory, thinking, and communication. Examination of brain defects in abnormal behavior and responses to drugs and psychotherapy.

435L Brain and Psychological Processes with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 435.

Brain mechanisms for feeding, aggression, sexuality, cognition, consciousness, sleep, learning, memory, thinking, and communication. Examination of brain changes with psychopathology and drug treatment. Includes laboratory methods for investigating brain processes.

436 Sensory and Perceptual Processes (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 436L.

Survey of sensory modalities including pain, balance, touch, olfaction, gustation, audition, and vision and how they receive, process, and modify environmental stimuli leading to perception of the world.

436L Sensory and Perceptual Processes with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 436.

Sensory modalities including pain, balance, touch, olfaction, gustation, audition, and vision as they receive, process, and modify environmental stimuli. Includes laboratory work assessing human visual, auditory, somatosensory, gustatory, olfactory, and vestibular perception.

438 Animal Behavior (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 438L or BIO 438 or 439.

Application of theory of evolution to the explanation of animal behavior. Surveys a variety of species, addressing several behavioral categories as well as issues in sociobiology and human evolution. (Same as BIO 438)

438L Animal Behavior with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230, 310 (or STA 271), and 311; or BIO 111 and 112

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 438 or BIO 438 or 439.

Application of theory of evolution to animal behavior. Includes laboratory and field techniques for assessing behavioral adaptations. Surveys several behavioral categories in a variety of species. (Same as BIO 439)

442 Behavioral Approaches to Complex Human Behavior (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 240

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 442L.

Examination of contemporary behavior-analytic research and theory pertaining to the social origin of conceptualizing, language, self-awareness, self-control, problem solving, and remembering.

442L Behavioral Approaches to Complex Human Behavior with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 240, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 442.

Contemporary behavior-analytic research and theories of the social origin of conceptualizing, language, self-awareness, self-control, problem solving, and remembering. Includes laboratory methods for investigating elementary and complex behavioral phenomena.

444 Changing Behavior in Real World Settings (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in PSY 240

Principles and applications of behavior analysis in human service, educational, home, and medical settings. Recommended for psychology majors, and graduate and undergraduate students in related human service fields.

455 Social and Personality Development (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 250 or HDF 302

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 455L.

Examination of current theories and empirical research concerned with social, emotional, and personality development.

455L Social and Personality Development with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 250 or HDF 302, and 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 455.

Examination of current theories and empirical research concerned with social, emotional, and personality development. Includes laboratory work focusing on social and personality development across the life span.

456 Cognitive Development (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 250 or HDF 302

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 456L.

Examination of current theories and empirical research concerned with perceptual and cognitive development.

456L Cognitive Development with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 250 or HDF 302, and 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 456.

Examination of current theories and empirical research concerned with perceptual and cognitive development including laboratory work, focusing on research methods of cognitive development.

457 Developmental Psychobiology (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 230, 250 or HDF 302

Examination of current research and theory in behavioral development in non-human animals. Topics include instinct theory, role of experience in development, and the relation between development and evolution of behavior.

460 Interpersonal Behavior and Group Processes (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 460L.

In-depth analysis of interpersonal behavior and group processes. Topics include aggression, prosocial behavior, attraction, prejudice and discrimination, social comparison, close relationships, and groups.

460L Interpersonal Behavioral and Group Processes with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 460.

Analysis of interpersonal behavior and group processes including laboratory work focusing on research methods of social psychology. Topics include aggression, prosocial behavior, attraction, prejudice, discrimination, social comparison, and groups.

461 Attitudes and Social Influence (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 461L.

In-depth analysis of attitudes and social influence. Topics include attitude structure, formation and change, propaganda and persuasion; attitude-behavior consistency; conformity; compliance; and obedience.

461L Attitudes and Social Influence with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 461.

Analysis of attitudes and social influence, with laboratory work on attitudes and social influence. Topics include attitude structure, formation and changes, propaganda and persuasion; consistency, conformity, compliance, and obedience.

462 Social Cognition: Perceiving and Thinking in a Social Context (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 462L.

In-depth analysis of how we think about ourselves and others. Topics include impression formation, attribution, affect and cognition, social judgement, stereotyping and the self in social context.

462L Social Cognition with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 462.

Analysis of how we think about ourselves and others, including laboratory work in social cognition. Topics include impression formation, attribution, affect and cognition, social judgement, sterotyping, and the self.

463 Psychological Perspectives on Personal Relationships (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 463L.

In-depth examination of current theories and empirical research focusing on psychological perspectives of personal relationships. Includes topics related to relationship forms and processes such as intimacy and power.

463L Psychological Perspectives on Personal Relationships with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 260, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 463.

Current theories and research on psychological perspectives of personal relationships including laboratory work in the scientific study of personal relationships. Topics include processes such as intimacy and power.

470 Psychological Disorders of Children (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 275

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 470L.

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 502.

Etiology, assessment, and treatment of various psychological disorders of children, e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, anxiety.

470L Psychological Disorders of Childhood with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 275, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 470.

Etiology, assessment, and treatment of various psychological disorders of children, e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, and anxiety. Includes laboratory work with assessment and other methods in clinical child psychology.

472 Field Experience in Applied Settings (3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in PSY 341 or 470; junior standing; and permission of instructor

Malpractice insurance fee required for certain placements.

Community field experience designed to illustrate practical applications of psychological principles and research. Class meetings and written work required in addition to field placement.

481 Cognition and Consciousness (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 280

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 481L.

In-depth discussion of psychological processes of attention and memory and their relationship to consciousness. Analyses of theories, experimental techniques, and results.

481L Cognition and Consciousness with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 280, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 481.

In-depth discussion of psychological processes of attention and memory and their relationship to consciousness. Analyses of theories, experimental techniques, and results including laboratory work on research methods of cognitive psychology.

482 Human Memory (3:3)

Pr. PSY 121 and PSY 280

Memory is involved in many everyday activities and is essential for personal identity. This course is about theories and applications of research on human memory and learning.

483 The Psychology of Thinking (3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 280

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 483L.

Research and theory on human problem-solving and reasoning. Topics include classification, categorization, decision-making, rational thought, and a discussion of awareness in thinking.

483L Psychology of Thinking with Laboratory (4:3:3)

Pr. grade of at least C- in 280, 310 (or STA 271), and 311

Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSY 483.

Research and theory on human problem-solving and reasoning including laboratory work conducting and participating in experiments about thinking. Topics include classification, categorization, decision-making, rational thought, and awareness in thinking.

490 Directed Readings in Psychology (1–3)

Pr. 18 s.h. in psychology, and permission of instructor

May be repeated for credit.

Reading and library research on a specialized topic in the primary scientific literature in psychology under the supervision of a faculty member.

493 Honors Independent Study (3)

Pr. admission to Lloyd International Honors College, 3.30 GPA in the major and 12 s.h. in the major, and completion of PSY 311.

Opportunity for qualified students to complete directed study and/or research under faculty supervision. Work will lead to a written proposal for and enrollment in Senior Honors Project (see HSS 490).

495 Senior Honors Seminar (3:3)

Pr. 311H and completion of 200-level core requirements for psychology major, senior standing, and GPA 3.30; or permission of the instructor

May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

May be used to meet major requirements.

Provides students with advanced study and critical analysis of contemporary problems in psychology.

499 Experimental Course: Introduction to Linear Regression in Psychology (3:3)

Pr. PSY 311 and permission of instructor

An introduction to linear regression techniques from an applied perspective, topics include: simple and multiple linear regression models; inferences in regression analysis; diagnostics; ANCOVA and coding categorical predictors. (Offered fall '08)

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates & Graduate Students

515 History and Systems of Psychology (3:3)

Pr. senior standing; minimum of 12 s.h. of psychology, including 121; or permission of instructor.

Discussion of prescientific thinking on psychological problems, origin of systems of psychology, and ways systems are reflected in contemporary psychology.

519 Special Topics in Psychology (3:3)

Pr. appropriate introductory 200-level core course or equivalent, or permission of instructor

May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Intensive examination of current theories and research in a specific area of biopsychology, learning, development, cognition, social psychology or clinical psychology. Check with department for offerings.

Please refer to The Graduate School Bulletin for additional graduate-level courses.